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The type of boot you want will depend greatly on what sort of hiking you are doing, both in terms of distance and terrain. Personal preference also plays a strong role. For day walks on decent paths you will probably be fine with a sturdy pair of trainers or running shoes. Whereas for longer routes over rougher terrain, a studier boot if probably better, as ...


3

In the book Lightweight Backpacking and Camping, by Ryan Jordan, p. 307, Jordan says that a supply of DEET (presumably 100% concentration) for two weeks should weigh about 0.2 oz, including the bottle. That's about 0.001 ounces per hour of hiking. You used about 1 ounce per hour. Now Jordan is writing about how to go ultralight, so his rate of consumption ...


3

I haven't seen any particular rules for boots at Philmont. I am aware of a wide range of footwear having been used, ranging from the traditional heavy high-topped boots to lightweight, low-cut trail runners. In general it seems the Philmont trails are well-maintained, and with the exceptions of places like Valle Vidal (off-trail) and Mt. Baldy (plenty of ...


3

I lean towards light and fast dry running shoes such as the Lone Peak from Altra. This shoe goes under $100 on sale. It also comes with a gator-ready velcro at the back. There is no ankle support which I don't personally consider a problem. I've seen this shoe recommended at trail shops. They seem to be quite popular on long trails nowadays. I recommend ...


2

These boots seem perfectly reasonable to me. If they are comfortable and not about to fall apart I can't see why they should be a problem. I suspect what they mean is that the are not familiar/do not stock that brand of boot so can't recommend it. It would seem crazy to me if they said you can't use perfectly good boots because they aren't on some list. ...


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I carry a Victorinox knife. On my last few trips I've used the various tools on it to pry shellfish off rocks, slice cheese and salami, prepare vegetables, cut sticking plaster, cut duct tape for gear repair, cut cloth to make a dressing, open packets of dehydrated food neatly. I have, in the past, used the wood saw on it to clear windfall. It did the job ...


2

A multi-tool or a knife? A multi-tool can be a very appropriate tool for backpacking. It combines the function of many of the tools you mentioned. You may carry the tools you mention above, though. (Note: I've NEVER needed a bottle opener...) If you mean a knife, read on... I do a lot of backpacking in the Eastern US, so I am going to assume that this ...


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I bring a very small pocket knife with me when I'm backpacking (or whatever they call the activity in Europe...?) As you say, it's convenient because it combines several tools in one. You don't really need three big, heavy pieces of silverware. What works for me is a spoon as my main thing to cook and eat with, plus the pocket knife for tasks like cutting ...


1

I would recommend trying Repel Lemon Eucalyptus Bug Spray. The Eucalyptus oil acts as a cooling agent and helps minimize sweating. I live in a deciduous ecosystem and can promise you this stuff works. In terms of lightweight: the bottle my husband and I use has been with us on multiple camping, climbing, biking, and kayaking excursions and we still have a ...


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One suggestion, which you will need to try by experiment - dry ice on the bottom of a Thermos. Pack some layers of insulation on top of the dry ice, and put the item on top, with a thermometer so you can keep an eye on temperatures. Adjust the insulation to get the temperature sitting where you want it. The thermometer can be checked though the trip and ...


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A lot definitely comes down to personal preference. Some like tall boots, light weight trail runners, more "classic" hiking boots, regular sneakers, or even sandals (I don't recommend that last one...) My preference is actually for a 8" combat / law enforcement style boot (preferably with a side-zip for easy removal). I feel that they provide a good amount ...


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When camping near my vehicle, I use an old A-frame, 4-man tent. There's room for all my gear with plenty of sleeping and dressing space. I can stand up to change clothes. If I am planning on an extended stay, 3 nights or more, I usually pitch a 12x14 foot tent. Table, chair, cot, stove. Nice and comfortable. If I'm backpacking, I either leave the tent ...


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My wife and I have just returned from a week of hiking in and near the eastern Pyrenees, starting from Foix, having flown in to Toulouse. From there we did three days on the Sentier Cathar, which follows the route of the GR107, then a day south on the GR107 to Ax les Thermes, where we spent a very pleasant day. Then we spent three days on the Carlit Massif, ...



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