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4

I did this with my dog the other day. He seemed to quite enjoy the experience...It was much warmer in the bag than out.


1

Pedometers seem to be calibrated for use on flat ground. Rough or difficult terrain can cause you to take more steps and it is this mechanism which pedometers use to determine their output. If you have a known pace length and can compensate for it using some measure for it to be diminished when walking a route that isnt flat then id say it could be mildly ...


5

It depends a lot on the terrain. I wear a pedometer throughout the week (health program for work), and I use a GPS when hiking. From experience - on level terrain - I know that I get between 2100 and 2200 steps per mile. I walk between work and the coffee shop (a round trip of about 1.25 miles) each day, and this is fairly consistent. If you calibrate ...


3

I think you need to separate this into two parts: Money spent before the trail starts, and budgeting while on the trail. Before you start, you're going to spend money on gear for sure. Your sleeping bag that was good enough for a weekend trip is now your home... Do you really want to put up with that limp, cold bag for 5-6 months? Same goes with a lot of ...


0

Find a spot at least 200 ft away from water sources, camp, and trails. (Per LNT guidelines) Place soiled items in a gallon zip-loc bag with water and small amount of concentrated, biodegradable camp soap (I use Dr. Bronner's). Burp all air from the bag. Agitate the mixture until desired laundering is reached Open the bag slightly, squeezing it and ...


1

I only wear hiking boots if there is significant off trail or heavy scree. The last dozen or so expeditions (1 week + trips ~50 lb pack) I did I mostly wore MEC reef boots, or divers boots, sized to allow medium weight work socks. The routes we did were mostly horse trails in Willmore Wilderness or in Rocky Clearwater Recreation Area (Alberta). With this ...


2

I find that hiking boots help protect my ankles and feet from twigs and things that can scratch or hit against them, help prevent rain from getting in (I can wear long pants with sneakers but still water will get inside), and protect my toes from stubbing them against rocks and boulders. Also the soles of the hiking boot offer more traction than the typical ...


2

I had a similar question (which I have deleted) relating to the UK, here's what I found (from comments to my deleted Q and from answers here) that varies from the other answers here I primarily wanted to draw a post-walk track from memory as a longer term record of where I'd been. I carry a GPS but don't turn it on unless I'm lost (it's hard to be lost in ...


3

This sounds to me what we would call in the UK prickly heat. What causes prickly heat? Prickly heat usually develops when a person sweats more than usual, such as during hot or humid weather. However, it is also possible to get prickly heat in the winter. The condition is caused when the body's sweat glands become blocked. Excessive sweating ...


2

If you are a person who burns readily then sunblock at all times plus long sleeve shirt and hat are your only answer. However the danger of sun, IMHO is overrated, compared to the other hazards of life. At one point I used the World Almanac for figures: Fatal skin cancers kill about 2 people per hundred thousand per year. So skin cancer has about the ...


2

Heat rashes are caused by excessive heat trapped under the skin. As you specifically referred to ankles and shins, I'd suggest you considering using shorts instead of full pants, only if those tiny red rash-bums have not burst. If those are already burst then you should be going to a doctor in order to avoid any infection. Try to avoid clothing with ...


2

As Paul says, think of sunscreen as in addition to other protection methods. So while you can go without a shirt, it's ideal to also wear a shirt and use other protection methods like a hat. As for whether clothing is always better, that in large part depends on the clothing. Some clothing provides good sun protection while others (think shirts with ...


6

According to this health-related website, you should still wear a shirt: You should not think of sunscreen as an alternative to avoiding the sun or covering up. It is used in addition. Sunscreens should not be used to allow you to remain in the sun for longer - use them only to give yourself greater protection. No sunscreen is 100% effective and so it ...


4

Assuming you're reapplying the screen often (sweat washes it away) and it's a quality one, then it would do for what matters sun protection (although you should still properly cover your head with a hat or a bandana or whatever). That being said, I would use a shirt anyways; to protect your skin from the abrasion of the rucksack, to absorb some sweat, and ...



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