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1

I would recommend trying Repel Lemon Eucalyptus Bug Spray. The Eucalyptus oil acts as a cooling agent and helps minimize sweating. I live in a deciduous ecosystem and can promise you this stuff works. In terms of lightweight: the bottle my husband and I use has been with us on multiple camping, climbing, biking, and kayaking excursions and we still have a ...


1

My wife and I have just returned from a week of hiking in and near the eastern Pyrenees, starting from Foix, having flown in to Toulouse. From there we did three days on the Sentier Cathar, which follows the route of the GR107, then a day south on the GR107 to Ax les Thermes, where we spent a very pleasant day. Then we spent three days on the Carlit Massif, ...


2

I carry a Victorinox knife. On my last few trips I've used the various tools on it to pry shellfish off rocks, slice cheese and salami, prepare vegetables, cut sticking plaster, cut duct tape for gear repair, cut cloth to make a dressing, open packets of dehydrated food neatly. I have, in the past, used the wood saw on it to clear windfall. It did the job ...


2

A multi-tool or a knife? A multi-tool can be a very appropriate tool for backpacking. It combines the function of many of the tools you mentioned. You may carry the tools you mention above, though. (Note: I've NEVER needed a bottle opener...) If you mean a knife, read on... I do a lot of backpacking in the Eastern US, so I am going to assume that this ...


3

In the book Lightweight Backpacking and Camping, by Ryan Jordan, p. 307, Jordan says that a supply of DEET (presumably 100% concentration) for two weeks should weigh about 0.2 oz, including the bottle. That's about 0.001 ounces per hour of hiking. You used about 1 ounce per hour. Now Jordan is writing about how to go ultralight, so his rate of consumption ...


2

I bring a very small pocket knife with me when I'm backpacking (or whatever they call the activity in Europe...?) As you say, it's convenient because it combines several tools in one. You don't really need three big, heavy pieces of silverware. What works for me is a spoon as my main thing to cook and eat with, plus the pocket knife for tasks like cutting ...


1

When camping near my vehicle, I use an old A-frame, 4-man tent. There's room for all my gear with plenty of sleeping and dressing space. I can stand up to change clothes. If I am planning on an extended stay, 3 nights or more, I usually pitch a 12x14 foot tent. Table, chair, cot, stove. Nice and comfortable. If I'm backpacking, I either leave the tent ...


0

If you're using a campfire, some foods, like fresh-caught fish, don't require cookware. Just wrap in aluminum foil and cook in the coals. Fish or biscuits can even be cooked directly on the coals: scoop some ashes over the coals so they're not TOO hot, then place the food directly on the ashes. After it's cooked, just brush off the ashes. You should ...


0

Last week, I backpacked into Idaho's White Cloud Mountains. I boiled a few eggs the night before and placed them in the refrigerator. On the morning we left, I took them out and rolled them up in a t-shirt and tucked them under a jacket in my pack. They were still very cold the next morning and cold enough on the second morning. Daytime temperatures were ...


2

These boots seem perfectly reasonable to me. If they are comfortable and not about to fall apart I can't see why they should be a problem. I suspect what they mean is that the are not familiar/do not stock that brand of boot so can't recommend it. It would seem crazy to me if they said you can't use perfectly good boots because they aren't on some list. ...


3

I haven't seen any particular rules for boots at Philmont. I am aware of a wide range of footwear having been used, ranging from the traditional heavy high-topped boots to lightweight, low-cut trail runners. In general it seems the Philmont trails are well-maintained, and with the exceptions of places like Valle Vidal (off-trail) and Mt. Baldy (plenty of ...


1

One suggestion, which you will need to try by experiment - dry ice on the bottom of a Thermos. Pack some layers of insulation on top of the dry ice, and put the item on top, with a thermometer so you can keep an eye on temperatures. Adjust the insulation to get the temperature sitting where you want it. The thermometer can be checked though the trip and ...


1

A lot definitely comes down to personal preference. Some like tall boots, light weight trail runners, more "classic" hiking boots, regular sneakers, or even sandals (I don't recommend that last one...) My preference is actually for a 8" combat / law enforcement style boot (preferably with a side-zip for easy removal). I feel that they provide a good amount ...


4

The type of boot you want will depend greatly on what sort of hiking you are doing, both in terms of distance and terrain. Personal preference also plays a strong role. For day walks on decent paths you will probably be fine with a sturdy pair of trainers or running shoes. Whereas for longer routes over rougher terrain, a studier boot if probably better, as ...


3

I lean towards light and fast dry running shoes such as the Lone Peak from Altra. This shoe goes under $100 on sale. It also comes with a gator-ready velcro at the back. There is no ankle support which I don't personally consider a problem. I've seen this shoe recommended at trail shops. They seem to be quite popular on long trails nowadays. I recommend ...


7

In most places without extremely human habituated bears, a simple hang with the line tossed over a sturdy, isolated branch and tied off to an adjacent tree trunk is suitable. The bag should end up being roughly 12 feet above the ground, 5 feet away from the trunk and 5 feet below the branch. The PCT hang is a clever variation of this which eliminates the ...


2

I have always used my backpack as part of my sleep system. All food stuffs are double wrapped,in the center of the pack,then the pack is placed at the head of the sleeping bag,with a fleece placed over it. If you are worried about vermin getting at it,in the past I have been known to cover it with a rain hood and suspend it from a tree,using a rope thrown ...


1

Buy yourself a light-weight wok. They are superb. You can cook anything any how you like in them. I have been camping-travelling for decades, and yes, the trangia IS good. But a wok is surprisingly better. I was fortunate to find a 10 inch, double handed wok in japan when I was travelling with the trangia. I was replacing the trangia's pans with the wok. I ...


1

A buddy of mine has an ultralight set made by a Swedish maker called Trangia. It weights 330 grams for the burner, windshield, a 800 ml pan and a frypan. It works with a spirit burner, so you don't have to carry a large gas canister. The whole thing has 15 cm of diameter and about 6 cm of height. All pieces fit inside of the 800 ml pot an the frypan (which ...


1

I cook almost everything in a titanium pot, by boiling water and rehydrating dehydrated meals, whether they be prepackaged backpacking meals from a variety of sources (including Mountain House, Packit Gourmet, Packlite Foods, or the many other options out there), meals sold in dehydrated form at grocery stores but not necessarily intended exclusively for ...


3

I'm not sure what "graniteware" is, but it doesn't sound lightweight! What you want is: light compact durable Something from the REI Cooksets page would probably be appropriate. There are a variety of styles and sizes there. For one person on a 4-day hike you won't need much.


7

Titanium cookware, combined with a small gas stove, is very common in backpacking. If you look at camp cookware from Backcountry, REI, and other outdoor gear vendors you'll see a lot of titanium. It's sturdy, light-weight, not too terribly expensive, and has good heat transfer properties. If you're looking for something even cheaper, aluminum is another ...


7

Before deciding on the tent to buy think about the characteristics of your different options. Tent size (how many people does it hold, is there room for luggage or even indoor cooking?) Tent weight (you want to keep that as low as possible obviously) Type of construction (generally this doesn't matter too much unless you have a favorite) In terms of ...


6

Since you are not carrying the tent, I would buy a 2 person tent for the extra space. This will allow more room for clothes, sleeping stuff, changing your clothes etc. If it rains it would be easier to stay away from the wall of the tent. If you are carrying the tent, then you need to think about weight and a 1 person might be better.


0

A rope and pulley will keep bears from getting to it and if it is on the ground then it is a target for critters. And then so are you.


1

As safe as you make it. Don't fool yourself, bears are there, and they will attack you if they feel they are being threatened. The Canadian Rockies are wild and full of large predators, it's not not a zoo or game preserve, the danger is real. You must understand that you are in their territory, the most important thing to do is to properly educate yourself ...


0

I agree shampoo is not the way to go with removing ticks. The CDC has a short explanation of removing them: http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html Do make sure to get checked out by a doctor if you start feeling sick, it could be something serious.


1

I have never heard of shampoo being a tick deterrent or being more efficient at tick removal than say washing your hair simply with water. If you are in an area where diseases transmitted by ticks are an issue then I'd suggest you use the common safety procedures: vaccination search your body before going to bed/while showering (it's best to have somebody ...


3

If you do want to stay in the Michigan area, you might want to check out the North Country Trail . As a disclaimer, I've never done any of the sections in Michigan, but I the section I hiked in Pennsylvania/New York was really nice. There are thousands of miles in the trail, so you can't really get bored. There are some sections that are connected by roads ...


2

Pros: The ultimate freedom – from where to camp to pace, breaks or even where to go, it is all up to you There is a lot more room in the tent and you can spread your things everywhere No one makes stupid navigation errors and argues about it with you (unless it is you...) When you are camping, you can just read a book, or look at the sunset or just lay ...


11

Snow blindness is at best very painful. UV damage to your eyes is not something you want to play around with. If only 40% protection they are are not sunglasses, they are fashion accessories and offer no where near enough to protect your eyes for more than an hour. For $10 you will get glasses that provide 99% protection, why risk it?


1

It depends on the dog. Dogs have far superior senses to humans, which is why dogs became man's best friend, it was mutually beneficial for us to coexist. Early man gave docile wolves their scraps from their kills, and in return, the domesticated wolves provided man with an early warning system against predators and other enemies. Protection from large ...


2

Many areas in Scotland can be quite quiet, especially outside the peak season. There are also many long distance walks ranging from the well known to the less so. I've heard the Rob Roy way and the Cape Wrath trail are quiet good although I've actually done neither. There is no system of manned mountain huts like in many places but many unmanned bothies ...


4

How about Via Dinarica, virtually no information and similar experience in another neck of the Balkans. Three trails, each about 650 km - still more of an idea than established project. Part of it overlaps with the Peaks of the Balkans route.


4

would you look at visiting as far a field as New Zealand. Lots of trips, lots of information online - Its possible to do 10+ days and not see another person if you choose the trip and the time of year carefully. We have a vast track and hut network (In our terms a track can be nothing more than markers nailed to trees or cairns on a mountain side. A hut ...



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