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12

In dry climates you can take advantage of evaporative cooling - especially on a bike. In hot and humid places you are stuck with insulation and pre-cooled water and/or ice. Have you experimented to see if a cloth wrapper around your bottles is enough to cool things when damp? Of course, you're not going to get highly chilled water, but it can be ...


8

If you're hiking in dry, hot weather places, and you have a whole backpacking setup your best bet is to store your water deep in your pack. The sun is your only real enemy here. In the desert, I've had success with packing my bag so that my water is "wrapped" in my insulated gear - jacket and sleeping bag. Since I don't actually want to expose my sleeping ...


7

This doesn't directly answer your question and might not be to your liking, but it's what I do. Basically, I don't bother trying to keep it cold. However, I do add flavoring. I find that flavoring helps a great deal in making it feel a lot more OK to drink warm liquid. Think of it sortof like tea if that helps. Actually I don't add the flavoring for ...


5

Instant ice packs, like this one, which are usually used for treating sprains and strains sound a bit like what you are looking for. They use a chemical reaction to cool, but, they are single use only. Such instant ice packs work by mixing ammonium nitrate with water. The hydration of ammonium nitrate is endothermic (absorbs heat). Perhaps unintuitively, ...


5

Mix the water in with lots of crushed ice - or even just use crushed ice to start with rather than water. I prefer this approach over just freezing the bottle outright because I find it easier to get the water out when I want to. Other than that, I'd try wrapping cloth and then foil round the bottle (shiny side on the outside) which should help to keep at ...


4

There are two problems with this question: Night-time temperatures vary a great deal across Spain-it is a big country, with coasts, plains and mountains Your ideal temperature may be very different to mine So what you want to do is look at the range of expected temperatures in the area you plan to camp, compare those with temperatures you are comfortable ...


4

During the 1996 Summer Olympics, there were vendors all over Atlanta selling these: Cool bandannas. I think they're filled with polymer beads similar to the ones found inside diapers that hold moisture once you get them wet. I wouldn't say it kept me completely cool, but-- being "completely" cool in 96-degree heat is a fantasy, unless you're in air ...


3

Reusable heaters rely on heat of crystallization of sodium acetate, that is, heat you obtain by crystallization of a solution. Coolers rely on heat of solvation, which is the heat that gets absorbed (in this case) when ammonium nitrate is dissolved in water. You cannot make an easily reusable hand cooler, but technically the system can be restored to its ...


2

When water evaporates, it cools the surrounding surface. This is primarily why we sweat - our body is using this process to cool itself down. So, a buff (or mitts) dipped in water can act as pretty effective coolers as they dry out. To 'recharge' simply dunk them in water again...



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