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15

The first solution that comes to mind is a "zeer", or pot-in-pot refrigerator. However, this functions best in hot and dry environments as it relies on evaporation to work. Such a device is constructed by nesting one clay pot inside another, with a layer of sand between them (about an inch on the bottom, a few inches on the sides). The sand is then soaked ...


15

Freeze the bottles, then keep them together if possible. Any insulation around them will help.


14

In dry climates you can take advantage of evaporative cooling - especially on a bike. In hot and humid places you are stuck with insulation and pre-cooled water and/or ice. Have you experimented to see if a cloth wrapper around your bottles is enough to cool things when damp? Of course, you're not going to get highly chilled water, but it can be ...


11

Although technology has brought us many conveniences most of them require supporting power or other technology. You seem set on refrigeration and you say: "I am willing to go to just about any extent short of buying a fridge and a generator." Perhaps you should consider solar panels (photovoltaic) and an electric refrigerator. Both technologies are ...


10

If you're hiking in dry, hot weather places, and you have a whole backpacking setup your best bet is to store your water deep in your pack. The sun is your only real enemy here. In the desert, I've had success with packing my bag so that my water is "wrapped" in my insulated gear - jacket and sleeping bag. Since I don't actually want to expose my sleeping ...


8

This doesn't directly answer your question and might not be to your liking, but it's what I do. Basically, I don't bother trying to keep it cold. However, I do add flavoring. I find that flavoring helps a great deal in making it feel a lot more OK to drink warm liquid. Think of it sortof like tea if that helps. Actually I don't add the flavoring for ...


6

You'll need to do several things: Change your habits and foods Work Combine several techniques First, you need to more carefully consider the necessity of refrigeration. Refrigerators are used to keep food in a "safe" temperature zone where bacteria is less active, and this requires temperatures close to freezing. Passive cooling, such as root cellars ...


6

Mix the water in with lots of crushed ice - or even just use crushed ice to start with rather than water. I prefer this approach over just freezing the bottle outright because I find it easier to get the water out when I want to. Other than that, I'd try wrapping cloth and then foil round the bottle (shiny side on the outside) which should help to keep at ...


5

Instant ice packs, like this one, which are usually used for treating sprains and strains sound a bit like what you are looking for. They use a chemical reaction to cool, but, they are single use only. Such instant ice packs work by mixing ammonium nitrate with water. The hydration of ammonium nitrate is endothermic (absorbs heat). Perhaps unintuitively, ...


4

During the 1996 Summer Olympics, there were vendors all over Atlanta selling these: Cool bandannas. I think they're filled with polymer beads similar to the ones found inside diapers that hold moisture once you get them wet. I wouldn't say it kept me completely cool, but-- being "completely" cool in 96-degree heat is a fantasy, unless you're in air ...


4

Reusable heaters rely on heat of crystallization of sodium acetate, that is, heat you obtain by crystallization of a solution. Coolers rely on heat of solvation, which is the heat that gets absorbed (in this case) when ammonium nitrate is dissolved in water. You cannot make an easily reusable hand cooler, but technically the system can be restored to its ...


4

There are two problems with this question: Night-time temperatures vary a great deal across Spain-it is a big country, with coasts, plains and mountains Your ideal temperature may be very different to mine So what you want to do is look at the range of expected temperatures in the area you plan to camp, compare those with temperatures you are comfortable ...


3

My idea is to keep your thermos bottle full with ice chips, then when thirsty simply dump some of your ice into a small cup then add your beverage! Save as much as you can by returning the unused ice to the thermos for future use. Of course its best to stick with the same beverage, and or water, so flavors don't get mixed if you use the ice again. I still ...


3

If your ambient temperatures (air/water/earth) don't get down below refrigerator temperatures (2-4 C), and in summer I suspect they don't, then the second law of thermodynamics says you can't do this without an energy source. Since electricity is out, you could consider a propane refrigerator.


3

Because water evaporates at any temperature over 32 DegF, a swamp cooler or evaporative cooler is possible in any climate that needs cooling (though perhaps not in a powerful enough fashion depending on the cooling required). In a still body of water, the evaporation rate is proportional (in some form) to the humidity of the air, the air temperature, the dew ...


2

It there is a well nearby use it. 1. by dropping sealed and floating containers to water and then using a net to get them back. This works very well with beer cans. 2. Put the food in a bucket and use rope to lower it near the water.


2

When water evaporates, it cools the surrounding surface. This is primarily why we sweat - our body is using this process to cool itself down. So, a buff (or mitts) dipped in water can act as pretty effective coolers as they dry out. To 'recharge' simply dunk them in water again...


1

You can find sleeping bags with a zipper, so you can open it up to a big rectangle and use it as a blanket. If it is really warm lie down on top of it.


1

If you only use PET bottle try to put a neoprene sleeve around them. Neoprene is used to insulate the tubes of the so called "hydration systems", that is those bladders with a tube going from the bladder to your mouth when you want to suck water from it. Neoprene works pretty well both in keeping the heat in winter and the opposite as you need. It doesn't ...



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