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14

In the UK you should probably contact the RSPCA or RSPB. I think RSCPA is probably best as they actually do welfare stuff whereas RSPB is about conservation. They should have the best knowledge of whether the bird needs to be killed and how best to do it. I presume other countries have similar charities. If you need to kill the bird yourself I think the ...


7

As a rancher, I routinely have to dispatch injured birds. If you don't have a knife handy, there are two ways: Grasp the bird by the head and use a whipping motion to decapitate. The body separates from the head. Toss the head. Another way is to do pretty much the same thing and rapidly rotate the body of the bird, but with less force - this breaks the ...


7

Though I have never been hunting, neither have got into a situation where I had to bank on wildlife for survival, I had once imagined and practiced a very basic snaring technique, without involving an animal in real. But, this technique that I am going to explain is NOT necessarily the best one to implement under extreme circumstances. Things you need: ...


5

As you specifically mentioned Southern Nevada Mojave Desert, if you come across a snake and considering the worst case its a venomous snake, then its very likely to be a Rattlesnake or a Side Winder or an Adder. The best way to avoid trouble with venomous reptiles is to be aware of your surroundings and observe some rules for your own safety. Most bites ...


4

I'm no herpetologist, but in my experience, snakes are in the "you don't bug me, I won't bug you" category. If you're sitting in a blind and are still, you aren't likely to surprise them. Surprising a snake or making it feel endangered is what causes most bites. If you're still, they'll tend to just pass by without bothering you, and will likely detect you ...


4

From gov.uk you can hunt the following legally: Birds You don’t need a licence to hunt: game birds, eg pheasants and grouse quarry birds and certain wild birds, eg moorhens and woodcock certain waterfowl, eg some ducks and geese Deer You don’t need a licence to hunt deer in open season. Open season varies by region and species. ...


3

Hanging game birds is very common in the UK. All Pheasant shot in the UK are normally hung (whole and unplucked for several days). Pheasant are shot in the autumn here, the temperatures normally being <10C. The idea of hanging is to improve flavour. Game birds can be pretty tastless if not hung or aged correctly. I wasn't sure about hotter climates so ...


3

If it were a wild bird, I would call the nearest wildlife rehabilitator for instructions. Sometimes a bird can be saved, or at least they will gain information about what is going on with the local populations, which is valuable not just for them, but for others who may use their data. Scientists and government are increasingly finding that wildlife ...


3

In situations like that, I wring the neck. Just grab the bird's head and twist it around and around. The skull will detach from the spinal column and kill the bird quickly. You have to actually kill the animal with your bare hands, but that's better than letting it suffer.


3

Decapitation. Cut the head with a cleaver, machete or axe. It is gruesome, and the body will flap (so I suggest you tie the legs and wings). But the bird will almost instantly die. Check your local laws if the bird is endangered or protected. You do not want to be on the wrong side of the law when trying to be humane.


2

I was told the following by an old chicken-farmer when I was young: 'humane' is our (humans) notion/idea of the least amount of pain/stress/fear (which we believe takes place in the brains). He believed that the brain in decapitated heads (and broken necks) remain operational for about 30 seconds (probably based on well known guillotine stories where the ...


2

It would be unusual for a snake to attack a stationary person. I suppose it's possible that a snake might approach you or your shelter to try to get warm, and you could then surprise them after they had already settled down near you. I'm guessing there is no coyote season in Nevada, so you could be doing it any time of year. If it's the winter, snakes are ...


2

In Canada, you will need a hunting license depending on the province (or territory) and type of game you wish to hunt. Typically, a safety course is also required. For example, moose requires applying for a draw which is valid for a certain zone as determined by the department of natural resources. Moose Hunting British-Columbia Moose Hunting ...


1

The best place to snare a rabbit is on a trail. Find an area that is overgrown and thick. Look for areas like this http://www.instructables.com/id/Snaring/step8/Game-trails/ In my experience, baiting rabbits is very hard. I don't have a good knot I use for snaring. I typically make snares before I go out to the woods, but in a survival situation this ...


1

I've done both. I've never had a problem with squirrel spoiling (disease) in hot climates. However it's going to be safest to empty the guts in the field, as soon as you reasonably can. The goal of course is to get the temperature down as quickly as possible. The method I prefer is to open them neck to stern, pull the soft organs out, and put a spacer ...


1

Short answer: there's a lot of public land, most likely state owned (not federal), that's available for hunting. [1] There might be limitations for nonresidents and/or based on what you plan to hunt with (e.g. firearm, black powder, bow) but this looks like a great starting point for information: Public Hunting and Access to TPWD Lands "Texas Parks and ...


1

It is always the hunters responsibility to correctly identify their targets and handle their weapons safely. That said, you can always help them out by making it clear your are a human as others have noted. Bright colours, standing in the open, and human noise are all good. Trying to hide in a bush and trick the hunter with deer calls is a bad idea. It's ...



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