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23

If you are running long distances over multiple days with boots, packs etc., and you must complete the distance you should plan to pop a blister at the end of day, but then you need to be sure you add some sort of padding to replace the protection the blister is giving you. You also need it cleaned and sealed, so antibacterial cleaner, then compeed, fakeskin ...


19

Having not seen my chin for 15 years, here are a few thoughts on the practical aspects (assuming one is personally equally comfortable with a beard as without): Pros: Sun protection - for a limited, but sensitive area of skin Bug protection - a long-sleeve shirt/fleece with a collar turned up and long hair / beard make for a mosquito-free and DEET-free ...


15

My mother, who is a doctor, has always told me to let blisters be. Keeping them unpopped keeps them clean and sterile, and (if I recall correctly) the fluid in them actually helps them heal faster. If you're in the wilderness, you really don't want to pop them and risk infection. Even if you have antibacterials, a popped blister is likely to contact dirt and ...


14

Good hygiene is a highly subjective benchmark. Clean enough for comfort might be different than clean enough for company. Ocean water, albeit salty, is water. You can bathe with it, wash clothes with it, wash dishes with it etc. Soap behaves differently (the surfectants don't suds as well) but you'll still get things cleaner than they were. As for bathing, ...


13

The options: Smooth oval rocks (from river beds if possible) Snowball Rounded sticks Leaves (as said elsewhere, be careful of which kinds) soft pine cones (relatively rare, but plentiful where they exist!) handful of grass Carry a piece of cloth specifically designed for this purpose and be sure to do two more things: 1 - Don't use the cloth for anything ...


9

When washing in the backcountry there are some techniques and considerations that will benefit yourself and the pristine wilderness you are traveling within. Don't ever wash near a water source, you are contaminating it for yourself, everyone else, and the animals that drink from it. 1. Always carry water at least 500 feet away from: The source of the ...


8

Some methods Alcohol, either hand sanitizer or rubbing alcohol with a microfiber towel to have a "bath" Advantages: Lightweight, fast. Disadvantages: Dries your skin, have to carry the alcohol, and breathing it isn't perfectly healthy. Solar Shower Advantages: Can get pretty darned clean. Disadvantages: You have to carry it, collect water, and even ...


8

I have it on good authority that the Shewee (no info on the other one) is incredibly easy to clean, as it is made of recyclable polypropylene, so all that you would want to do is give it a quick rinse with water if you need to. As it is so highly polished, all you normally need to do is give it a shake, but I think a quick rinse may be what you want on a ...


8

I will share what they told me when I was on a one month group-organised trek through the Balkan Mountains in Bulgaria. This is what the leader / group medic did. If you are going to end the trek soon, don't bother the blister. However, if you know that you will need to abuse that part of the body over the next days, and you know the blister is going to ...


7

The recommended depth you mention is standard Leave no Trace guidelines for most regions, and strikes a balance between: Getting it out of site (and other feet) Keeping it from running off Keeping it near the layer of organic soil Burying too deep can be a problematic from a health and safety standpoint, since pathogens have been known to survive for a ...


7

My beard experience Itches Hides ticks well, allowing them to go undiscovered Good nest for lice, fleas, etc. Mosquitoes can't get through (but since you're not ape-man this doesn't really help, they'll just bite you elsewhere). Catches food and grossness. Regarding summer/winter -- it's not significant either way. Hair will burn but not terribly well ...


6

Unless you are dealing with Polar bears the answer is: No. According to an article on livescience: Despite campfire fears dating back to at least 1967, black bears and grizzly bears are not attracted to the odors of menstruation, according to a recent Yellowstone National Park report. Polar bears may be interested in the smell of menstrual blood, ...


6

Yes you can. And more to the point, you should (save weight, and leave no trace). I have not found a backpacking cooking mess that could not be cleaned with a combination of (in this order): Tongue Finger Water + Finger (drink it -- truly "Leave No Trace" (its not as bad as you think)) Snow (when available) Pine Needles / plant leaves / grass stalks / ...


5

What I do is carry a small microfiber cloth. First I rinse my dishes, then I swish with a small amount of boiling water (usually left from our post dinner coffee), and wipe with the cloth. Voila, clean dishes. Sorry I missed the part about "found in the wilderness". Given that just skip the cloth and use the water ;) Another note. If the above method ...


4

After a long day on the trail, I'll take my grooming bucket (reused plastic margarine or sherbet container with lid), and go down to the water hole. Collect some water and rinse out the bandana. Start at the head and work my way down/in. I'll pull off my shirt and then wash my torso. Pull off my socks and wash my legs. I then wash my groin area, and ...


4

Species in the forest will vary by locale. Here in the Pacific Northwest, Thimbleberry aka Salmonberry leaves are thick and soft, so they make a good wiping implement. The subtly-named How to Shit in the Woods is a good primer on this topic. One option described there is to use urine. Basically, you hold back the urine until you're done with the bowel ...


4

Rinse your socks and undies out with water, rub them on rocks then re-rinse and wring dry. Put them on damp in the morning. I can't think of a lighter weight solution than that :) I've done plenty of trips with no extra pairs of anything. You certainly won't smell good at the end of 10 days, but I don't think your performance will be affected. Edit: ...


3

That's the rule on the Ozark Trail and the Appalachian Trail, to the best of my recollection. However - many times the ground is just rock surrounded by bits of dirt. Do the best you can and use your best judgement. Remember that everything else dumps it in the woods without burying it, but they're not using TP, either. No one wants to step in it, see it, or ...


2

One important aspect burying it deep provides, is that it reduces the chances of your feces tainting the local water sources with disease. If you were to just drop a load on the top of the ground for example, water runoff can very easily bring bacteria and other organisms from your feces to streams and lakes. However, if you bury it, its runoff will only ...


2

I wouldn't burst it, especially if I was going to be hiking for a few more days - if it does end up getting infected then this could end up making things a lot worse - and it's more likely to happen in the wild! Instead, I'd advise reducing the irritation as much as possible by wearing multiple / thicker socks, and use blister plasters if you have them. If ...


2

A long time ago, before people had consistent access to Lye or any of the oils we use in soap now, they made it out of what they had on hand. A common one would be wood ash and rendered animal fat ( tallow ). There's guide on eHow on making said soap, but it appears to not only be time intensive ( rest time of over two months total ), but also involves ...


2

Recently a friend and I have began experimenting with the use of our beards as moisture traps while skiing and hiking in snow storms. The general idea is that the skin temperature is warm enough to melt the deepest layer of ice/snow/frost, and one should be able to sip that melted moisture through their beard, given adequate vacuum conditions created by the ...


1

Use a biodegradable (e.g. cornstarch-based) bag to pick up waste and then pack it in a airtight container. For obvious reasons the container should only be used for that purpose and disinfected when you return home ready to be reused next time. Also, look out for schemes such as Keep Cairngorm Snow White which provides biodegradable bags, a pot to carry the ...


1

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...



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