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10

I have it on good authority that the Shewee (no info on the other one) is incredibly easy to clean, as it is made of recyclable polypropylene, so all that you would want to do is give it a quick rinse with water if you need to. As it is so highly polished, all you normally need to do is give it a shake, but I think a quick rinse may be what you want on a ...


7

The recommended depth you mention is standard Leave no Trace guidelines for most regions, and strikes a balance between: Getting it out of site (and other feet) Keeping it from running off Keeping it near the layer of organic soil Burying too deep can be a problematic from a health and safety standpoint, since pathogens have been known to survive for a ...


3

That's the rule on the Ozark Trail and the Appalachian Trail, to the best of my recollection. However - many times the ground is just rock surrounded by bits of dirt. Do the best you can and use your best judgement. Remember that everything else dumps it in the woods without burying it, but they're not using TP, either. No one wants to step in it, see it, or ...


2

One important aspect burying it deep provides, is that it reduces the chances of your feces tainting the local water sources with disease. If you were to just drop a load on the top of the ground for example, water runoff can very easily bring bacteria and other organisms from your feces to streams and lakes. However, if you bury it, its runoff will only ...


2

Outdoor hair is full of sweat, but basically probably cleaner than the normal days. The air outdoor is much fresher than in the city. Probably we can skip the hair washing also prevent environment pollution but I would say You can try dry shampoo to clean your hair, you can look at this: http://facianohair.com/camping-outdoor Dry shampoo is easy to carry ...


1

An absolutely vital part of my camping equipment is what we call the washing up bowl: a rectangular plastic tub that's smaller than a sink, but larger than your plates and pots. I actually take two or three, stacked inside each other. They serve many purposes at once: we keep all the kitchen bits and pieces (cutlery, cooking utensils, spices, little ...


1

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...



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