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22

Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). It's naturally occurring, and to get a level of toxicity to animals you would need to get to 450mg per liter. Unless you're operating a mine or using literally tons of the stuff, it's quite safe and you'll never get near that. From a 2008 USGS study: Chronic toxicity was observed at concentrations that ranged from 450 ...


17

Even for "multi-week" trips, brushing with water alone is not going to compromise your tooth health. The abrasive action of the brush does most of the work, and missing the flouride hit for a few days won't affect your teeth in the least. Plus, it saves weight. So, the best LNT option: don't use it. If you MUST use toothpaste (or an alternative), try a few ...


11

Simply throwing them in the wash should suffice, but if you want to be extra sure the fungus dies, you could soak your socks in a 1 part bleach to 10 parts water mixture for ten minutes. Keep in mind that it's not your socks you need to worry about so much as your shoes, they're a little more difficult to clean. Try changing your insoles out, they make ...


7

Hot Water - needs to be very hot - 140 F (60C) - reported to kill all, but is not good for wool. UV Light - hang out to dry in direct sunshine. Products exist that claim to sterilize shoes using UV light and can be used for socks. Chemicals - Anti fungal Laundry rinse (e.g. Canestan) is effective, Borax etc. Bleach alone does not kill fungus spores. ...


7

You can also use Miswak, then you don't need to cary a tooth paste along but still have medicinal benefits, instead of having to use just a toothbrush with only water (although there is no harm in that either). The miswak (miswaak, siwak, sewak, Arabic: سواك‎ or مسواك) is a teeth cleaning twig made from the Salvadora persica tree (known as arak in Arabic)...


6

Brush without paste. You do not need toothpaste. You get the minty freshness, you get fluoride, you get additional abrasion, but none of those things are essential. Brushing is far more important than the toothpaste. I've been told by multiple dentists that although toothpaste can be helpful, it is completely unnecessary (you can get the fluoride from other ...


6

I watched a program about this the other day. My vote for by far the worst is the Australian Gympie Gympie plant One of the world’s most venomous plants, the Gympie-Gympie stinging tree can cause months of excruciating pain.... Even protective particle masks and welding gloves could not spare her several subsequent stings – one requiring ...


5

The two thoughts are correct. The other considerations should be: The layout should ought to be like Trail - Campsite and Kitchen area - Thickets (if there are any) - Toilet area. Preferably it can be a triangle. So that one doesn't have to pass through kitchen area to go to toilet area. "It should be lower than the Kitchen area, water source and campsite"...


5

There are some alternatives of toothpaste in ancient India as a part of YOGA. Try Teeth cleaning twig : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teeth_cleaning_twig DANTA MOOLA DHAUTI The Sanskrit word danta means ‘teeth’, dhauti means ‘wash’ and moola means ‘root’. Therefore this practice is concerned with cleaning the teeth and gums. Utensils In India ...


5

A good car camping kitchen, in my mind, mimics a home kitchen. Propane stove(s) with a total of 2-4 burners (maybe 6 if it is a big group) Propane oven or grill (either propane or charcoal) depending on your menu Multiple lighters Pots, pans, and utensils suitable for the menu(s) and group size I like a large pot (for pasta), medium pot (vegetables), ...


4

In this post: How to clean cookware? which focuses more on equipment for cleaning (soap, sponge, sand, that sort of thing), one answer is directly related to this question (emphasis added): Regardless of your cleaning procedures, you definitely should use purified drinking-quality water for at least the final rinse of your dishes. I always play it safe ...


3

There is a far higher risk of disease from poor hygiene by those in the outdoors than the consuming stream water, let alone using it for hand and dish washing. By not using stream water directly, you introduce a level of rationing of water. This rationing is likely to encourage poor hygiene habits, and increase the risk of disease. For washing hands, if ...


3

Your question is essentially Is stream water fit for cleaning hands, dishes, waste bins/buckets? and then it becomes really an issue of volume as you have a party of people who you need to cater for. The answer is it can be be, but likely not. People take different perspectives on the risk of contaminated water. Compared to others I have met who ...


3

Leaves are only an option while they're in season. In winter, snowballs work great.


3

I would highly recommend a menstrual cup. That's what I use while camping and hiking as they're light easy to carry and generate little-to-no trash. You can simply pour out and bury the blood rather than packing out a load of dirty tampons. However keep in mind that there is a learning curve associated with each type of cup, and there are a LOT of ...


3

I'd cut my brush shorter long before I'd take the time to try drilling it. But If I was serious about going ultra light, I wouldn't pack a normal/modified toothbrush at all, I'd take a finger brush, either a reusable one: Or some disposable ones: I used to keep a couple brush-ups in my bag, they work ok, but honestly you could probably achieve the ...


3

You could use "toothy tabs" tablets, sold by lush. The tablets are solid toothpaste. They consist chiefly of kaolinite, baking soda, and essential oils. Besides being non-toxic and biodegradable, they are also lightweight, small, and the packaging is plastic-free. If you want to be 100% certain, you could just use baking soda or make your own tooth powder. ...


3

I prepare my toothpaste using this recipe, main ingredients here being baking soda and coconut oil. Positive parts: it works just as well as "classical" toothpaste, it is safer to swallow, ingredients are natural. Negative parts: it has a more fluid consistence, needs a somewhat heavier container to carry it around.


3

Urtica dioica (Stinging Nettle) while it grows over much of the world, It grows in abundance in the Pacific Northwest, especially in places where annual rainfall is high. Found in large patches where much of the vegetation is evergreen and resembling a mint plant. A couple of hand fulls may easily be harvested and may appear to be the best choice in the ...


2

Stefansson proved once and for all that diet affects teeth more than brushing. His experiences with the Arctic Inuit were published in Harper's Magazine in 1935, but are also available here in three parts: I, II, III. It's arguably the upside-down food pyramid that is responsible for lining dentists' pockets today. Starch gunks up one's teeth and gets ...


2

I would look into OraWellness. It's a mix of essential oils that comes in a very small bottle, so it's nice and compact. You also only need 2-3 drops per use and works so well I can sometimes skip a cleaning or just use water as needed. The "fuzz" or plaque we accumulate on our teeth is delayed when using this. I tried this almost 1.5 years ago and it has ...


2

Floss. If you brush with water only and then floss, your teeth and gums will be OK for even a multi-week trip. Pack out your floss! Maybe add a pack of peppermints for a cleaner feel.


2

I agree mostly with LBell's answer: just using water to dislodge food debris is enough! However, I felt I should write against Dilute it - in some areas, the recommended method is to spit normally, then urinate on it so there is not a large gobble-worthy glob for some critter to munch on. Mammals, especially deer and goats, seek out the smell of ...


2

Because Toothpaste is nothing else than some kind of polish, you could use precipitate chalk. Or just brush with water. For the fresh feeling just chew some spearmint leaves.


2

Try benadryl cream. If it stops the itch then you know it's a reaction with the shoe insole and you'll just need to replace the insole. If that doesn't work, try soaking your feet in a hot salt bath and then scrubbing the sole of your foot with a pumice stone. This will remove any skin that is contributing (by being rough, or dead, etc) If none of that ...


1

Chlorine Bleach is not good for wool. Found a solution that worked for me - phenolic disinfectant (Lysol) the web site also suggested Pine Oil (Pine Sol or Lysol Pine Action) http://laundry.about.com/od/handwashing/fl/How-to-Wash-Wool-Socks.htm Remember to also disinfect towels, shower shoes/sandals, etc as the athlete's foot fungus can spread via laundry ...


1

What its size should be with respect to number of people who are going to use it? I've found that you can dig one cathole and use it multiple times,(by the same person or multiple people), just dig a deeper hole (deeper but not wider). After each use, toss down a thin layer of dirt to "hide" the waste from other creatures. If it is attracting flies, then ...


1

Plantago major is not only a rough plant with strong leaves which grows technically everywhere, but also a useful herb. Try to find bigger leaves, perhaps not from the strict proximity of the road.



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