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14

Apart from the practical advantages mentioned in practicality of beards, there's also some aspects that are special to remote and/or high altitude trekking: Melting snow to obtain water costs a lot of fuel (and time) which makes water quite a valuable good. You don't want to spend 10% or more of your expensively molten water just to pollute it with shaving ...


10

I'll caveat this with -- I've never vomited in my gear, nor do I know anyone who has. But I did sit and figure out how I'd try to solve this if it happened to me. Dry the liquid. This will depend on gear and season. Sunshine, freezing cold, or dirt can all work for this. Even cooking materials such as flour can work. Anything to make it less liquid. ...


8

The first thing you need to ask yourself is why is there so much rubbish? Getting things up and down to Everest base camp is exhausting! The Sherpas (who do the vast majority of the lifting and carrying, and are typically not paid well) have no incentive to carry down things that the majority of their western clients don't ask about. Clients typically don't ...


7

Given that your water is clean I don't think cleaning the bottle is a major concern. Personally I would rinse a water bottle out with tap water before filling (or maybe once a day if using it lots) and only bother with soap if visibly dirty. Therefore I would say your suggestion is more than necessary but not excessive. For reference I fill my water bottle ...


6

Would have to agree. In the west we have been accused of being overly clean. after a few days you will likely reach some form of equilibrium with the mess. And while I don't recommend going more than a fortnight, its unlikely to be too much of a concern. Also it gives that first shower and shave after the trip an extra special "return to normal" feeling. ...


5

There's an inn/tea house/lodging at Gorak Shep. It's about 2-3 hours walk from the base camp. In 2004, when I was there, most of the villages and lodgings on the way to Everest had, at the very least, the possibility of a "hot bucket" shower, which is basically a closed room where a person with a bucket of hot water can clean themselves. I don't remember if ...


4

As long as the water you are filling it with is clean, it won't be the problem. What may cause an issue is your mouth. Human mouths are not especially clean, and while microorganisms are kept at bay in the mouth, they can start to multiply rapidly in water. I always recommend washing bottles once a day. As a simple, convenient and quick hygiene step it ...


4

As a beard wearer for many years (though not for ever) I would recommend not shaving. The practical benefits of not having to wet shave when water and energy are at a premium, let alone the logistics of carrying batteries for your trimmer are pretty obvious. The hygiene risk is actually slightly lower as you are not putting a sharp but not necessarily clean ...


3

If your water source is clean and assuming you are a relatively clean person in a fairly clean environment (not working in sanitation), You can probably get away with never cleaning it and not get sick. Tap water usually has some chlorine in it to keep basic bacteria and virus levels low. So refilling it with this water will keep the general levels low ...


2

Cleaning once a week may be slightly more than enough, but it is reasonable. Depending on your environment, there may be factors that cause the bottle to smell bad. Something I have learned from biking is to store the empty bottle in the freezer at night, or when not in use. Freezing kills a lot of things and prevents growth of mold/mildew. It has the ...


2

More important than the cleaning is, in my opinion the choice of the bootle. I switched to a bottle explicitly designed for a use like yours, in my case a Nalgene drinking bottle. My reasons for doing so: Health concerns: While I think there are regulations about what materials are allowed in drinking bottles, they have shown to be insufficient in many ...


2

Outdoor hair is full of sweat, but basically probably cleaner than the normal days. The air outdoor is much fresher than in the city. Probably we can skip the hair washing also prevent environment pollution but I would say You can try dry shampoo to clean your hair, you can look at this: http://facianohair.com/camping-outdoor Dry shampoo is easy to carry ...


2

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...


2

First of all, in the Netherlands camping in the wild is prohibited, and they really don't like it. Now you're in need for some water, first the good news, tapwater in the netherlands is filtered and ready to drink but like you said, you won't find much public water because of the expenses that are needed to get the water to a fountain (you have no ...


2

If you read the Snow Leopard, from Peter Matthiessen, he discusses this exact issue and looks at how the Tibetans handle it. Part of Buddhist teaching is that as human beings we are at one with nature, with earth, with our surroundings. Understand this carefully. We are no better than anything around us - we are part of it. So the Buddhists, just as Olin ...


1

I've wild-camped a few times in NL without problems. I guess it all depends on how well you hide and where you are. Can't really help for rural area's. But in less rural areas: Laundry: I'd expect laundry facilities for a few euro's in the poorer neighborhood of cities. Where students or immigrants live. Water/shower: some truck stops/gasoline stations ...


1

An absolutely vital part of my camping equipment is what we call the washing up bowl: a rectangular plastic tub that's smaller than a sink, but larger than your plates and pots. I actually take two or three, stacked inside each other. They serve many purposes at once: we keep all the kitchen bits and pieces (cutlery, cooking utensils, spices, little ...



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