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44

From a thermodynamics point of view, I'd say you should leave the water in. Temperature is a measure of the active kinetic energy of the molecules in a substance. Warming up is essentially the surrounding environment imparting some of its kinetic energy into the object being warmed up. Simply thinking about that, the more you have that needs warming, the ...


21

We (Kent and Deny) did an experiment in order to shed some light on this debate. We found that keeping the water in the cooler along with the ice kept the overall temperature of the cooler below 5 degrees Celsius for approximately 4 hours longer than when the water was removed. Experiment. We filled a Coleman cooler with 12 341mL bottles of Waterloo Dark ...


15

Never remove cold water from a cooler so long as the water is cooler than the outside temperature. Opening the lid allows more warm air in, but assuming the lid is on the top and air disturbance minimal, this could be a small loss of cooling / small entry of heat. Opening a drain will have to let warm air in to replace whatever cool water leaves the ...


11

This is what I found from the net: Flip the bottle up side down preventing the ice from forming near the top Obvious one: put the bottle inside a bag or a jacket use a heated hydration system instead adding electrolytes (suggested by Russell Steen)


10

EDIT: The more I consider this, the ambient air temperature around the cooler is the largest factor. Replacing water with 95F (35C) degree air will have a much larger impact than replacing water with 40F (4.4C) degree air. Actually, the answer is very simple because you asked longer, not colder. If you drain all the water, then when the ice all ...


10

You never want to stop yourself with the crampons because they are liable to catch, flip you over, and at best, put you in a worse situation than before, and at worst, break your legs. Instead you want to first stop yourself using the pick of the ice axe, with your crampons raised above the ice. You can use your knees as an additional brake. The way you do ...


5

When it's possible you will be crossing ice on your route, there is a couple of stages: Planning at home First of all, you should explore the area of your trip. The question is are the water sources frozen and how thick is the ice Small lakes in the forest, where there is no winds and no water flow, freeze first. If you know that a couple of small lakes ...


5

Although @ReverendGonzo gave a nice answer I want to start a little debate. There is no explicit answer to this question. Different alpine clubs have different opinions and even different mountain guides in one organization. That being said, I think the process described by @ReverendGonzo (which I will call default process) is very common and also the ...


4

I sometimes leave melted ice water in my cooler, which then gets into the food, making the food inedible. If my "food" is a can of beer, fine, leave the water in the cooler. If it's a sandwich, drain the water if it might get the sandwich wet. Or have the cans of beer at the bottom and put the sandwich on top to keep it out of the ice water. Another ...


3

The thermal conductivity of air is 0.000057 The thermal conductivity of water is 0.0014 Therefore water is 24.5 times more conductive than air, and has a temperature above 32 degrees Fahrenheit. The reason this is a problem is that bacteria can grow in that water quite quickly (within 6 hours) and start to make your food unhealthy to eat. Additionally all ...


3

You may have luck with a thermos flask, or similar insulated flask above a regular water bottle. If you're only going out for a day or so at a time the flask should keep the contents at a stable enough temperature so it doesn't freeze. For longer trips, you may need a more elaborate system with heating to stop the ice.


3

To expand on Steed's great answer, namely one point: If you have fallen into the water, it's very difficult to escape yourself I would go as far as to say it's often nigh on impossible, if you haven't been through any training, to get out of your own accord. You will panic, cold will set in quickly, you'll likely be in some form of shock from the cold ...


2

I use a "Camelbak Stoaway" bladder - it has a bit of insulation and neoprene on the tube. I fill it with warm water when possible and keep it next to my back. If not wearing it, I wrap my spare fleece around it on the 3 sides not facing my back. The only other two things not mentioned here about bladders, I think, are that I blow back the water after ...


2

You can use a Bottle Parka, which is basically a thin layer of foam that isolates the liquid from the outside temperature. Outdoor Research has a good one (Canadian website). Also in winter, when I melt snow, I put the water in the bottle when it's hot near boiling, so it stay liquid for more time. If you're gone a do overnight camping, you can dig a hole ...


2

As a rafter I have taken part in lots of discussions about this and couldn't resist any longer so have set up an experiment to test this. I hypothesize that the drained cooler will hold ice longer due to the insulating effect of air--as Snitse has described above. Convection will reduce air's effectiveness but, as Snitse points out, it is still far ...


1

Here is a different twist on the question of how to best use block ice. Before refrigeration northern states used to saw block ice fron frozen lakes and store for the summer in "ice houses", log houses that used only the thermal inertia of massive amounts of ice stacked together. We just returned from a 6 day canoe trip in which we used block ice to keep ...



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