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14

Yaktrax advertises products intended to help with this, which might be less damaging to interior surfaces than crampons. You can find some SE discussion on those kinds of products here. Keeping a low center of gravity can reduce probability of injury by reducing how far you fall. Positioning yourself so that if you do fall, a softer part of your body ...


7

This actually happens to be pretty relevant to Physics(so it's kind of odd it was migrated away from the Physics.SE). You were actually on the right track with the penguin idea and increasing your co-efficient of friction. The graphic in this article has been floating around the internet for a while now. It's pretty self-explanatory, but the gist of it is ...


7

Here at south Russia, we have lots of ice surfaces every winter and need to walk around. So, practical experience: The simplest option to reduce slipping will be to just glue some hard waterproof low-grit (approx 60-120 grit) sanding paper on the bottom of your shoes. This is often used here amongst aging people that are less agile due to their age. If ...


6

Are rubber soles the best alternative to heavy boots, or has anyone found another material that maximises friction with the ice? Rubber soles will have zero effect on ice. You need something that will dig into the ice to stop you slipping, rubber suffers from the same issues as any other material, it simply cannot get enough traction on the ice. ...


5

There's a lot that you can do in regards to walking style: Avoid walking on the ice if you can. (if it's a poorly cleared sidewalk, and there's snow on grass near it, walk in the snow) If it's a layer of ice over a base of snow, crack the ice by walking heel first (and really put your weight into it), so that you create footprints in the snow rather than ...


5

A quick online search shares a few tips which echo what I've heard from ice fishermen and experienced myself: Ice freezes first and thaws first at the edges, and these areas tend to be weaker. Knowing the terrain and where the shallows and weak spots are is important. Larger and more turbulent bodies of water take longer to freeze. If you're going to test ...


4

I am unfortunate in that our weather is warm and wet with a lot of melt/freeze cycles, and have lots of experience dealing with skiing on sheets of ice. here I am using "Ice" loosely to mean anything from true ice to hard packed snow you need razor sharp edges to stay upright and in control. Ice and snowboards don't make for a great day out, so avoiding it ...


4

You need between 3 and 4" of clear ice to be safe, but, with practice, you can visually determine if there is this amount or more. The key is that ice can support your weight in boots and not yet be safe for dynamic or concentrated loads (i.e. jumping or ice skating). The basic technique is that you first bash the edge of the ice (it is always thinnest at ...


3

In sweden, where skate touring is a popular winter sport, skaters bring a device called "ispik". (Ice pike). They come in two varieties. Either double pike, that looks like a sturdier version of a ski pole or a single pike that looks more like a broomstick with a tapered metal point. Generally speaking a single pike is easier to use but a double pike can ...


3

Good Ice Sounds obvious, but that's the answer, you need to learn how to identify good solid ice for all your screw placements. The best ice is the thickest ice you can find, so you can place your longest screws; clear and blue will be the most solid, while the worst ice is cloudy or brown, full of bubbles (aerated) and 'crunches' when you poke it, or has ...


3

If your aim is just to avoid falling, do as WBT suggests and get some ice-grips. These can be put on and removed in seconds and can be carried in a small bag or even a pocket. But if you get UK-type weather, in which ice is often patchy, avoid grips that use what look like steel springs. These are easily broken on hard surfaces like pavement. Better ...


3

Approaching this from a physics standpoint, the primary reason people slip on ice is due to low friction. I personally think this is not the case, but rather, the low friction is the gunpowder to the bullet that is sliding, but the trigger is not the low friction. The real trigger (in my opinion of course) is force. It is impossible to move without force, ...


2

My best solution for this is to wear a pair of flexible running shoes with spikes. The spikes are at the front; walk towards your toes to make sure the spikes dig in. Team them with warm socks for insulation (and remember a half-size larger than your normal shoes for comfort!) You can also get undersoles with spikes for ordinary shoes. Like as not, someone ...


2

Removing water from the cooler always means the ice lasts longer - solid (ice) transfers heat slowest, then gas (air inside cooler), then liquid (melted ice). This is explained by the Zeroteh Law of thermodynamics. All three work to achieve equilibrium by becoming the same temperature. Remove the fastest heat-transferring part and your ice lasts longer. ...


2

This is a great topic deserving of some controlled experimentation. In general the system is non-linear, but can be analyzed in a piece-wise linear fashion the same way many other difficult problems are approached. Some thoughts on the matter; 1)conduction not convection, is the main transport mechanism, 2)cold does not exist, only the absence of heat, 3) ...


2

Addition to ShemSeger's answer, from way back in my mind: A concave spot in the ice is stronger than a convex spot, given equal ice quality. The ice should be deeper than the screw is long, so the screw doesn't push the ice away from the rock.


2

So far, no one has stated the obvious: Don't step on ice! Walk on snow, bare pavement, rough ground, lawns, flowerbeds, or whatever alternatives there might be. When stepping on ice is unavoidable, here are some observations which can make slipping less likely: Ice is most slippery when it is at freezing temperatures (32 °F/ 0 °C). When it ...


1

Start at the edge and work your way out. The ice will usually be thinnest where the water flows INTO to pond or lake, and will be thickest close to the tail. That's because the ice is being pushed that way. Take samples as you work your way out onto the ice to continue to measure the thickness.


1

Emergency Method of Walking a Short Distance on Ice Without Slipping: If you find yourself on ice unexpectedly and you don't have far to go, an emergency option is to remove your shoes/boots entirely and walk in your stocking feet. This is obviously not a good idea if you're not going to be indoors within a couple of minutes, but if you're just walking ...


1

Not a real answer to your question, but maybe it helps. In Holland we use a lot of salt during the winter to lower the melting point of the snow/ice (as a result, we have an abundant salt water vegetation along highways even far inland). This may be a good solution around your home? When not meant for consumption, salt is very inexpensive (we pay like $2 for ...


1

I've been attending school in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA. We get ridiculous amounts of snow (for the US anyway) and ice. Generally, when I slip on the ice, my feet slide out from under me to my front, and I land on my behind. To counter this, I've learned to walk with shorter steps, keeping most of my weight on the balls of my feet as opposed to ...



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