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In sweden, where skate touring is a popular winter sport, skaters bring a device called "ispik". (Ice pike). They come in two varieties. Either double pike, that looks like a sturdier version of a ski pole or a single pike that looks more like a broomstick with a tapered metal point. Generally speaking a single pike is easier to use but a double pike can ...


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You need between 3 and 4" of clear ice to be safe, but, with practice, you can visually determine if there is this amount or more. The key is that ice can support your weight in boots and not yet be safe for dynamic or concentrated loads (i.e. jumping or ice skating). The basic technique is that you first bash the edge of the ice (it is always thinnest at ...


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A quick online search shares a few tips which echo what I've heard from ice fishermen and experienced myself: Ice freezes first and thaws first at the edges, and these areas tend to be weaker. Knowing the terrain and where the shallows and weak spots are is important. Larger and more turbulent bodies of water take longer to freeze. If you're going to test ...



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