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18

No, it is not safe to use denatured alcohol for two good reasons: Denatured alcohol refers to a class of ethanol produced for industrial uses that has been "denatured" which essentially means "made undrinkable" by mixing other compounds that are toxic or unpleasant to humans. The thing is, you, as the consumer, have no idea what exactly was mixed in. ...


10

Wilderness medicine protocols taught by the major Wilderness First Aid / First Responder training companies (and subsequently adopted by most outdoor organizations) are fairly standard and quite clear about wound management in the back-country. The standard accepted practice for treating a wound is: stop the bleeding - usually possible via direct ...


9

Roll top dry bags are fairly common. They are usually combined with either a pack cover or a pack liner. The pack liner is commonly an over-sized roll top dry bag placed inside your backpack. A cheaper option is to use a trash compactor bag as a pack liner. They are usually cheap and easy to find in the USA. Usually, the trash bag is put inside your bag ...


9

For hanging packs, you can use vines. Find a vine you than can bend almost double (the shape of those ribbon campaign ribbons) without it breaking. You can use those as is, until they dry out. If you need more weight, you can braid them. If you can't find vines, you can use new green bark off of smaller plants. If you can peel at least 12" of bark, you ...


8

If you didn't bring rope with you on purpose, you may still have shoelaces. You could use them in a bowdrill to make a fire in an emergency (but you better know how to make and use a bowdrill well beforehand). Two plants that make good cordage here in the Pacific Northwest are Stinging Nettle and Fireweed. You can use it fresh and green, but if you properly ...


7

First, I always have at least one shoe lace in my first aid kit (I know, not the most usual place, but I never forget it and it only needs a very small space). Also some piece of washing line (e.g. for drying clothes) can be used. If you don't have one of those, you can cut the other shoe lace and use half of it to lace your shoes every other hole. It will ...


7

There's a number of options for dealing with such an issue, each can be appropriate depending on the situation in hand. The wonders of paracord can come to the rescue if you have some on hand (and if not, why not!) It's usually a bit thicker than shoelaces but can squeeze through the holes and do the job surprisingly well. Depending on the length of the ...


5

I recommend reflective lines for at night, and standard flagging tape for during the day. Both are lightweight and the triptease line really jumps out at night when hit with a light.


4

I would try these options below in order, if you haven't already done so. Repair Contact the manufacturer or a retailer that sells that brand. There is a good chance they might fix them under warranty. I've had many good experiences with getting older equipment that you think might not be covered taken care of, but each brand varies on how far they'll go. ...


4

The method by which carabiners in any color are coated (either gate or body) is anodizing, which is going to be nearly impossible to sufficiently replicate with anything practical and cost-effective at home. With anodizing, the coating essentially becomes part of the aluminum itself. So anything you put on the gate will wear off relatively quickly and ...


4

Unfortunately nail polish would probably gunk up the locking mechanism. I wouldn't put nail polish on any moving piece of a carabiner. You can use nail polish to mark your gear so you know that it's yours (and not your partner's). You may be able to find a multi-color scheme that indicates the carabiner's date, but generally that's not an issue (if it ...


4

Nail polish is the way to go. Everyone I know, including myself, uses it to identify whose gear is whose.


4

I'll preface this by saying I've never tried this in a real world application myself, but I was curious and found some instructions for creating quick harnesses out of webbing from a web search. I want to add that I am in no way endorsing this for climbing or prolonged use beyond a static hang or an emergency situation. I've heard and read that ...


3

As Russell mentions, flagging tape can work well in this situation. I carry a roll in my first aid/survival kit, as it's also useful for marking your path if you're lost, among other uses. A more permanent and reflective alternative would be to get some type of reflective fabric and attach it to your fly. You could potentially sew it on, if you're not too ...


3

I always carry para chord with me. It can be used for building shelters, hanging food (to hide from bears), securing items to a back pack, staking down tents, and also it can be used as a shoelace. Para chord is usually made out of spectra or nylon (the same as climbing rope) and has a tensile strength of (usually) between 400 and 600lbf. So next time ...


3

You can use a fine sandstone with a little water on it. Sandstone works the best because of its fine grain and good abrasive quality. Using water smooths the sandstone surface. Drag the stone slightly diagonal away from the edge on one side Change the side with each stroke Check the sharpness with your thumbnail once a while Repeat If you can't find ...


3

Actually they can probably be fixed. For the cap there are two options with JB Weld that I have used. The first is described here, but basically consists of coating the original cap with JB Weld kwikplastic. The second is more complicated, but a better fix in my experience. First you have to coat the bottle nipple with a polyethylene lube, so ...


2

Real 550 cord (paracord) has an outer braid over multiple twisted strands of fiber (7, I think). If the cord is too thick, whack off a piece and pull out as many strands as you need to get the job done. It's incredibly versatile stuff and you probably should consider it basic survival gear. But make sure that it's the real deal. I'm not sure that a lot ...


2

To always have a duck tape with you in case something break (taken from here in french) Disadvantage: it is not biodegradable


2

These are actually so incredibly easy to get, it doesn't really warrant an answer, but here goes anyway: Because these sort of poles are the de-facto standard these days, they are available everywhere. A google search on tent pole replacement gives me two pages of shops, Amazon, GoOutdoors (and some ebay sales) All you need is the length, diameter and how ...


1

There is a description of this in Freedom of the Hills, around p. 149 in the edition I have. They describe it as an emergency alternative to a manufactured harness. Peter Croft also suggests using them intentionally for lightweight climbing, if you don't think the climb requires a harness, but you will want to rappel at some point. The basic idea is to make ...


1

If the only Problem is that the replacementpoles don't fit your grommets. i'd suggest you have to replace the grommets too. It doesn't look like 6.5mm poles would break, you'll have to keep in mind that in those 30years the materials also got alot better than back then. Another possibility is visit a tubingstore and find something similiar, alltough you ...


1

One trick is to get an aluminium tube the same size of the exiting one, about 3 inches long and slide it down over the split. A bit of glue or tape to hold it in place and you're good to go.


1

There are many folk and wild remedies you could learn, depending on what you're carrying & where you're hiking. Some examples: Honey will protect from infection. Spider webs will stop bleeding (for small cuts). Common plantain soothes burns, scrapes, etc. Chew it up to make a salve.



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