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13

I've helped a few friends make torches for medieval events they were hosting. As I was the only one who managed to burn themselves during assembly and testing, I feel somewhat informed, if a bit clumsy. Your choice of materials will depend on how long you want your torch to burn for, as well as how brightly. Specifically, your wick material and your fuel. ...


11

Stick hardwood 2 to 3ft long Wick (I guess that's suitable terminology) cotton rags Fuel lamp oil or in the context of a survival situation, animal fat.† Misc nails or fence staples Directions Soak the rags in the fuel Wrap the rags around the stick Fasten the rags to the stick with the nails, staples, or something similar. Apply fire ...


9

A cast is meant to promote long-term healing of a broken bone, and getting a cast typically requires a doctor in a definitive care environment. A splint is the preferred treatment for fractures and sprains in the field. The purpose of a splint is to immobilize the limb around the injury. A good splint should be well padded, comfortable for the patient, and ...


7

One of the most effective splinting materials is birch bark. Peel it off the tree just as you would if you were going to use it to make a canoe. It's very stiff, and it has some natural curl to it. Wrap it around the broken limb and you can use anything from triangular bandages to strips of torn clothing, duck tape, or even a sock to keep it in place. ...


6

(First of all: I'm not used to the english words here.) I think tillering trees refere to the contraptiosn you do mount on walls / something standing upright, using a string and a pulley. But you can easily do the same with just a tillering stick which is quite easy to fabricate, I think following images say more than I can say in words. All you need is a ...


6

This depends greatly on the situation at hand and there are enormous amounts of factors that will effect your decision to build in a specific location. For example, if you are in an extremely remote location and are more likely to be stranded for a long period of time, it may be more beneficial for you to seek shelter as a means of survival rather than ...


6

As principle behind this think about your old light bulb. One emergency method of lighting a fire used to be to break the glass of the light bulb in your flashlight and burn the filament, no more no less than the way its done with a strand of steel wool for example. Now, when you put the filament between positive and negative there will be some resistance in ...


6

So, from comments to answer: Back when I learned to build my own bows a guy in the club I belonged to used just a ledge and a baggie of lead weights (tire balancing stuff). I suppose you could reproduce it "in the wild" hanging from a branch and a bag of stones. However that guy was an expert that forgot more than Ill ever know about bow building and didnt ...


5

Having had to splint my own broken wrist in the wild, I do not suggest wasting time going for "natural" solutions to the problem. Sure, if something natural is there and better than what you have, go for it. Depending how far way, and how mobile the patient needs to be, will depend how much time you spend improvising. In my case a 30 minute walk through ...


5

Assuming that you are not going to use if for checking fever. There are other ways to check fever. There is no mechanism, or a piece of equipment (other than dedicated thermal transducers) I have heard of that can measure the temperature precisely. If you are just curious about how hot/cold the ambiance is, you can pull out your cellphone and get that ...


4

Two different kinds of wood, fiber from bark (to make the string and to hold the wood together while gluing), a knife or hatchet, pitch from a pine tree, fire to temper the wood. The stiff wood needs to be on the front of the bow, the less stiff on the back. Edit: if making a recurve, you need to soak the wood, and bend it opposite the direction you will ...


4

To answer your question, I can refer to this answer on this question. Check out point 5: 5. Tillering Hang the bow up horizontally on a branch or piece of scrap wood by the handhold. Now pull down a few inches on the string while observing how the limbs bend. Now, not only do you want each limb to bend evenly throughout its length, you also ...


4

Shelter is by far the most important initial consideration. Since you are stranded there anyway, you will have the opportunity to move your camp. Since you specify a tropical island, you want shelter from the sun more than anything else. You won't freeze to death in the tropics if you aren't on a mountain top. So in order of importance based on time before ...


3

Being a sailor rather than a rock climber, my familiarity is more with nylon 3 strand twisted ropes. With nylon twisted ropes, you can make ropes of any length without needing special splicing tools like you need for cored ropes like those used in climbing. I would buy 3/8 inch deck and anchor line, cut your favorite clasp off your preferred leash, and eye-...


3

I'm wondering if it would be possible make him a thicker long line with a decent clasp? For the clasp, any climbing karabiner will be strong enough to hang a car off; I'd suggest a screwgate to avoid accidental un-clipping. Other clips and clasps may be perfectly fine too, these are just the ones I'm familiar with and have around the house! If I were ...


3

I wouldn't use climbing rope, anyone that's ever caught a climbing rope that's running out will tell you it's not pleasant. It burns! Very painful. A lunge line would be much better. It should easily cope with the demands of rocks, etc. Climbing ropes are engineered to catch a falling human. Dogs are obviously much lighter and will typically not be having ...


3

In addition to the already given answers, I've found a in-depth guide on how to build a bow (full credit goes to Jason Knight). How to Make a Quickie Bow from a Sapling 1. Choosing wood The first step is to select the proper materials. Some of the best woods for making bows include osage orange, yew, ash, black locust, and hickory, though ...


1

You can build something that tells you when it's colder or warmer than something else, but without a gauge to help you create your graduations, you won't know what the actual temp is. I am not sure this is a necessary took however. The body tells you by its comfort level whether you need more or less heat, or more or less water when it's hot. You can also ...



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