Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

This might sound a bit daft - but you could be holding on to the rock too tightly. Your other questions indicate you might be pretty new to climbing, and it is common for beginners to make this mistake. Primarily, you should be climbing with your legs - pushing your weight up. Legs are used to your weight - arms, and fingertips, are not. If you are steady ...


16

The National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation says: Preventive Measures First, let it be said that there is no sure prevention. Necrotizing fasciitis has been known to be spontaneous. A bruise or abrasion are all the "opening" in the skin necessary for bacteria to enter. However, there are some things you can do decrease risk. The single ...


13

Self-assessment is difficult because your level of consciousness (LOC) may be impaired. Unfortunately, one's own state of mind is also very difficult to self-assess. I'll list here a brief overview of some of the "self-checks" you can do, but (as I'm sure you're already aware), getting a second person to check you out as soon as possible will help ensure you ...


12

Oh friend, I have been down this miserable road just like you. I'll tell you what's at the end of it: swelling of the synovial fluid in the finger joints (which if not reduced leads to arthritis), bone spurs in the knuckles, and a year off the rock. Here's the good news, though: I'm happily climbing again and my fingers don't hurt! The finger joint pain ...


11

Talked to my doc today during a visit for something else. It's Iliotibial Band Syndrome. The ligament that runs along the outside of the knee becomes irritated and inflamed. It's often caused by over-pronation and poor gait which is exacerbated on the weight bearing leg (not the landing leg) when going downhill. Once injured, the only good solution is ...


10

I have suffered pretty badly from these on a couple long hikes. Here's my best suggestions from my experience: If at all possible stop hiking for a week (I know the scenario you set up precludes this ). Assuming for the rest of these you have to keep going: Whenever you stop, lie down with your feet up. If a cold stream is nearby, sticking your legs ...


9

Factors you can't easily control Some factors that you can't easily control play a clear role. These include genetics, being overweight,[Theisen] or having a previous injury. For example, people who want to lose weight may run in order to burn calories; they can't necessarily lose the weight before they start running so as to reduce their chance of getting ...


8

Not really. Not the answer you want, but your body is telling you something, you need to listen to it. It's a lot of fun, but you need to take it slow to ease your body into it. Otherwise the fun is going to come to an end. I've heard a lot of stories from people that buy things like these: http://shop.nicros.com/index.php/warrior-boardtm.html then go ...


8

Rather than try to answer the personal part of your question, which as Liam said needs a doctor's attention to answer properly, I shall reply to the more general title: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? In an absolute sense I do not believe it can be. In a relative sense it is caused high stress on these "pulleys" so avoiding hard use ...


7

For wounds with heavy bleeding or that are deep, the standard practice is to: Apply direct pressure to the wound. Elevate the injury to decrease blood flow. In short, if the flow of blood is high enough that it won't clot then you want to impede the output by whatever means possible. As mentioned elsewhere, tourniquets are a last resort, where the lose ...


6

Having suffered similar on a marathon I had to run in freezing rain once (ending up with not just large areas with the skin chafed off entirely, but also deep cuts into my thigh muscles from the stitching!) I can heartily recommend combining very supportive underwear with non-slip, stretch leggings. This way the only rubbing will be between the underwear ...


6

I have experienced the same when trail running. I can pretty consistently reproduce the symptoms on downhill stretches when running distances that are much longer than my regular runs, when starting to hit the trails again after not running for a while, and when running downhill at a faster pace than I would run uphill. The following is my hypothesis, ...


6

The best practice for climbing is to actually go climbing. I have wasted both time and money experimenting with training setups at home for practicing climbing, and I have mostly been disappointed. Since then I have transitioned my efforts at home to staying in shape for climbing (slightly different from what you are asking.) Unless you want to spend ...


5

Rest? Sometimes this kind of pain can be a sign of overtraining. In the question, the poster doesn't say how frequently he climbs, or how long he's been climbing, so its hard to formulate an exact recommendation. If you're just feeling a tremendous amount of lower-grade soreness, try reducing the numbers of days a week you climb. I have friends that ...


5

Holding on to crimpers is what causes pain in my finger-joints. This is from the Metolius website where they give instructions for hang-board training: "Avoid using crimp or cling grips. A very important aspect concerning any hold is how you hold on to it. It is extremely important that you do not use any kind of cling technique regularly." I have ...


5

In addition to the suggestions above, regular use of walking or trekking poles are a great help in alleviating knee and hip problems.


4

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? ...


4

I think there have to be two parts to the answer: If you are in an immediately life-threatening situation where you have to act in order to survive, then the only thing that can save you when you are mentally shaken is training and routine. You can train dangerous situations in a safe environment so that when they occur for real, you know what you have to ...


4

I've had this, too. You're just stressing different ligaments than when traveling uphill. I think it's a matter of getting the right exercise, which is to say, do the same thing on training hikes. I've also experienced pain in that area after crossing an ice-cold creek, then hiking after. Alleve is my drug of choice since I can take it at the beginning of ...


4

Due to the nature of many injuries your awareness and ability to treat yourself may be impaired. Therefore, extra care should be taken. Don't do anything rash or hastily as that will probably just make things worse. Take a few moments to collect yourself and get an initial impression of how you feel. Your first concern is to prevent further injury and get ...


3

Listening to your body is spot on. Let the finger heal completely before climbing again. This is very important, as a split tip is very likely to split in the same spot again. Prevention is very important, and will help keep tips from splitting in the future. Start by moisturizing the skin regularly, especially after climbing. Use products like Climb ...


3

There's a strap called Cho Pat that my dr. told me about -- it helps immensely.


3

Find yourself a good deep tissue massage therapist who specializes in things like carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, and thoracic outlet syndrome; someone who knows the muscles well enough to address these concerns will know the muscles well enough to massage the muscles of a climber. Just be prepared for to hurt a bit; just like every other muscle, the tiny ...


3

I suffered from chaffing for years and tried a whole range of options. What I found that worked best is the Under Armour Original Boxer Jocks, the 9" version. They cover most of the thigh and holds well enough to keep everything separated to avoid the chaffing. I get them from USA when they go on sale, but Wiggle, SportShoes and others stock them. If a ...


2

Yes, stop climbing. You're connective tissues are not ready for it. Active rest (easy climbing/easy training) and rehab/prehab for your fingers, wrists, forearms, and upper body in general will help. Look at it this way, however long you have had the injury/been feeling pain, you will need to rest and rehab your joints/connective tissue for the same amount ...


2

I just got back from hiking Inyo county Bishop Ca. area call Sage flat and when coming down my outside knees began to hurt and by the time we got down it was hard to take steps. I hoped over night it would feel better so i could hike the next day, It did and we decided to take the lower trail which is flatter but again coming back i started to feel my knee ...


2

"tight bandage/band" = Tourniquet. An emergency tourniquet is generally used as a last resort, especially in civilian applications, for all blood flow below the application of an emergency tourniquet is stopped, and can subsequently kill the tissue, leading to eventual loss of the limb below application. Never attempt to apply a tourniquet unless you are ...


2

On any British Red Cross first aid course, given a conscious casualty scenario; the aid giver is taught to reassure the casualty. What I think you are asking is. How do I reassure the casualty, and ensure that their mental state is not going to impede rescue or add further risk to health? Furthermore you are stating that the casualty and the aid giver are ...


2

As a runner, I use Body Glide to prevent chafing. It works like a charm. Even if I put it on early (say, before driving to a race) it stays well enough to protect me. It is a little on the pricey side, and I've read that you can get the same effect from Aquaphor, so you may want to experiment.


2

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible