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13

Self-assessment is difficult because your level of consciousness (LOC) may be impaired. Unfortunately, one's own state of mind is also very difficult to self-assess. I'll list here a brief overview of some of the "self-checks" you can do, but (as I'm sure you're already aware), getting a second person to check you out as soon as possible will help ensure you ...


6

Having suffered similar on a marathon I had to run in freezing rain once (ending up with not just large areas with the skin chafed off entirely, but also deep cuts into my thigh muscles from the stitching!) I can heartily recommend combining very supportive underwear with non-slip, stretch leggings. This way the only rubbing will be between the underwear ...


4

I think there have to be two parts to the answer: If you are in an immediately life-threatening situation where you have to act in order to survive, then the only thing that can save you when you are mentally shaken is training and routine. You can train dangerous situations in a safe environment so that when they occur for real, you know what you have to ...


4

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? ...


4

Due to the nature of many injuries your awareness and ability to treat yourself may be impaired. Therefore, extra care should be taken. Don't do anything rash or hastily as that will probably just make things worse. Take a few moments to collect yourself and get an initial impression of how you feel. Your first concern is to prevent further injury and get ...


3

Find yourself a good deep tissue massage therapist who specializes in things like carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, and thoracic outlet syndrome; someone who knows the muscles well enough to address these concerns will know the muscles well enough to massage the muscles of a climber. Just be prepared for to hurt a bit; just like every other muscle, the tiny ...


3

I suffered from chaffing for years and tried a whole range of options. What I found that worked best is the Under Armour Original Boxer Jocks, the 9" version. They cover most of the thigh and holds well enough to keep everything separated to avoid the chaffing. I get them from USA when they go on sale, but Wiggle, SportShoes and others stock them. If a ...


2

As a runner, I use Body Glide to prevent chafing. It works like a charm. Even if I put it on early (say, before driving to a race) it stays well enough to protect me. It is a little on the pricey side, and I've read that you can get the same effect from Aquaphor, so you may want to experiment.


2

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...


2

I just got back from hiking Inyo county Bishop Ca. area call Sage flat and when coming down my outside knees began to hurt and by the time we got down it was hard to take steps. I hoped over night it would feel better so i could hike the next day, It did and we decided to take the lower trail which is flatter but again coming back i started to feel my knee ...


2

Yes, stop climbing. You're connective tissues are not ready for it. Active rest (easy climbing/easy training) and rehab/prehab for your fingers, wrists, forearms, and upper body in general will help. Look at it this way, however long you have had the injury/been feeling pain, you will need to rest and rehab your joints/connective tissue for the same amount ...


2

On any British Red Cross first aid course, given a conscious casualty scenario; the aid giver is taught to reassure the casualty. What I think you are asking is. How do I reassure the casualty, and ensure that their mental state is not going to impede rescue or add further risk to health? Furthermore you are stating that the casualty and the aid giver are ...


1

It's next to impossible to answer your question in a classic "if this/then this" kind of format. There are so many variables and factors that would contribute to choosing what a priority is in any situation like this one. Many will try to "armchair" a situation like this, but really, it's better to have a "toolbox" full of useful skills and techniques that ...


1

Two things come to mind above all else Keep your mind & wits about you Water With these two you can survive a ton of scenarios. Stay alert, don't let panic set-in, maintain a positive mindset and stay hydrated as much as you can. If you can do those above all else then good things will happen.



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