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24

A lot of factors go into choosing a backpacking knife, but I will break it down into four categories: weight cost survival utility your surroundings Weight There are a lot of high-quality knives out there in the 1-3 ounce range. The most experienced “ultra-lightweight backpacker” I know recommends the Spyderco Dragonfly ($50). With only a 2-inch blade ...


12

You really want a saw or camp axe for this purpose, but if using a knife you want one without serrations. Serrations are not a replacement for a saw. A saw cuts a kerf wider than the blade itself so it (with skill) doesn't jam. Serrations are usually placed near the handle which is exactly where you don't want them because this is where you have the most ...


12

Laws vary greatly by region, and are subject to being changed at any time. That being said, there are a few sites I used when looking up the knife laws in California. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knife_legislation Provides a good overview of knife laws, but did not provide the specifics I need. It's worth browsing the sources that they reference however. ...


8

There's no simple answer to this question - everybody has their own preferences. (That being said, I'm a big fan of my straight edge SOG SEAL Pup Elite and would highly recommend it). There are a few simple guidelines, though. I'd suggest something with a (1) thick full-tang blade, so you could chop down some small trees if needed. But (2) not too big, so ...


8

The only advantage I see to a folding knife is its size when collapsed. I always carry a folding knife in my pocket, but when hiking I have a fixed blade strapped to my pack. I prefer to use my fixed blade for batoning, both for safety reasons, and the fact that it has a wider blade which can give you more penetration. Here is my EDC folder: And my fixed ...


8

While it can be useful if you are really out in the wilds, say in the Amazon jungle, and using a machete to clear every step, I wouldn't expect to carry a knife sharpener for a trip under a week. For short, non-jungle expeditions, A swiss army knife with a couple of blades is often enough for most people. To summarise - it can be necessary for longer ...


7

I am not a lawyer, or an expert on California knife laws. This post is based on my understanding of state laws both as written, and as summarized by other sites. This is the summary website that I used to determine what to carry here in southern California. http://www.ninehundred.net/~equalccw/knifelaw.html#SECTION TWO It tries to decrypt the legal speak ...


7

Time-tested bushcraft designs look like this: Fallkniven F1 Woodlore Bushcraft Northwest Spyderco Bushcraft Classic but less bombproof (because of the lack of a full shank): Puukko Mora


6

Flat-edge knives are the best choice for wilderness and campsite activities. A lot of times you have to use beating stick to split wood and that will dull out any serration you might have anywhere on the knife. Serrated knives (and partially serrated) come in handy in suburban environment where you have to cut man made materials like plastic and rubber. ...


6

Serrations are formed on one side due to the method of manufacture (a formed grinding wheel). I suppose it would be possible to grind serrations from both sides with very careful alignment but I cannot recall seeing this on any production knives. Single-side or "chisel grind" blades not restricted to serrated knives. Nearly all traditional Japanese knives ...


6

The type of oil surely matters. Within petroleum products, thick, waxy Cosmoline has proven to be effective, but it's not nice to remove. (I've never personally used it for this reason.) I have recently learned of and started using Fluid Film. It has an unusual (to me) wool-lanolin base. I have limited experience with it and I have not yet conducted my ...


6

It can, yes - by keeping water and oxygen away it can greatly slow or prevent the oxidisation process from occurring. However, I wouldn't necessarily advise it as the best approach. Instead I'd advise making sure tools are clean and thoroughly dry, then storing them in a cool dry place (unless the manufacturer recommends otherwise of course.) There's two ...


6

Personally, I like the hilted CRKT Special Forces M16-13SFG - it has Veff serrations that cut better than normal serrations & has an extremely tight clip that is made to attach to all kinds of things, from webbing to pockets to even climbing harnesses. From the description: All knives in this series are equipped with clip options that allow ...


5

I have never taken an axe or hatchet camping with me, and I canoe-camp and car camp where space and weight are far less an issue than they are for hikers. In addition to weight and space there is the safety issue using a heavy tool that you swing hard. I use a folding saw (and carry spare blades) and it does whatever I need. I cannot split large logs with ...


5

I really don't find any specific need to carry something which is so heavy and bulky, and something that can cause injuries due to unsafe packing, unsafe way of carrying, unitended mishandling, when you have a fairly safer substitute for that. I have used one such fixed-blade knife for from cutting woods to making a make-shift raft. You may (may God not put ...


5

The Camillus Rescue Heat is nice, if you can find one. The link above is to a video review on YouTube. It covers things pretty well, but my own summary: Non-stabbing thick blunt tip is useful for prying and more safe The fully serrated blade works much better than the serrated part of a combo edge A recurve helps you cut rope at arms length (though not ...


5

I entirely agree with Timothy Strimple. Here are the pro-s and con's that I have noticed. Fixed blade: sturdy - good for batoning, chopping, hammering with the handle reliable - there is no mechanism to get jammed, screws to fall out can be very cheap - a cheap folder falls to peices in one month (in my experience). The only drawback of a cheap fixed ...


5

If your primary concern is "a knife I can quickly get out with just one hand" then you may want to look at better folding knives instead. A modern folding knife should not be difficult to open with one hand. If you need a fixed blade knife for other reasons I suggest you seek out (have made) a sheath that is leather-over-Kydex construction. Kydex by ...


4

The traditional standard is the USMC Ka-Bar knife. Generally I look for Fixed Blade Five to Seven inch blade Durable (full-tang) Assuming you're going survival, whatever you choose needs to be able to fulfill the following roles. General purpose cutting (rope etc.) Fell small trees Spear point


4

It's not necessary, but something that you probably would want to carry, especially if you plan on using your knife much. Buy a diamond file, very small & lightweight, and you can resharpen your knife with little effort. I like to use something like this to keep my knives sharp: EZE-LAP L PAK Set SF/F/M Color Coded Diamond Hones I typically ...


4

One point missing from the current answers: Fixed blade is absolutely essential in any situation where seconds count in emergency life-or-death situations. For example, anything taking place in or under water where you might need to free yourself (or another) from an entrapment. In these situations, you also want one with a secure but quick-release sheath. ...


3

What you want to do is find a good knife, that is partially serrated, so that you can have the choice of cutting things with the serrations or without... I personally recommend the CRKT M16-10KZ (EDC) or another knife of the M16 line, as they cut small trees/shrubs quite easily. I've used the M16-10KZ (3" blade) to cut stuff like this before and it does it ...


3

You can use a fine sandstone with a little water on it. Sandstone works the best because of its fine grain and good abrasive quality. Using water smooths the sandstone surface. Drag the stone slightly diagonal away from the edge on one side Change the side with each stroke Check the sharpness with your thumbnail once a while Repeat If you can't find ...


3

This is sort of an obvious answer, but if you're worried about a knife slipping out of (or cutting through) a cheap sheath, then get a knife with a better sheath. The traditional outdoors knife here in Finland is the puukko, usually worn in a leather sheath that grips the handle by friction, with an internal wooden last that protects the leather from ...


3

I would suggest using a Kydex or plastic sheath. You can also buy Kydex inserts for your leather/nylon etc. sheaths as well. According to Grant Lamontagne at the Multitool.org Forum: The nice thing about kydex and other plastic type sheaths are that they usually attach to the guard of the knife, meaning that any impact force isn't on the blade through a ...


3

Have you thought about using a dedicated rope/clothing/harness cutter like one of the Benchmade rescue hooks? I carry around the 8 model which is pretty good with insulating gloves but for rock there's the model 5 which is a ring handle and has a hard sheath/necklace method for wear.


3

For an all-around knife I'd tend to stay away from a serrated knife, myself. Serration is nice for cutting rope and, um, I think that's pretty much it. You'd shred a fish or small game with that thing. I'm having a hard time understanding why someone would need that particular knife. Why not something like a puukko knife?


3

Canada does not really have any hard and fast rules, with regard to knives. Specifically, except for lists of a few specifically banned styles they do not even mention them. And something that must be kept at the top of your mind at all times is that a knife is not necessarily a weapon. There are specific lists and descriptions, but suffice it to say you ...


3

My money goes to a Mora knife for all around usage and cost. And very very sharp right from the factory. $12 - $20 is not bad at all. I ended up buying the Mora Heavy Duty recently which is much thicker than the regular line up. One problem with the HD is that there is a very slight bevel on the back of the spine which makes it difficult if you are looking ...


2

An axe is (when used properly) just as safe as any knife. On long hikes where I know campfires are gonna be a must I do actually carry a small hatchet. My axe has a fairly long handle and weights just about 0.5kg. There are smaller and lighter ones, but a light head and long handle means less to carry when walking and more leverage when using it. For ...



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