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27

That is a "punch/reamer". It allows your to repair leather (for example). You thread a thread of something though the hole and then use the sharp end to punch/push the thread though leather. In this way you can repair boots, etc.


22

It is a "reamer with sewing eye", according to the Victorinox Swiss Army Knife Manual (PDF). It is used for punching holes in leather or canvas and can also used to get a thread through the hole, according to SAKWiki


21

The tool has two purposes. As a punch, it acts as a large needle. You can use it to sew leather or canvas, as mentioned in the other answers. Punch the tool through your fabric, put thread through the hole, retract the tool, repeat. As a reamer, the non-uniform blade shape allows you to make quite good circular holes in plastic or wood. Punch the tool ...


10

As a kid we often went on hiking trips and I got my first knife when I was around eight to ten years old. Below are some of the things my parents looked out for when I was a child. Obviously this is addressed at an even younger age than OP described, so you might have to adapt it accordingly... General advice For beginners either get a fixed blade, or one ...


8

You are right about using the rough side first and then some polishing with the finer side. Holding an angle is a real tricky part and needs some stability and skill. To prevent the blade from getting damaged, you can run an ink marker over the cutting bevel. This way you'll have a reference to manage the amount of tilt you need to have. The typical angle ...


7

A multi-tool or a knife? A multi-tool can be a very appropriate tool for backpacking. It combines the function of many of the tools you mentioned. You may carry the tools you mention above, though. (Note: I've NEVER needed a bottle opener...) If you mean a knife, read on... I do a lot of backpacking in the Eastern US, so I am going to assume that this ...


6

My advice is to always use the entire length of the the stone, to make sure wearing is even, and it's easier to be slow and steady. Also, some good information on cooking.SE. How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a ...


5

I bring a very small pocket knife with me when I'm backpacking (or whatever they call the activity in Europe...?) As you say, it's convenient because it combines several tools in one. You don't really need three big, heavy pieces of silverware. What works for me is a spoon as my main thing to cook and eat with, plus the pocket knife for tasks like cutting ...


5

This answer is going into a slightly different direction than fgysin's one since I just noticed that your question is about activities, not technique itself. My suggestions might be obvious to some, but this is what I would teach (and how I learned handling knives): making a "spear" (or improvised trekking pole, if you prefer) from sticks, i.e. remove the ...


3

I carry a Victorinox knife. On my last few trips I've used the various tools on it to pry shellfish off rocks, slice cheese and salami, prepare vegetables, cut sticking plaster, cut duct tape for gear repair, cut cloth to make a dressing, open packets of dehydrated food neatly. I have, in the past, used the wood saw on it to clear windfall. It did the job ...


3

Ray Mears has produced videos on sharpening knives. In particular, sharpening them in camp and in the field. The teqhnique is pretty much as @WedaPashi explains it, but it's good to see a video of the correct approach.


2

Honestly it's pretty tricky. The other answers have good info but I thought I'd add a tip: Once you think you've found the correct angle, you can use your thumb on the back of the blade as a guide to keep it at this angle against the stone. Rest the bottom of your thumb on the stone as you move the knife across it and it will keep the knife at a fairly ...


2

First, there are some misconceptions about knives: There is no such thing as an all-purpose knife. A knife's blade shape, steel, length, weight, type and angle of edge all determine what a knife is best at. While it surely will do other cutting tasks, it will never excel there. Take a BRKT Bravo 1, for example. It is an excellent knife for heavy duty ...


2

You sharpen the secondary / backbevel (the 15 degrees) when you do not get that hair-popping sharpness form the 20 degree angle. Or you use the 15 degrees to get a knife with a thick bevel to razor-sharpness and then use the 20 degrees afterwards. I think the CD that comes with the sharpmaker has some more hints. A visual for your target bevel from ...


1

I used to carry a multi-bladed knife when doing very long hikes. I eventually put it in my car where I found many uses for it like cutting off tags on newly purchased clothes. I think I own the knife because I think it is cool to own. : ) The only useful tool on a folding knife might be the small blade that allows you to make holes in things. I think it is ...


1

I live in Canada (undisclosed area) and yes even in the capitol u can carry a knife from 4-6. The laws are clear and police (-if not corrupt) few will want a good reason for why you are carrying one. Now obviously you are not going to be prancing around showing off your knife. Likewise to what was said about looking normal and staying normal in ie: public ...


1

Beta Titanium? Good luck (and I really mean luck) with sharpening it. Unless you are a pro knife sharpener, I doubt you will get any halfway decent edge on it once it got dull. For the requirements you describe and the money you are willing to pay, I suggest getting a BRKT Bravo 1, designed as a survival knife for and with the now defunct Marine Corps Force ...



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