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48

Tying knots is actually a bit of an art. Depending on what you need it for, there are knots that slide, create loops, tighten under load, and do tons of other things. Here are some backcountry essentials: Bowline Knot: Use this when you need a knot that absolutely, positively will not slip (unless loaded wrong). When I was in camp, we'd use these when ...


23

The most important knots you'll ever need to know are the taut-line hitch and the bowline. For instance, on your bear bag, you would tie a bowline through a handle or other loop the bag, and then the taut-line on the other side. The best thing about a bowline is that no matter how much force you've put on it, you can crack it easily to take it apart.


16

Here is an article from Scoutin magazine Knots and Boy Scouts go together like campfires and cobbler. Here’s how to tie three of the knots required to reach First Class, plus four more that can be very useful. Knots. It all begins with rope — different sizes, lengths, widths, and strengths, depending on its use. Ropes used for climbing can bear more ...


16

The bowline knot is very safe if loaded correctly. This is the usual, safe way to load it: The chair foot is the body (sorry for not offering naked models), the part of the rope leading away from the picture will take the load. In this use case the knot should hold perfectly. On the other hand, you might get the idea to use the bowline knot to create a ...


14

Most climbers use a re-threaded figure 8. The knot is not that important, though. In reading many accident reports, I have never seen one where the knot came untied or where there was a rope failure due to the knot on the harness. Pick a knot you're very familiar with, check it, and you're done. Spend more time checking belay devices, locking caribiners, ...


13

I believe the conventional way is to use a double (triple) fisherman's bend. This has the advantage of being and relatively compact. The main disadvantage is that it can be hard to undo if you need to. Other options include the figure of 8 bend which is bulkier than the fisherman's but easier to untie. You could also use a (double) sheet bend or even a ...


11

A Sheet Bend is designed for joining two lines of different size. If you need additional security use the Double Sheet Bend http://www.animatedknots.com/sheetbend/


10

Picture worth thousand words:


8

The knot reduced the runner rating in half, but since there are two strands , its back to the UIAA standard of 22KN ... The 22kN rating is for the loop strength of the sling, not the single-strand strength. Therefore any reduction in strength caused by a knot puts the strength below the 22kN standard. Stated strength for a girth hitch varies from ...


8

In the context of rock climbing, compared to a figure-8 knot, bowlines are: About as strong under ideal circumstances BUT: Can come untied on their own when unloaded Are more difficult to visually inspect (important, because climbers frequently rely on partners to check their knots, and may be tying and untying knots when they're tired and / or ...


8

I use the (double) Fisherman's knot for such cases. It's easy to tie and has a clear and concise form (easy to check if done right). As already mentioned in nivag's answer, it can be hard to untie if it was heavily loaded. One of its drawbacks is that it is not applicable for webbing as it is not possible to tighten it there to be stable. Here the waterman ...


8

It's what @imsodin said. Bloqueur is the french term for "blocker" in English. So when I talk about a bloqueur, I'm talking about blocking devices. The two that I use for ascending a rope are the Petzl basic and Petzl croll. The use of French terms is a habit that I picked up from canyoning, which is by origin a French sport, so most of the terms used there ...


8

For what purposes? For 'general' purpose, you should be able to get by just fine by making a bight in your line, then tying any knot you'd normally use in your situation using the bight as your line. This is known as tying a knot 'in the bight'. For example, the classic bowline could be used with the rope doubled up (aka; a double bowline), as can two half ...


7

@Shawn has already answered the question, but I would like to add that it whilst it may be useful in some situations, it can be a bad habit to get into, and dangerous in certain situations. As you can see in this video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auj4T1PYSRI - it involves getting your arm very tangled into the rope. If the rope was to suddenly be ...


7

Yes it is possible. There are many methods, but here is one I found by googling "single handed bowline knot" (first result): http://www.animatedknots.com/bowlineonehand/index.php


7

By coincendince, I asked the same question to a guide last weekend. His response was this: There is going to be some reduction in the strength of the webbing from the girth hitch. Especially thinner materials like dynemma. Its going to be minor, but still there. Its possible to carry a small number of slings (2 or 3) over your shoulder, with 1 carabiner ...


7

Coming from a climbing and industrial rope access background, the double fisherman's is the recommended way to make a loop using rope/cord. Undoing the knot was never part of the question, however under body weight loading even this shouldn't be too difficult. The figure of eight would work equally as well, I'd use it more for joining ropes for long ...


7

They are examples of a round turn and two half hitches. Sometimes known as an anchor hitch or a fisherman's hitch. http://www.animatedknots.com/roundturn/index.php?Categ=boating A Useful Boating Knot: A Round Turn and Two (or more) Half Hitches (ABOK # 1720, p 296) is useful for attaching a mooring line to a dock post or ring although probably less ...


7

As Freedom of the Hills also states: "Mechanical ascenders are stronger, safer, faster, and less tiring." – Freedom of the Hills The key advantage in there being, "less tiring", yes you could save a couple hundred grams by not carrying ascenders and instead using some prusiks, but how much do those weight savings benefit you after you've ascended ...


7

Knots by Grog say: If you are asked to learn to tie the Sheepshank, please request your Troop Leader to eliminate this knot and replace it with something safe and useful, e.g., the Alpine Butterfly Loop is an excellent way of creating a loop in the middle of a length of rope and can also be safely used to shorten a rope. So it sounds like you ...


6

The knot(s) I would use are: Bowline knot to one side of the rack Throw line over object, under rack, then back over object. Use truckers hitch, backed up with 2-3 reversing half hitches. If there is a lot of slack, make a daisy chain and tie off with a fisherman's Make sure to perform this process for the front and the back of the object. Check that ...


6

Here is nice site with animation: http://www.apparent-wind.com/knots/bowline/


6

In addition to zoul's excellent answer, the Bowline has another drawback in that it can come loose (or even undone) after repeated load/unload cycles (i.e. weighing and unweighing the rope).


6

First things first: Please be careful when rock climbing. Learning information on the internet is no substitute to proper training from an experienced and knowledgeable guide. Please don't use this information to put yourself in a situation where you may be in danger. That said You will need around one arms span of rope (about 1m). First ...


6

I alternate between the double fisherman's (which everyone has already talked about) and the flat overhand. Lately I've been leaning towards the flat overhand. The benefit of the flat overhand is that it's much easier to tie, inspect, and (most importantly) untie after it's been loaded. When properly tied and dressed, the flat overhand has been shown to be ...


6

How about a Figure 8 Bend? Easy to untie even under heavy load. We use them all the time in rock climbing.


6

The clove hitch is probably what you're looking for. You can even tie it directly on the branch/beam/bar without worrying about adding a carabiner. You could also tie it to the carabiner, adjust the length, and clip the carabiner to something else. The clove hitch is one of the most under-utilized climbing knots out there. It's infinitely adjustable because ...


6

I can only assume, that it derives from bloquer which is french for blocking. What the "c" is doing in there I have no clue - but then, I am not a native french speaker. In this case there are several devices that are generally used for this: There is Petzls Tibloc, a very light device. But it is also very aggressive and may damage the rope so it has to ...


6

Slippery versions of knots/hitches are very useful in many applications, but have limited use in climbing. But there is one application for which I often use a slippery overhand knot. In Sport climbing When I'm cleaning a sport route and need to rappel, I'll tie a slip knot in the rope (before I untie myself from the rope) and clip it to my harness so that ...



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