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37

Tying knots is actually a bit of an art. Depending on what you need it for, there are knots that slide, create loops, tighten under load, and do tons of other things. Here are some backcountry essentials: Bowline Knot: Use this when you need a knot that absolutely, positively will not slip (unless loaded wrong). When I was in camp, we'd use these when ...


18

The most important knots you'll ever need to know are the taut-line hitch and the bowline. For instance, on your bear bag, you would tie a bowline through a handle or other loop the bag, and then the taut-line on the other side. The best thing about a bowline is that no matter how much force you've put on it, you can crack it easily to take it apart.


13

Most climbers use a re-threaded figure 8. The knot is not that important, though. In reading many accident reports, I have never seen one where the knot came untied or where there was a rope failure due to the knot on the harness. Pick a knot you're very familiar with, check it, and you're done. Spend more time checking belay devices, locking caribiners, ...


12

The bowline knot is very safe if loaded correctly. This is the usual, safe way to load it: The chair foot is the body (sorry for not offering naked models), the part of the rope leading away from the picture will take the load. In this use case the knot should hold perfectly. On the other hand, you might get the idea to use the bowline knot to create a ...


7

@Shawn has already answered the question, but I would like to add that it whilst it may be useful in some situations, it can be a bad habit to get into, and dangerous in certain situations. As you can see in this video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auj4T1PYSRI - it involves getting your arm very tangled into the rope. If the rope was to suddenly be ...


6

First things first: Please be careful when rock climbing. Learning information on the internet is no substitute to proper training from an experienced and knowledgeable guide. Please don't use this information to put yourself in a situation where you may be in danger. That said You will need around one arms span of rope (about 1m). First ...


6

In the context of rock climbing, compared to a figure-8 knot, bowlines are: About as strong under ideal circumstances BUT: Can come untied on their own when unloaded Are more difficult to visually inspect (important, because climbers frequently rely on partners to check their knots, and may be tying and untying knots when they're tired and / or ...


6

By coincendince, I asked the same question to a guide last weekend. His response was this: There is going to be some reduction in the strength of the webbing from the girth hitch. Especially thinner materials like dynemma. Its going to be minor, but still there. Its possible to carry a small number of slings (2 or 3) over your shoulder, with 1 carabiner ...


6

The knot(s) I would use are: Bowline knot to one side of the rack Throw line over object, under rack, then back over object. Use truckers hitch, backed up with 2-3 reversing half hitches. If there is a lot of slack, make a daisy chain and tie off with a fisherman's Make sure to perform this process for the front and the back of the object. Check that ...


5

A stopper knot is not a specific knot, but a technique fo preventing a rope from sliding through a loop or hole. Common knots used for a stopper knot are: Overhand knot Double overhand knot Figure-of-eight knot Stevedore knot Ashley's stopper knot


5

The Ashley Book of Knots (published 1944) references the outside bowline as "inferior" but just says weakness nothing specific. In America the "outside" bowline is often called the "Dutch" bowline or Cowboy Bowline. So since, you ask, why is the bowline on Outdoor Stack Exchange tied with the end on the inside? because that is the classic bowline. End on the ...


4

I would say, dismiss the bowline on a bight since it needs a backup stopper knot to prevent loosening over time so it's not a "complete" knot like the other candidates. The bends on the yosemite bowline are generally less tight than the figure eight. This bowline is less likely to jam, wears the the rope involved in the knot less, so from a rope longevity, ...


4

I am not (yet) a slackliner, but I have been impressed with the methodology of testing and development of Adam Burtle of NWslackline.org. His site has a number of videos that demonstrate different anchoring and tensioning systems. He also does line tension measurements and break testing on different setups and materials. When you watch his videos make ...


4

What is your intended use for those joined ropes? If your life depends on it (you tagged your question with "safety"), I would not recommend using drastically different sized ropes in the first place and I would recommend something that has been well tested by the rock-climbing community. Most rock climbers either join their ropes with the double fisherman's ...


4

The knot reduced the runner rating in half, but since there are two strands , its back to the UIAA standard of 22KN ... The 22kN rating is for the loop strength of the sling, not the single-strand strength. Therefore any reduction in strength caused by a knot puts the strength below the 22kN standard. Stated strength for a girth hitch varies from ...


3

In short, yes. It's not the most secure of knots, it'll do in many situations but I wouldn't want to trust my life with it under any circumstances! You might want to try the Slipped Buntline as a more secure alternative.


3

My favorite way to tie a bowline is a little unorthodox, but it's easier, especially 1-handed. Make a slipknot in the standing part. Grab the standing part. Twist to make a loop. Reach through the loop and grab the standing part. Pull the standing part through the loop. Pass the working end through the slipknot. Capsize the slipknot. Now you have a ...


3

The figure of 8 knot can be used instead of the bowline. It has a somewhat higher breaking strength. It is also very easy to untie even after being loaded. You might want to consider the alpine butterfly, it can be used whenever you need a standing loop on a rope. It is also considered climbing safe.


3

The best answer to this might be - don't. A double fishermans is very strong and secure, but it has serious downsides. The main being that the knot can become impossible to undo if the rope gets wet and strongly loaded, but also the knot can get caught over an edge. At a course a few years ago (run by the MLTA) I was taught that a simple overhand can be ...


2

You need to use a figure-eight knot, because if it is weighted you can still untie it. There are lots of knots to use, but figure-eights are the most common for this reason. Figure-eight - animated example


2

When considering the knots, there are several characteristics you would like to take into account: is it useful, that is, it's better to know only a few reliable knots well, than a lot of fancy ones poorly; is it secure, do not use insecure knots, you will only hurt someone; is it easy to tie, for example can you make it fast in the dark (i.e. with feel ...


2

There are three knots that I find cover most of my needs: The trucker's hitch can be cinched very tight and it's easy to add or remove tension. It's useful for tying down loads (on boats or roof racks), applying variable tension (e.g., for tarps or hammocks), and winching. It can be undone with a quick pull. The bowline is perfect for anchoring the end of ...


2

A bowline is not recommended for tying a boat to a pole because it can work itself loose over time, or when bounced. Instead, the recommendations are an anchor bend or a double bowline - and as an anchor bend can become impossibly tight over time, a double bowline might suit you best: from Wikipedia In saying that, if you must use a bowline, having the ...


1

make a surgeon's loop in the end of the leader use a loop-to-loop connection to join the leader to the fly line use a surgeon's knot to join the leader to the tippet This isn't the strongest knot, but it is small, quick to tie and reliable. Look on the Grog's Knots (animatedknots.com) site to find lots of other knots. tippet is usually 3-4 feet, total ...


1

There is a knot app for iOS and Android called Knots 3D that has knot names and their synonyms listed for English, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Korean, Russian and Spanish. There are 87 knots in the app. More knots and languages are mentioned for future releases. The list of knots is here: English Deutsch Nederlands Français Italiano 한국어 Pусский ...


1

In Hebrew, the bowline knot is translated as a rescue knot, so I assume the reason it is used is the fact that the chances of it untying unintentionally is low. When having the knot end on the inside, the end of the knot needs to move despite the added friction from the object or person the end of the knot is against. When using the end on the outside, it ...



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