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5

There are lots of options for buying indoor slack line setups, or if you're confident in your engineering abilities, you can build one yourself, I would NOT recommend trying to anchor a slack line to anything in your house, unless you are willing to drill holes in the concrete foundation in your basement to make fixed anchors. DIY Indoor Slackline ...


5

This is a great, and well thought out question! I'll try best as I can to answer as somebody that both climbs, guides, and teaches, but I worry that a correct answer doesn't exist, and at best it'll be an informed answer based on what we currently know. I'll elaborate below.. Question: If the rope or accessory cord that you are using will hold a single ...


3

When aiding, you can use a slip knot to tie off a fixed piton close to the rock face (if the eye is broken). You can do the same thing for a chickenhead if its shaped in such a way that the rope must be tighten to stay on. In that case I'd rather use that for body weight, not fall protection.


2

If your basement columns are made out of reinforced concrete as I suppose, get a metal stud finder to be sure not to drill the steel and just go for it. Use a chemical bolt (see here: http://www.fischer.de/en/Home/Product-Range/Product-Selector.aspx/cpage-category/pcategory-1001076852/ for an example) by following its instructions and then happily go for ...


2

This is simply a Clove Hitch on the belay loop. It's quite effective to use in place of a belay plate because it doesn't require anyone to hold either side of the rope. The biner is placed where it is to make it easier to loosen the rope with one hand in-case it locks up. Once slightly loosened, you can simply pull the loop (coming from the tail side of the ...


1

He was demonstrating how to tie a Clove Hitch one-handed for setting up a belay when one arm is broken. The karabiner in the knot is to help release and untie it afterwards.


1

The three knots you listed are all quite suitable for tying in to a sit harness for rock climbing. The figure eight is the most widely used and most readily and easily inspected, and is not a bad choice for tying in: ...When tying into the rope there’s a reason the figure eight knot has been the knot of choice for years. Strong, simple, easy to untie ...



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