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13

I believe the conventional way is to use a double (triple) fisherman's bend. This has the advantage of being and relatively compact. The main disadvantage is that it can be hard to undo if you need to. Other options include the figure of 8 bend which is bulkier than the fisherman's but easier to untie. You could also use a (double) sheet bend or even a ...


8

It's what @imsodin said. Bloqueur is the french term for "blocker" in English. So when I talk about a bloqueur, I'm talking about blocking devices. The two that I use for ascending a rope are the Petzl basic and Petzl croll. The use of French terms is a habit that I picked up from canyoning, which is by origin a French sport, so most of the terms used there ...


8

I use the (double) Fisherman's knot for such cases. It's easy to tie and has a clear and concise form (easy to check if done right). As already mentioned in nivag's answer, it can be hard to untie if it was heavily loaded. One of its drawbacks is that it is not applicable for webbing as it is not possible to tighten it there to be stable. Here the waterman ...


7

Coming from a climbing and industrial rope access background, the double fisherman's is the recommended way to make a loop using rope/cord. Undoing the knot was never part of the question, however under body weight loading even this shouldn't be too difficult. The figure of eight would work equally as well, I'd use it more for joining ropes for long ...


6

First things first: Please be careful when rock climbing. Learning information on the internet is no substitute to proper training from an experienced and knowledgeable guide. Please don't use this information to put yourself in a situation where you may be in danger. That said You will need around one arms span of rope (about 1m). First ...


6

The clove hitch is probably what you're looking for. You can even tie it directly on the branch/beam/bar without worrying about adding a carabiner. You could also tie it to the carabiner, adjust the length, and clip the carabiner to something else. The clove hitch is one of the most under-utilized climbing knots out there. It's infinitely adjustable because ...


6

How about a Figure 8 Bend? Easy to untie even under heavy load. We use them all the time in rock climbing.


6

I alternate between the double fisherman's (which everyone has already talked about) and the flat overhand. Lately I've been leaning towards the flat overhand. The benefit of the flat overhand is that it's much easier to tie, inspect, and (most importantly) untie after it's been loaded. When properly tied and dressed, the flat overhand has been shown to be ...


6

I can only assume, that it derives from bloquer which is french for blocking. What the "c" is doing in there I have no clue - but then, I am not a native french speaker. In this case there are several devices that are generally used for this: There is Petzls Tibloc, a very light device. But it is also very aggressive and may damage the rope so it has to ...


5

I'll preface this by saying I've never tried this in a real world application myself, but I was curious and found some instructions for creating quick harnesses out of webbing from a web search. I want to add that I am in no way endorsing this for climbing or prolonged use beyond a static hang or an emergency situation. I've heard and read that ...


5

The way I've always done it is with a 'slippery half-hitch.' It's quick, I don't believe it can spill and it is always reasonable to untie once the load is removed. It took me a while to find an illustration, but this is a fine one. Edit: In response to your issue with removing the slipknot, I was playing with some paracord and I believe something like ...


4

This knot is what I'd call a stopper knot. You twist turn the end of the rope two times around itself, as shown, then thread the end through the now-created loops. It is used in rock climbing: If you attach the rope to your climbing harness with a re-threaded figure-of-eight knot, then with the short loose end you tie this knot around the long end. This ...


4

This wire knot comes under other names and I found it under a Cobb & Co hitch knot (another Australian name). It requires wire, what you intend to tie together, a bolt or screw driver, and pliers to cut the wire. Cut yourself a bit more than twice the length of wire to go around the job. Fold the wire in half. Pass the folded part (bight) of ...


4

When I am trad-climbing (actually generally when rock-climbing), I carry 60cm (shoulder length) and 120cm slings. Some 60cm slings set up as alpine draws, the rest over my shoulder. When setting up a belay station, 60cm slings tend to be too short. When using a double boolean as central point, that uses already most of the sling length. Further, when ...


4

You could probably tie a sheetbend using the carabiner as one of the "lines". It's easily adjustable and can be doubled for more holding strength. Back when I started climbing in the '70's we used to use a double carabiner brake to rappel (abseil) back down the face. We didn't have descending 8's or any other specialized gear for rappeling, and they still ...


4

Unless I'm missing something you could just throw the rope over the bar and tie the two ends together with figure eight bend/sheet bend/reef knot. If you're worried about it moving too much you could give it a couple of turns round the bar or even tie directly to the bar with two clove hitches (as Felix suggested) or round turns & two half hitches ...


3

The knot in the photo you posted is a double overhand knot. It's often used as half of a double fisherman's bend, and that's essentially how it's being used in the web page. (It will become a double fisherman's bend once the loop of cord is weighted and the two knots collide.) The web page advocates using this as a harness to tie in someone who doesn't have ...


3

My standard habit is a figure-8 on the bight. Why? You can't screw it up. (You can tie a slip knot backward and have it not work) This means it is easier to explain to someone how to tie. it is fairly easy to untie. Just bend it over and break it's back (A marlin spike or a fid may help). However, whatever knot you chose to use, you should not be overly ...


3

I'm going to be that guy and answer my own question, since it's languished for a while... Since there were no answers, I just went ahead and tried it. Verdict is that it works and seems to be very strong, but it is not easy to quickly switch leaders, since the braid-half of the loop-to-loop tightens around it itself much more than the mono/fluoro side of ...


2

There is a description of this in Freedom of the Hills, around p. 149 in the edition I have. They describe it as an emergency alternative to a manufactured harness. Peter Croft also suggests using them intentionally for lightweight climbing, if you don't think the climb requires a harness, but you will want to rappel at some point. The basic idea is to make ...


2

When considering the knots, there are several characteristics you would like to take into account: is it useful, that is, it's better to know only a few reliable knots well, than a lot of fancy ones poorly; is it secure, do not use insecure knots, you will only hurt someone; is it easy to tie, for example can you make it fast in the dark (i.e. with feel ...


2

None of the photos show the bowline with the loose end tied off. In this (untied off) form the knot is unsafe as there is a strong chance of slippage. It's also easy to tie badly with fatal consequences. On the plus side its possible to tie one single handed in about 4 seconds. When tied off with a single or better double hitch though then this knot is ...


2

Slippery versions of knots/hitches are very useful in many applications, but have limited use in climbing. But there is one application for which I often use a slippery overhand knot. When I'm cleaning a sport route and need to rappel, I'll tie a slip knot in the rope (before I untie myself from the rope) and clip it to my harness so that I cannot lose the ...


1

Aside from the slip hitch*, you can also use a girth hitch or clove hitch to sling a chicken head (or similar protrusion). The slip hitch will place only a single strand around the object, which may be helpful if space is limited or if you need the additional length. It's very easy to remember and tie, although with practice a clove hitch can also be ...


1

What do you mean by a directional figure 8? Is that a figure 8 on a bight? An overhand on a bight is quite secure if carefully dressed and pre-tensioned on every strand in opposition to every strand on the other side. People rappel off of an offset overhand, which is basically the same knot. It's quick to tie and easier to untie than a figure 8.


1

The knots I use the most while camping is the Taught-line hitch, Siberian hitch, Trucker's Hitch, Prusik Knot, Figure 8 loop, and the slip knot. In fact these are the only knots I ever use, besides tying my shoes. A great easy way to rig up a ridge line between two trees is to use the Siberian hitch and Trucker's hitch. The Siberian hitch allows for a quick ...



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