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13

I believe the conventional way is to use a double (triple) fisherman's bend. This has the advantage of being and relatively compact. The main disadvantage is that it can be hard to undo if you need to. Other options include the figure of 8 bend which is bulkier than the fisherman's but easier to untie. You could also use a (double) sheet bend or even a ...


8

It's what @imsodin said. Bloqueur is the french term for "blocker" in English. So when I talk about a bloqueur, I'm talking about blocking devices. The two that I use for ascending a rope are the Petzl basic and Petzl croll. The use of French terms is a habit that I picked up from canyoning, which is by origin a French sport, so most of the terms used there ...


8

I use the (double) Fisherman's knot for such cases. It's easy to tie and has a clear and concise form (easy to check if done right). As already mentioned in nivag's answer, it can be hard to untie if it was heavily loaded. One of its drawbacks is that it is not applicable for webbing as it is not possible to tighten it there to be stable. Here the waterman ...


8

For what purposes? For 'general' purpose, you should be able to get by just fine by making a bight in your line, then tying any knot you'd normally use in your situation using the bight as your line. This is known as tying a knot 'in the bight'. For example, the classic bowline could be used with the rope doubled up (aka; a double bowline), as can two half ...


7

Coming from a climbing and industrial rope access background, the double fisherman's is the recommended way to make a loop using rope/cord. Undoing the knot was never part of the question, however under body weight loading even this shouldn't be too difficult. The figure of eight would work equally as well, I'd use it more for joining ropes for long ...


7

They are examples of a round turn and two half hitches. Sometimes known as an anchor hitch or a fisherman's hitch. http://www.animatedknots.com/roundturn/index.php?Categ=boating A Useful Boating Knot: A Round Turn and Two (or more) Half Hitches (ABOK # 1720, p 296) is useful for attaching a mooring line to a dock post or ring although probably less ...


7

As Freedom of the Hills also states: "Mechanical ascenders are stronger, safer, faster, and less tiring." – Freedom of the Hills The key advantage in there being, "less tiring", yes you could save a couple hundred grams by not carrying ascenders and instead using some prusiks, but how much do those weight savings benefit you after you've ascended ...


7

Knots by Grog say: If you are asked to learn to tie the Sheepshank, please request your Troop Leader to eliminate this knot and replace it with something safe and useful, e.g., the Alpine Butterfly Loop is an excellent way of creating a loop in the middle of a length of rope and can also be safely used to shorten a rope. So it sounds like you ...


6

The clove hitch is probably what you're looking for. You can even tie it directly on the branch/beam/bar without worrying about adding a carabiner. You could also tie it to the carabiner, adjust the length, and clip the carabiner to something else. The clove hitch is one of the most under-utilized climbing knots out there. It's infinitely adjustable because ...


6

How about a Figure 8 Bend? Easy to untie even under heavy load. We use them all the time in rock climbing.


6

I alternate between the double fisherman's (which everyone has already talked about) and the flat overhand. Lately I've been leaning towards the flat overhand. The benefit of the flat overhand is that it's much easier to tie, inspect, and (most importantly) untie after it's been loaded. When properly tied and dressed, the flat overhand has been shown to be ...


6

I can only assume, that it derives from bloquer which is french for blocking. What the "c" is doing in there I have no clue - but then, I am not a native french speaker. In this case there are several devices that are generally used for this: There is Petzls Tibloc, a very light device. But it is also very aggressive and may damage the rope so it has to ...


6

This is simply a Clove Hitch on the belay loop. It could be quite effective to use instead of a belay plate if you can only use one hand because it doesn't require you to hold either side of the rope - it simply tightens and locks up in the event of a fall. The biner is placed where it is to make it easier to loosen the rope with one hand in-case it locks ...


6

Slippery versions of knots/hitches are very useful in many applications, but have limited use in climbing. But there is one application for which I often use a slippery overhand knot. In Sport climbing When I'm cleaning a sport route and need to rappel, I'll tie a slip knot in the rope (before I untie myself from the rope) and clip it to my harness so that ...


5

There are lots of options for buying indoor slack line setups, or if you're confident in your engineering abilities, you can build one yourself, I would NOT recommend trying to anchor a slack line to anything in your house, unless you are willing to drill holes in the concrete foundation in your basement to make fixed anchors. DIY Indoor Slackline ...


5

This is a great, and well thought out question! I'll try best as I can to answer as somebody that both climbs, guides, and teaches, but I worry that a correct answer doesn't exist, and at best it'll be an informed answer based on what we currently know. I'll elaborate below.. Question: If the rope or accessory cord that you are using will hold a single ...


5

I'll preface this by saying I've never tried this in a real world application myself, but I was curious and found some instructions for creating quick harnesses out of webbing from a web search. I want to add that I am in no way endorsing this for climbing or prolonged use beyond a static hang or an emergency situation. I've heard and read that ...


5

Slip knot It's undoubtably a slip knot that's been tied off with a half hitch. some of the knots look different because some are tied off right-handed while others are left-handed. Compare the image below to the second image in the question: I think I even know why that knot was used in that display case too. Whoever made that display and tied the knot ...


5

A water knot is the best knot for joining two ends of webbing, I wouldn't recommend any other knot except for maybe the beer knot, but that's certainly not going to save you any time. You don't need to tie back up knots either, webbing doesn't slip like rope does, in fact I've never known webbing to slip at all, and I've set up a lot of slacklines using 1" ...


4

You could probably tie a sheetbend using the carabiner as one of the "lines". It's easily adjustable and can be doubled for more holding strength. Back when I started climbing in the '70's we used to use a double carabiner brake to rappel (abseil) back down the face. We didn't have descending 8's or any other specialized gear for rappeling, and they still ...


4

Unless I'm missing something you could just throw the rope over the bar and tie the two ends together with figure eight bend/sheet bend/reef knot. If you're worried about it moving too much you could give it a couple of turns round the bar or even tie directly to the bar with two clove hitches (as Felix suggested) or round turns & two half hitches ...


4

Aside from the slip hitch*, you can also use a girth hitch or clove hitch to sling a chicken head (or similar protrusion). The slip hitch will place only a single strand around the object, which may be helpful if space is limited or if you need the additional length. It's very easy to remember and tie, although with practice a clove hitch can also be ...


4

This knot is what I'd call a stopper knot. You twist turn the end of the rope two times around itself, as shown, then thread the end through the now-created loops. It is used in rock climbing: If you attach the rope to your climbing harness with a re-threaded figure-of-eight knot, then with the short loose end you tie this knot around the long end. This ...


4

This wire knot comes under other names and I found it under a Cobb & Co hitch knot (another Australian name). It requires wire, what you intend to tie together, a bolt or screw driver, and pliers to cut the wire. Cut yourself a bit more than twice the length of wire to go around the job. Fold the wire in half. Pass the folded part (bight) of ...


4

When I am trad-climbing (actually generally when rock-climbing), I carry 60cm (shoulder length) and 120cm slings. Some 60cm slings set up as alpine draws, the rest over my shoulder. When setting up a belay station, 60cm slings tend to be too short. When using a double boolean as central point, that uses already most of the sling length. Further, when ...


3

When aiding, you can use a slip knot to tie off a fixed piton close to the rock face (if the eye is broken). You can do the same thing for a chickenhead if its shaped in such a way that the rope must be tighten to stay on. In that case I'd rather use that for body weight, not fall protection.


3

The knot in the photo you posted is a double overhand knot. It's often used as half of a double fisherman's bend, and that's essentially how it's being used in the web page. (It will become a double fisherman's bend once the loop of cord is weighted and the two knots collide.) The web page advocates using this as a harness to tie in someone who doesn't have ...


3

I tie two half hitches, with the second one being slipped. I don't have any trouble with tension, and it's easy to remove later.


3

Coming from a climbing background, I would propose the following: Tie the cord/rope into a loop, for example using the One-sided overhand bend or the double fisherman's knot Secure it around the pole using a Prusik knot. Note that the english wikipedia entry is only about climbing; the german version also mentions that this friction knot can be used e.g. ...


2

He was demonstrating how to tie a Clove Hitch one-handed for setting up a belay when one arm is broken. The karabiner in the knot is to help release and untie it afterwards.



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