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8

For what purposes? For 'general' purpose, you should be able to get by just fine by making a bight in your line, then tying any knot you'd normally use in your situation using the bight as your line. This is known as tying a knot 'in the bight'. For example, the classic bowline could be used with the rope doubled up (aka; a double bowline), as can two half ...


7

As Freedom of the Hills also states: "Mechanical ascenders are stronger, safer, faster, and less tiring." – Freedom of the Hills The key advantage in there being, "less tiring", yes you could save a couple hundred grams by not carrying ascenders and instead using some prusiks, but how much do those weight savings benefit you after you've ascended ...


7

Knots by Grog say: If you are asked to learn to tie the Sheepshank, please request your Troop Leader to eliminate this knot and replace it with something safe and useful, e.g., the Alpine Butterfly Loop is an excellent way of creating a loop in the middle of a length of rope and can also be safely used to shorten a rope. So it sounds like you ...


7

They are examples of a round turn and two half hitches. Sometimes known as an anchor hitch or a fisherman's hitch. http://www.animatedknots.com/roundturn/index.php?Categ=boating A Useful Boating Knot: A Round Turn and Two (or more) Half Hitches (ABOK # 1720, p 296) is useful for attaching a mooring line to a dock post or ring although probably less ...


6

This is simply a Clove Hitch on the belay loop. It could be quite effective to use instead of a belay plate if you can only use one hand because it doesn't require you to hold either side of the rope - it simply tightens and locks up in the event of a fall. The biner is placed where it is to make it easier to loosen the rope with one hand in-case it locks ...


5

The European Death Knot is commonly used for joining two ropes for an abseil. I would not say it is "not considered safe" - e.g. the British Mountaineering Council's website lists it as a possible abseil knot. Although not the strongest knot it has the advantage that it is small and less likely to snag on edges than larger knots or stronger symmetrical ...


5

A water knot is the best knot for joining two ends of webbing, I wouldn't recommend any other knot except for maybe the beer knot, but that's certainly not going to save you any time. You don't need to tie back up knots either, webbing doesn't slip like rope does, in fact I've never known webbing to slip at all, and I've set up a lot of slacklines using 1" ...


5

Slip knot It's undoubtably a slip knot that's been tied off with a half hitch. some of the knots look different because some are tied off right-handed while others are left-handed. Compare the image below to the second image in the question: I think I even know why that knot was used in that display case too. Whoever made that display and tied the knot ...


5

There are lots of options for buying indoor slack line setups, or if you're confident in your engineering abilities, you can build one yourself, I would NOT recommend trying to anchor a slack line to anything in your house, unless you are willing to drill holes in the concrete foundation in your basement to make fixed anchors. DIY Indoor Slackline ...


5

This is a great, and well thought out question! I'll try best as I can to answer as somebody that both climbs, guides, and teaches, but I worry that a correct answer doesn't exist, and at best it'll be an informed answer based on what we currently know. I'll elaborate below.. Question: If the rope or accessory cord that you are using will hold a single ...


4

This knot is what I'd call a stopper knot. You twist turn the end of the rope two times around itself, as shown, then thread the end through the now-created loops. It is used in rock climbing: If you attach the rope to your climbing harness with a re-threaded figure-of-eight knot, then with the short loose end you tie this knot around the long end. This ...


4

This wire knot comes under other names and I found it under a Cobb & Co hitch knot (another Australian name). It requires wire, what you intend to tie together, a bolt or screw driver, and pliers to cut the wire. Cut yourself a bit more than twice the length of wire to go around the job. Fold the wire in half. Pass the folded part (bight) of ...


4

I love these situations "It tried it once, and it worked, must be safe"...... I am so glad aviation and car industry don't work that way. The answer has to be No, its not safe with ropes of different dimensions. Its also not safe with ropes of the same dimension. Which is less safe - I don't know and I don't care and neither should you. There is one place ...


4

Coming from a climbing background, I would propose the following: Tie the cord/rope into a loop, for example using the One-sided overhand bend or the double fisherman's knot Secure it around the pole using a Prusik knot. Note that the english wikipedia entry is only about climbing; the german version also mentions that this friction knot can be used e.g. ...


4

According to this source its name arose initially in the US where unfamiliarity bred distrust, and because the occasional disaster, likely with the Flat Figure 8 version, caused both knots to be branded with the EDK (European Death Knot) name. Another source says its name is because this knot looked sketchy for americans when they european climbers using ...


3

I tie two half hitches, with the second one being slipped. I don't have any trouble with tension, and it's easy to remove later.


3

I would recommend using a double figure eight I always use this knot when tying off the end of the rope, it's stronger, safer, and it's easier to untie. If that doesn't work for you, then try a double-nine (double figure nine on a bight), it looks messy, but it comes loose real easy.


3

When aiding, you can use a slip knot to tie off a fixed piton close to the rock face (if the eye is broken). You can do the same thing for a chickenhead if its shaped in such a way that the rope must be tighten to stay on. In that case I'd rather use that for body weight, not fall protection.


3

If the top biner gets loaded weirdly against a hanger, a fixed connection to the sling (girth hitch) makes it more likely that the biner will break. This is why non-alpine draws have the top biner free and the bottom one fixed. Petzl Manual


3

The knot in the photo you posted is a double overhand knot. It's often used as half of a double fisherman's bend, and that's essentially how it's being used in the web page. (It will become a double fisherman's bend once the loop of cord is weighted and the two knots collide.) The web page advocates using this as a harness to tie in someone who doesn't have ...


2

He was demonstrating how to tie a Clove Hitch one-handed for setting up a belay when one arm is broken. The karabiner in the knot is to help release and untie it afterwards.


2

If your basement columns are made out of reinforced concrete as I suppose, get a metal stud finder to be sure not to drill the steel and just go for it. Use a chemical bolt (see here: http://www.fischer.de/en/Home/Product-Range/Product-Selector.aspx/cpage-category/pcategory-1001076852/ for an example) by following its instructions and then happily go for ...


2

I think you did just fine. Key factors: You want the leather to be non flat, so the stone sits in in one place. This will get you far more consistent throws. You have in essence created the pocket by making the rim with the line. I think the common way is just to tie the line to the pocket material. You can make a better pocket by getting the leather ...


2

In ShemSegers answer fixed lines for ascending are properly adressed, there is nothing to add for me. As an alpine based mountaineer I come across lots of fixed lines whose primary purpose is security against fallig and also aiding the ascent. So the line is not the primary means for ascending. In this case, the described benefits of an ascender do not apply ...


1

I'm partial to the taut-line hitch, but you could also use a rolling hitch. I like using adjustable knots because they're easier to get tight, quick to re-tighten if they come loose for any reason, and easy to loose and untie. Simply tie the taut-line hitch back onto the same line after feeding it through the loop, you can then slide the knot along the rope ...


1

The three knots you listed are all quite suitable for tying in to a sit harness for rock climbing. The figure eight is the most widely used and most readily and easily inspected, and is not a bad choice for tying in: ...When tying into the rope there’s a reason the figure eight knot has been the knot of choice for years. Strong, simple, easy to untie ...


1

The knots I use the most while camping is the Taught-line hitch, Siberian hitch, Trucker's Hitch, Prusik Knot, Figure 8 loop, and the slip knot. In fact these are the only knots I ever use, besides tying my shoes. A great easy way to rig up a ridge line between two trees is to use the Siberian hitch and Trucker's hitch. The Siberian hitch allows for a quick ...


1

The Bell Ringer with the added a Half Hitch on the ear is a good one. However, if a Span Loop seized up on you, then you must be tying something else accidentally. A Span Loop should not come even remotely close to seizing up in any kind of rope. I have used the Span Loop in all kinds of rope in all kinds of conditions. The Span Loop never came remotely ...


1

I have the same question and that is how i ended up finding this discussion. After pondering all the solutions, i believe that a slippery half hitch via twisted loops is the best answer. I got inspiration from this youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvgFyqFZK54. The twists keep the slip knot from rolling down the rope. Maybe that is the problem ...


1

Yes, this will reduce the strength of your sling. Look at the rating on your carabiner, though. It's probably something like: 23kn, 7kn, 7kn. What will reduce the strength of your system most? Loading your biner sideways! This technique is a great way to mitigate that risk. Much more worth the reduction in strength of the sling, even if it is as much as ...



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