Hot answers tagged

11

To answer your question as to the ideal break position when using the munter: It depends. It depends on your comfort and experience with the knot, its application and the situation. I have rappeled and belayed with munter-hitches on numeral occasions. A double stranded munter-hitch rappel provides a significant amount of friction and unless you want to ...


10

As already stated, these are very similar knots regarding there use. So there is not much that differentiates them from each other, but to other friction hitches. The advantage of the prusik is the "clean" design: All strands are neatly position parallel to themselves, so it is easily inspected for correctness. For the Klemheist this is not the main ...


9

A climber and aborist should be superbly proficient in a knot or technique before relying on it. An Arborist will spend 100's of hours a year climbing - much more than average climbers, and has more time to become proficient in complex techniques, and uses them enough the advantages are worth the effort. Most climbers on the other hand will climb a few ...


9

The main reasons is simplicity and habituation: A prusik made from a loop is easily taught and controlled. This is a point that many experienced climber forget about often: When people start they may struggle on the basic knots. So for the first thing to learn a simplicity is more important than functionality. And the prusik is a long established and ...


9

A Munter hitch can brake regardless of the orientation of the brake strand. It provides the greatest braking force in the "closed" position (the brake strand running alongside the load strand), and a lesser force in the open position. The first site I found with testing found the following brake force values (tested with 11mm rope): Easy one-handed ...


8

Girth Hitch I think the knot you're using is appropriate if the idea is not to lose your kit, another knot may run you the risk of losing something because it came untied without your blessing. If you're using cheap cord, then don't bother with the knot if it's giving you grief, just cut it at the knot, your cord will get shorter each time, but it still ...


6

For certain purposes, the offset overhand bend is not just safe but safer than any known alternative. The alternative name "European death knot" is a joke referring to the fact that to the uninitiated, the knot looks like it wouldn't be secure. It's like the phrase "politically incorrect," which nobody today uses without irony. There is a common ...


6

The European Death Knot is commonly used for joining two ropes for an abseil. I would not say it is "not considered safe" - e.g. the British Mountaineering Council's website lists it as a possible abseil knot. Although not the strongest knot it has the advantage that it is small and less likely to snag on edges than larger knots or stronger symmetrical ...


5

I'm not sure how your setup is, but I'd try a Purcell prussik or something similar. Animated example You must test its holding Power on paracord yourself, but on climbing cord it's solid enough.


5

I would go with either a barrel hitch or a barrel sling depending on the exact purpose. With the added constraint that the rope can only go around the object once the the "magic" needs to be in the knot/hitch, I think a trucker's hitch is probably best (but not very good). It will let you get a tight fit. The holding power will depend on the stiffness and ...


5

I believe the better way is a list of easy to tie, easy to inspect, reliable must know knots. My advise to beginners is master just one way to tie each knot, and only a few knots (3 or 4 is all you need to climb safely). Ignore alternate ways to tie the same knot and ignore people who tell you there is a better knot for that job till you have mastered ...


5

According to this source its name arose initially in the US where unfamiliarity bred distrust, and because the occasional disaster, likely with the Flat Figure 8 version, caused both knots to be branded with the EDK (European Death Knot) name. Another source says its name is because this knot looked sketchy for americans when they european climbers using it....


4

I love these situations "It tried it once, and it worked, must be safe"...... I am so glad aviation and car industry don't work that way. The answer has to be No, its not safe with ropes of different dimensions. Its also not safe with ropes of the same dimension. Which is less safe - I don't know and I don't care and neither should you. There is one place ...


4

Something that occurred to me after asking is that a Prusik is bidirectional, whereas generally the arborist's knots are unidirectional. I believe the unidirectional knots are easier to both slide up and release, making them superior in a dedicated climbing rig, but their application is limited as well. Following both existing answers emphasizing ...


4

His opinion was that I could tie an overhand for the master point and be just as safeā€“the only downside being that it would be more difficult to untie after being loaded. Yes, this is correct. Many people seem to think that commonly used climbing knots can slip if there's not enough friction to make them hold, and that we should choose a knot based on ...


4

should I be untying the fisherman's knot between uses? Typically it's simply not possible to untie a fisherman's knot, especially after it's been loaded, so that wouldn't even be an option. This is actually a good reason to tie your Prusik cords with an offset overhand (EDK), because then if you ever need to untie the loop and use it for something else, ...


3

My brother happened to be over tonight using my climbing wall, he does rescue work, and he says they use this knot to tie leg loops for rescue harnesses. First of all, the knot in your picture isn't properly dressed, the loop pulls through the knot and ends up looking like this: It's a variation of a bowline on a bight. My brother's going to check his ...


3

The knot shown on Climbing.com is indeed a barrel knot, and yes the barrel knot they're showing you to tie is essentially a triple overhand, but the difference is a barrel knot isn't defined by the number of overhand loops you put in it. A barrel knot can have three, four, five, or more loops tied into it, a double overhand in the end of a rope can also be ...


3

The bowline knot form a fixed loop at the end of a rope. It has the virtues of being both easy to tie and untie; most notably, it is easy to untie after being subjected to a load. See How do I tie a bowline knot?


3

I realize this is not the answer you are looking for, but it deserves to be mentioned. As @amphibient mentions in a comment. People with long term medical issues that make tying shoes difficult, generally use shoes with Velcro straps or shoes that slip on without laces or ties. Alternatively, for short term issue, you can use the shoes you have now, ...


3

I think you invented a new knot, or at least one that is decently documented (my non-trivial search came up empty). Regardless, the bigger question (as others pointed out in the comments) is how it handles in various tests, and whether it fares better, worse, or on par with the flat overhand bend. Even if it was previously named, it may not have been tested ...


3

I would recommend using a double figure eight I always use this knot when tying off the end of the rope, it's stronger, safer, and it's easier to untie. If that doesn't work for you, then try a double-nine (double figure nine on a bight), it looks messy, but it comes loose real easy.


3

Yes, this will reduce the strength of your sling. Look at the rating on your carabiner, though. It's probably something like: 23kn, 7kn, 7kn. What will reduce the strength of your system most? Loading your biner sideways! This technique is a great way to mitigate that risk. Much more worth the reduction in strength of the sling, even if it is as much as ...


3

This answer does not provide much new information to Ben Crowell's and Charlie Brumbaugh's, but I am not entirely in agreement with all their different conclusions. TLDR: In your use case and most use cases strength reduction by a knot is not an issue, so use whatever save knot you are comfortable with. In general consider the rule of 50% strength reduction ...


2

I have been climbing on a yosemite bowline for a long time, and never had any problems. I don't see it as any harder to check than a figure 8 once you are used to it. It's easy to tie, secure, faster than the figure 8, requires less rope, and never gets difficult to untie after falls. It's a great knot, and there seems to be a lot of superstitious aversion ...


2

They are essentially the same knot on the rope, they're both friction hitches. The difference is how they connect to your harness. Distel hitches are used mostly by arborists, one advantage a distel hitch has over a prussik is how well it works in combination with a pulley system: You are right that they both ultimately do the same job, so do the ...


2

A Knot is a knot and its usually not something to get tied up in knots about. An simple overhand is a better knot in tape, purely because a Fig8 is impossible to lie neatly. As far as the question goes, Fig 8 is good. With any knot if its the only one you know, its far safer than any other knot you could use. Fig 8 might be a bit hard to undo at the end of ...


2

You may be referring to a bunny ears figure eight - it's an versatile knot used to construct rock climbing anchors. http://www.backcountry.com/explore/bunny-ears-the-best-multi-pitch-climbing-knot-youve-never-heard-of It has the benefit of having redundancy in the main loop (two loops in bunny ears compared to one in a typical figure eight). It's also ...


2

The type of knot you are looking for a called a friction hitch, or a slide and grip knot which is a kind of knot used to attach one rope to another in a way that is easily adjusted. There are many different ways to tie a friction hitch: Klemheist Blake's Hitch Distel Hitch Rolling Hitch Prussic Bachmann Hitch Autoblock Hitch And of course the Purcell ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible