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17

Short Answer: In the US, laws regulating land use are detailed and varied, even on Public Lands. Check with the local land agency before "roaming." Long Answer: Loosely you can divide open space in the US into two main categories: Private and Public. Private Land: The laws governing private land vary by state. In Texas, for example, a landowner is well ...


13

All land in the UK is owned by somebody, therefore, all trees and their produce (including firewood) are owned by somebody. You could be charged with theft if you take logs, kindling etc. without permission. The Jeremy Vine Show on BBC Radio 2 on 6th January 2012 discussed this very topic following the storms in the UK around that time, that left a lot of ...


12

National parks tend to be absolutely open to anyone, their goal being to allow public enjoyment without compromising the area for future generations. From the park's own website: A permit is not required for front-country camping, hiking, moorage, etc. in most parks. Campsite reservations are accepted at many front-country parks. To be absolutely ...


12

Laws vary greatly by region, and are subject to being changed at any time. That being said, there are a few sites I used when looking up the knife laws in California. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knife_legislation Provides a good overview of knife laws, but did not provide the specifics I need. It's worth browsing the sources that they reference however. ...


11

In both the U.S. and Canada, amateur radio operators serve an important role in providing emergency radio communications during war, disaster, terrorist attack, or whatever other emergency. So amateur radio operators take an extremely dim view of unlicensed operators using frequencies allocated to amateur (or sometimes commercial) radio. Many will even hunt ...


10

Be very careful as far as schools are concerned - parents or staff will tend to be rather vigilant with strangers on site (especially primary schools) and I believe without permission it is technically trespassing. Geocaches really shouldn't be placed in such areas without written permission anyway, so for some that have done this you might be ok (though ...


8

You have absolute responsibility for your dog, what it does is always your fault in the eyes of the law. If your dog kills an animal, you are also responsible for reporting it to the department that handles the preservation of wild animals(Naturvårdsverket here in Sweden). A fine might be imposed or if the case is severe, the dog might even be put down in ...


8

The Scottish 'code' mentions specific rights on the 'foreshore' What about public rights on the foreshore? 2.18 Public rights on the foreshore and in tidal waters will continue to exist. These have not been fully defined but include shooting wildfowl, fishing for sea fish, gathering some uncultivated shellfish, lighting fires, swimming, playing ...


7

According to this article on Walk Highlands, from December 2011: Hillwalkers and climbers will be able to legally carry Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs) from 12 January following a change in UK regulations. Previously the devices, which send out a distress signal identifying the user’s exact location when activated, could only be licensed for use ...


7

Yes it is, but only for one night in any single spot. Staying multiple nights is considered camping and is not allowed. It is never allowed in national parks. I could only find Dutch references for this, but they all say the same and refer to relevant text in the Austrian lawbooks.


7

I am not a lawyer, or an expert on California knife laws. This post is based on my understanding of state laws both as written, and as summarized by other sites. This is the summary website that I used to determine what to carry here in southern California. http://www.ninehundred.net/~equalccw/knifelaw.html#SECTION TWO It tries to decrypt the legal speak ...


7

I don't want, however, to inform anyone around about that cache - I want to keep it secret only for 'chosen'. Although you don't want to, I'd strongly suggest rethinking this - does it really matter if a few neighbours know, and it stops an embarrassing incident or two when the police are called out? When I placed a cache in a (public) residential area ...


6

In areas with quotas on permits, often only a certain percentage of permits can be reserved. The remainder are available on a first-come first-serve basis at the ranger station. For Mt Whitney, there is definitely a quota. There's likely to be a lot of competition to get a permit for such a popular trail at such a popular time of year. I would recommend ...


6

As I understand it the permits have a couple of goals: It's a revenue stream to pay for the maintenance of the areas It's a way of controlling numbers It's a way of enforcing that the person with the permit has an understanding of the activity they are undertaking and has agreed to some kind of terms and conditions for said activity, it also means that if ...


6

What you want to do seems to be referred to by the Forest Service as "dispersed camping," and you can find a lot of information by googling on that phrase. Different jurisdictions seem to have different rules, but this blog post has a nice attempt to summarize how the rules usually work in national forests and on BLM land. Basically what they seem to want ...


6

As far as I know (living in Latvia, used to be a part of USSR), it is not completely legal. The owners can call the police, but it usually doesn't go that far. If you try to camp in a field or near a private lake, try to talk to somebody, if a home is in sight. If not, people in these parts are quite forthcoming and I've yet to get more than a grumpy "Just ...


5

Fires are permitted, as is free camping provided it does not interfere with agriculture or nature. Scottish Outdoor Access Code England and Wales have a slightly different code


5

It is allowed if there's no sign declaring it as Naturschutzgebiet/Naturschutzzone this is german for natural reserve if there's no such sign or you know for sure your not in such a reserve, it's safe to swim legally. However, best practice is to ask at the local tourist information center.


5

At the federal level your best bet is either Parks Canada or the Canadian Forest Service, which is part of Natural Resources Canada, which also has tons of other relevant areas such as maps and map data. At the provincial level there is a whole gamut of environment, forestry and fishery departments.


4

Generally, places where it is forbidden there is good signage, or it is a place where it is not surprising to be forbidden. Generally, it seemed that random stretches of highway would be posted, but just a mile or two down the road would be a spectacular place to pull over and hang out. Additionally, many parks have areas in which camping is prohibited or ...


3

There are really no general principles. Some permits are free and self-issued: you pick up a form at the trailhead and fill it out. This is really more of a registration system, so that the authorities know who is out there, but it's still required. Example. Some permits are automatically issued to anyone who pays a fee, so it's really a way of ...


3

This is a copy paste from wikipedia: The right to roam in Austria, particularly in forests and mountainous areas, is called Wegefreiheit. Since 1975 the right to roam in forests is guaranteed by Federal law. In particular, walking, running, hiking, and resting are automatically allowed to the public in most forest areas. However, horse riding, ...


3

Excluding the legality question, as to be honest, that's likely to depend on who detects you, and how much it interferes with licensed traffic, the safety angle has a couple of aspects: It doesn't look like you will clash with emergency services, however there is a risk that you will clash with local amateur radio operators who may be handling emergency ...


3

Just saw it on the news that they were handing out $100 fines for walking the trials at Valley Forge National Park. Runner Fined


3

Unless it is in a national park/forest or private property you should be able to go where you want. I have never been bothered as long as I was in a public area. They require wilderness permits in national parks to protect the wilderness and know if someone might be in trouble. If you don't show up on time they can send S&R in after you. If you are ...


2

Ok, first thing to note is who owns the coast. The land between the high water mark and the low water mark is owned by the crown (crown reserves) in UK law. (ref) The land above he high water mark is owned by land owners, this may also be the crown if it's common land etc. Any land owned by private land owners is subject to the land owners themselves. They ...


2

It is/was a popular pastime for environmentalists to chain themselves to the rails, and worse, to throw hooks onto the catenary. Trains catch these hooks and rip the catenary down. For this reason, the Train Police (Bahnpolizei) is sometimes on the lookout, and if they can't find real terrorists, harass normal people. I'd avoid railway lines when atomic ...


2

One option is to ask the land owners. In an attempt to answer your question... According to the Outdoor Magazin: Anyone under a tarp - a waterproof tarp stretched - stayed overnight, camping out and is in a legal gray zone. The night under the tarp also reduces the risk of being discovered and provides maximum enjoyment of nature, as it falls asleep and ...


2

I like the question although I am not a geocacher at all. If I want to allow strangers to enter my garden I have to give some kind of permission I guess. I understand that you don't want to make a sign "open access for geocacher". That could confuse others and for the geocachers it's a simple objective. So you have to hide the way you allow entering your ...


1

If the police catches you walking on the rail, the fine will be small. But there are some other risks: A high voltage power line above you. Walking on a rail is a popular method for suicide. If someone sees you they may call an ambulance, the police and stop all trains on that track. If the railway company has to compensate hundreds of passengers for being ...



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