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6

Your chances of getting hit by lightning while on the water are actually higher then if you are on the beach. (unless you are fishing) Fishing contributed to almost half - 46% - of the water-related deaths involving lightning strikes; while boating (power boats, canoes, sailboats, tubes) added another 25%. About 20% of the victims were relaxing on a ...


6

Close enough to shock i.e. an indirect strike According to the National Lightning Safety Institute lightning has been observed to arc out 40 meters and how far it conducts varies. Possible outcomes Death Concussive injury Burns Lichtenberg figures Blunt force trauma Cardiac Arrhythmias Kidney damage Cataracts Eardrum damage Lower extremity paralysis ...


4

It seems you are asking about risks of lightning striking close by, but not directly on you. In other words, the lightning current isn't passing thru you on its way between the ground and the sky. There are certainly risks. I think the two main ones are flying debris and ground currents. The current in lightning is very high, can heat things above the ...


3

I don't know how to compute the odds, but being out on a lake in a lightning storm is a really bad idea. The mountains around the lake aren't going to provide cover. There are several models about how nearby tall object protect you from getting directly hit by lightning. None of these are accurate or guarantees, as there is still much chance associated ...


2

Being struck directly is very unlikely though. Canoes are often made from wood, aluminum or fiberglass, although some plastic is used as well. Lightning strikes insulating materials all the time, like wooden trees or wooden houses. This is why lightning rods are found on wood buildings, to stop any lightning bolt from setting the building on fire. ...



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