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10

I was recently in Mexico and bought some unleaded gas at a gas station as stove fuel. I gave the unused fuel away to a taxi driver to put in his car. I suspect the same thing would work fine with the fuels sold as "white gas" or "camp fuel." I've heard conflicting information about exactly how this stuff is formulated, and for all I know it depends on the ...


10

While writing the question, I've figured out an answer. I just burn the fuel in the stove. Maybe this little knowledge would be helpful.


8

Here are a few methods If you have a lawnmower or weed eater you can dilute your gas by about 5% to 10% with it and burn it off that way, even if the fuel is 'bad'. Additionally, many fire departments will accept all manner of fuel, good or bad, and use it for backburning areas preparing for the summer fire season. Some auto parts stores will accept fuel ...


7

Not all fuels mix well. However, in the case of white gas and unleaded gasoline, one is basically a (much) cleaner version of the other, so you're not mixing so much as diluting the white gas with its inferior (for cooking) sibling. Still, you would get better performance out of the remaining white gas if you don't mix it with the unleaded. There's really ...


7

The issue with the bottles isn't so much the "bottle" as it is the pump. On an MSR bottle, a pump screws into the top, then a specific MSR-style hose (from a stove) attaches to the pump. On a Trangia, the attachment system is different (as per This Gas Burner, or This One, depending on fuel, I think). The question in your case would be whether the threading ...


6

I believe the threads are generally compatible, BUT that's not the issue. Trangia bottles are not metal (they're a plastic like material, perhaps floridated HDPE). Trangia bottles are NOT built to handle pressure and could be very dangerous if used with a pressurized white gas stove (such as a Whisperlite, Nova, Omnifuel, Dragonfly, etc). On the other hand ...


6

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


4

In my experience, the biggest culprits for leaking fuel are bad o-rings, but replacement o-rings of the wrong size and loose caps have also played a part. Over-tightened caps can also be a problem especially if the o-rings are a bit off size. Another consideration is the amount of fuel spilled on the stove or canister during fueling and use. Especially if ...


3

What's the problem? The guy at the airport will take it from you. Proper legal disposal is now his business. There might be a kiosk for dropping items you forgot to leave at home, before dealing with people.


3

I have successfully used mixtures of gasoline, diesel and kerosine in various portions and had no problems that couldn't be solved by swapping to the other jet. Use the suck it and see approach works fine without getting technical. If availability is an issue and it comes to hot dinner or raw dinner are you really going to be that picky which fuel you use, ...


3

If you are not specifically looking for a liquid fuel thing: I always fantasized about making one such thing. But I have never tried. Get a tin Make something that looks like below. Advantages: Tins are easy to find and so are those solid fuel tablets If you break it, worst case you will be at loss of money worth a burger and time worth an afternoon ...


3

Most things I can think of would stop it working even when full. My one suggestion is, is the pump below the fuel line when on its side? The fuel line is the white tube in the picture. If it is in the middle of the bottle and the fuel is low it might not be submerged when the bottle is horizontal. Have you tried putting the bottle vertically or rotating ...


2

Although the threads may be similar (and even look the same) I've found that often the gaskets are not the same between bottles: flat gaskets, round, beveled and there is a corresponding difference in the rims of bottles: flat, round, beveled. Threads also tend to start in different places, and can have more or less bite/edge to them that can shred or deform ...


2

This question honestly could be too localized on these specific products. However, considering the ubiquity of these stoves I find it is probably quite useful information to know if they could have interchangeable parts. MSR's Whisperlite International & Universal stoves are very similar products, but they have some fairly notable differences. Let's ...


2

Rather than the type of fuel - any stove designed to run a fuel will run it with little maintenance, but the quality is important. I had to strip and clean my cooker, that had never had a problem, daily - at 6000+meters due a batch of bad fuel. Best option for trouble free cookers is Gas (Butane/Propane) - the cannisters are sealed in the factory the fuel ...


2

One other issue is altitude changes. Even with 'new' gas bottles going from 0 to 10000 feet (or back down) may cause problems. One way I've dealt with this is to put the gas bottle in a zip lock bag (the larger bag sizes sometimes have two "zippers"). Eric


2

The original Penny Stove has been popular for over a decade as a DIY alcohol stove designed for ultralight backpackers. Its trademark is the use of a penny as a fuel regulator. Independent tests document that it heats faster, uses less fuel, simmers longer, and packs lighter than any commercial alcohol stove. The 2.0 version achieves the same ...


1

In general 'lighter' fuels with less additives will mean that the stove needs less cleaning. Most of the reason I've needed to clean a stove is from additives which don't burn properly (particularly when igniting the stove) can can block the nozzle and things. For this reason compressed gas is probably best, followed by white gas, petrol (gasoline) and ...


1

My personal preference is for gasoline (yes, even ethanol added). I've never had to clean any of my stoves since I started using it. Given that the quality is pretty closely monitored and regulated in the US this is an extremely consistent, clean burning, and cheap option. It's also extremely easy to find... It should be noted that the "white gas" available ...


1

There are no reliability problems specifically with dual fuel stoves. Reliability really has more to do with the design and the manufacturer than the fuel(s). So the best stove for you really depends on what you are doing. If you are making lots of short hikes with occasional multi-night treks, then a reliable dual fuel stove could be a great solution. If ...



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