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9

According to Will Gadd, you should sharpen your crampons and ice tools after every use. If you spend just a minute or two after each trip–sometimes you won't even need a minute, just give them a look over and a couple passes with the file to take off a couple burrs–then you're never going to have to worry about dull points. Regular maintenance also ensures ...


9

I usually sharp my crampons when I am expecting icy conditions, that means glare ice. Especially when you go steep and need front point technique, you need to rely on those points - all your bodys weight. If your front spikes are too coarse, you need much more energy to bring them secure and stable into the ice. Besides that, the ice will splinter and break ...


7

Ordinary vegetable oils of the type used for cooking will work but are not ideal. Over time they will gradually oxidise and may be colonised by bacteria, both of which can cause them to become acidic which can itself cause corrosion of the metal. Also vegetable oils can become gummy and sticky in quite a short period of time. Oils help to prevent ...


1

For marine covers there are some cleaning products made on purpose that you could use on the awning too. The DIY route consists in solutions of bleach+water or ammonia+water that tend to be nasty to deal with and dispose of (cant just let them on the ground), they do work. Peroxide is another solution, safer but a bit less effective. Beware that they can ...


1

From the sales material you quote it sounds like the 'wood' in question has been vacuum stabilised. This involves completely saturating the wood with a polymer resin so it is in effect more like a plastic composite than natural wood but retains the grain and appearance of wood. As long as the process has bee carried out correctly this should make the ...



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