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21

It is used to store the sleeping bag, in order to retain the loft. It is not a good idea to store your sleeping bag compressed as small as possible as this will damage the fill. This is very important with down, a little less with synthetic but overall it is crucial to the life of the sleeping bag. A couple things to remember are you want to ensure the ...


12

Here is a bridge design we (the Town of Groton Massachusetts Trails Committee) used recently that seems to work. It feels plenty strong and sturdy when walking on it. The first bridge of this kind was only installed two months ago, so we don't yet have any direct evidence how long it lasts. However, we were generally pleased with the outcome, and are ...


10

There's one good way to make sure that your crampons last forever and are completely safe against failure in the field, which is to leave them in a closet and never use them. Assuming that you are going to use them, you can try to avoid walking on bare rocks in them. Walking on rocks will dull the points and will also stress the metal by repeatedly bending ...


7

From experience with small sections I have used hand sanitizer and it works. My parents used to use baking soda for our pop up camper. It was a thicker material then a tent, but it cleaned and absorbed a lot of sticky substances.


6

For cams, Black Diamond recommends: With occasional use: slings should be replaced every 5-8 years With frequent use: slings should be replaced 2-5 years. This sounds like a good policy for any other soft good (from tricams to harnesses). As you mentioned, harsher use or any sign of damage can significantly reduce this time frame. Some other resources: ...


6

From looking at the Crazy Glue Website and from reading what it can be used for on the packages, I wouldn't try it on fabric, especially synthetic things like a rain jacket. There does appear to be a Crazy Glue for wood and leather. Check the website. http://www.krazyglue.com/products/product.aspx?pc=KG821 Read the directions. I have used some other ...


5

I emailed Feathered Friends and PHD about this issue. I only got a reply from FF so far: A compression bag greatly reduces the size of a sleeping bag. There is no limitation to compressing down, as long as the down is not being stored compressed for an extended period of time, It will not be damaged.if you are taking it out and using it everyday. ...


5

I've seen people use a soldering iron and a piece kf abs plastic to repair tears in the hull but the best answer is short and simple to use for small holes: epoxy putty. just follow instructions on the packaging, fill the hole with a small (few mm) overlap inside and out and if you want sand down when hard and paint.


5

Here is a pretty good article on repairing fiberglass hulls. Its aimed at dinghy's but I guess the same principles apply. Youtube also has many videos on fibreglass repair. The small leaks should be reasonably easy to fix. Especially if it is just the gelcoat that is damaged rather than a complete hole. The gelcoat is the hard outer waterproof layer which ...


5

Personally I have not found backpacks to be very high-maintenance. After a trip I completely empty my pack, shake it out, and wipe off the dust with a damp cloth. If there's sap or other problems I'd try spot cleaning them with mild detergent, but so far I've been lucky. One thing I'm careful to do (with tents and other gear as well as packs) is to prop ...


4

For water-resistant or water-proof gear, I apply a DWR (durable water repellent) finish via aerosol spray about once or twice a year to gear that absolutely needs it (rain shell, rain pants, hiking pants, boots). I try to do this as infrequently as possible, or before a winter trips where failure of the membrane would be very unpleasant or dangerous. For ...


4

It is most likely not sap but the excretion from Aphids (Greenfly). They suck the sap from the tree and then excrete this sticky substance, often called Honeydew. It may be worth contacting the tent manufacturers for advice, but I would suggest careful washing first with just water and if that isn't enough, try with some soap flakes (like Dreft).


4

Over compressing any bag, whether it be down or synthetic, will eventually lead to loft degradation. If you compress your bag too tight you can cause damage to the barbs and barbules of the feathers, which will decrease loft over time, but this is apparently less of an issue with higher quality down. To be honest, I think you would have to have one ...


3

In addition to everything suggested by @Ben Crowell, you will also prolong the life of the crampons if you become very skilled at moving in them. That is, every step or climbing move should be graceful and precise, so that you are not bashing any of the points on anything, ever. Not only will this be good for your crampons, but it will also be good for ...


2

The main issue with repairing plastic hulls is that is that most adhesives don't bond very well to the plastic. For temporary repairs duct tape is the way to go. Its quite adhesive and waterproof. If the hole is too big use the duct tape to secure something else waterproof (e.g plyboard or plastic) in place. If possible try and do both inside and out. If ...


2

It's quite common to melt in some plastic - but be sure to get the same as the boat is made of. Most are PE so try to get some of that -- avoid ABS. Kits are available (random web example). The general recommendation among people I know who've done this is to use a hot air gun rather than a naked flame. You can also overfill a touch and smooth down ...


2

For from upto small leak holes to upto coin-sized holes, You can possibly use a Duct tape on the both sides. One more thing to add between the Duct Tape's point of contact is a filler like Some local Epoxy Compound product, or worst case a Chewing Gum (Chewed one :D). For a crack, you might just get it fixed by a Duct Tape.


2

What I believe was left out, is the occasional recoating of exposed steel surfaces with a Teflon coating such as Tuf Cloth or other suitable rust inhibitor. This will aid in protection when the original steel surface is exposed over time. Stainless steels (I will assume your material is a Cr/Mo alloy here) do eventually rust especially with rough use, wet ...


2

From the Krazy glue web site There are a few things Instant Krazy Glue® is not intended for use on such as paper, foam, rear view mirrors, polyethylene, Teflon® or other fluorocarbons. From that list I'd basically say any form of plastic isn't going to get along. Lots of outdoor gear are effectively made from various forms of plastic so I would not ...


2

Wash them with a product made for washing leather shoes, like Nikwax Footwear Cleaning Gel. This will remove the crud without damaging the oils in the leather. Then re-waterproof them with a product made for waterproofing leather (e.g. an aqueous wax product). Nikwax also makes some of those. I have used both the cleaner and waterproofer and been happy ...


2

I asked this question to my mother who knows well the quality of down. During your trek, if you compress your down sleeping bag a lot and if it's a very good quality down (90-10 or 95-5), you shouldn't have any problem in your trekking. It's very important when you return home to bring air to your sleeping until your next adventure; hang it in your closet! ...


2

I always think it's good to review the reasons why this is an issue first. Down works by trapping air in the soft fibrous parts of the feathers. the feathers also interlock naturally via a series of barbs and hooks on the ends of the down fibres. The down itself doesn't insulate, the air trapped between the down is the real insulation. The best way to trap ...


1

If it's honeydew, then soap & water should do the trick. Do not use harsh soap. An alternative method is to use a gritty, oily mixture to rub it out. I'm thinking maybe baking soda & vegetable oil. The grit helps break up the sticky substance, and the oil keeps it from re-sticking. Similar to using peanut butter to get gum out of your hair. Then ...


1

Dear Mr. Vitkov, we would rather suggest to proceed in this way: wrinkle with a brush the external part in order to leave out the dirty parts; then you need to take out the Insole and wash the Insole and the internal part of the boot with some detergent; for the external part of the boot, please do not wash using the detergent cos it ...


1

Put dish wash powder in and fill with hot water it will fizz let sit over night (don't put cap on gases will blow it off) was out it will look like new.



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