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9

According to Will Gadd, you should sharpen your crampons and ice tools after every use. If you spend just a minute or two after each trip–sometimes you won't even need a minute, just give them a look over and a couple passes with the file to take off a couple burrs–then you're never going to have to worry about dull points. Regular maintenance also ensures ...


9

I usually sharp my crampons when I am expecting icy conditions, that means glare ice. Especially when you go steep and need front point technique, you need to rely on those points - all your bodys weight. If your front spikes are too coarse, you need much more energy to bring them secure and stable into the ice. Besides that, the ice will splinter and break ...


8

There is a UIAA certification for slings just as is there are for (nearly?) all critical recreational climbing gear. You should only have reslinging done by a company that produces UIAA certified climbing softgoods. Certification logo: http://www.theuiaa.org/upload_area/Safety/Standards/Safety-Standards/UIAA_104_Slings_March_2013.pdf


8

In simple terms. Yes. But it is easily avoided. When not in use dry off the bow and keep it in a waterproof case. Like anything, prolonged moisture is damaging. Using it in the rain is no problem, I'm talking about days or weeks without being dryed. Same goes with the string. They are usually coated in beeswax but moisture will eventually take effect. It'...


8

You should clean all guns at the end of every session of use for a few reasons. I am assuming .22 or .17 cal since you said rimfire. These are the most common rimfire calibers. to prevent residue buildup which can be dangerous if a bullet gets lodged in the barrel, and even more dangerous if you somehow don't notice and shoot another round which I suppose ...


8

They are user replaceable, in fact some manufacturers recommend replacing slings every 2-5 years if they're very frequently used, but they're only user replaceable if you know how to sew structural climbing gear and have the equipment to bartack a loop of SuperTape or 10mm Dynex. The simplest thing to do is simply replace the worn sling with 1" tube ...


8

As mentioned in comments, this option to coil a rope will get you some twists in it. So I do not recommend it for longer ropes (i.e. your climbing ropes), as twists are very inconvenient when belaying. This mode is mainly suited for cordelettes that you want to attach to your harness and therefore should be compact. To create such a coil follow these steps: ...


7

Ordinary vegetable oils of the type used for cooking will work but are not ideal. Over time they will gradually oxidise and may be colonised by bacteria, both of which can cause them to become acidic which can itself cause corrosion of the metal. Also vegetable oils can become gummy and sticky in quite a short period of time. Oils help to prevent ...


6

Silpoly is based on polyester, which means it's hydrophobic (doesn't absorb water). Not all slippery materials are hydrophobic, but this definitely factors in. Silicone sealant also repels water, but through different properties. Those different properties are also the ones that let it adhere to many different surfaces. Silicone has a high coefficient of ...


5

I will not address the issue of whether the helmet in question is still usable or should be retired but instead answer the main question: How to wash a foam helmet? Generally water must not damage any kind of helmet you want to use for climbing, as it has to be usable in long constant rain. So rinsing with water without additives is certainly save. The ...


5

The information you need is on the manufacturers website. We offer servicing for DMM Cams (trigger wires and slings), and Torque Nuts (slings) if they pass a quality inspection. Prior to sending them to us, we ask you to inspect and assess your gear in accordance to the supplied user instructions and inspection criteria. for others considering ...


5

Refer A Beginner's Guide to Hunting with a Crossbow You cock before you load an arrow.... You can leave your bow cocked all day (provided that you remove the arrow before walking or exiting a tree stand, of course), but you should uncock the bow at the end of the hunt. Clearly, you should not be walking around all day with an arrow in a cocked ...


5

I clean all of my firearms, including rimfires, on about the same schedule: A light cleaning/oiling. I swab the inside of the barrel with an oil-dampened (just oil) cloth AND very lightly coat all easily-accessible metal surfaces: After each use. After exposure to the elements. (I was on a backcountry hunting trip in central Idaho once where the fog, rain ...


4

Edit: My bad. Poster is asking for globe -- the glass enclosure on the outside, not the fine thorium oxide ash mantle that breaks so easily. In passing: The lantern can be operated without a globe. I would hesitate to use it in adverse weather. The mantles are fragile and a strong wind or a raindrop can do them in, but for inside or on calm evenings, ...


4

I'm not a materials scientist, so can't give you a definitive answer. But I do know that if you make your own silnylon or silpoly by soaking the base fabric in a solution of silicone and mineral spirit and air-drying, the final material is far less slippery than commercial silnylon/silpoly. So it seems that the slippery finish of the commercial materials ...


4

If it's mold based, then my understanding is that borax or hydrogen peroxide are effective remedies. Soap is not very effective against mold. If you don't think it will damage the awning, I recommend scrubbing it with a borax-based solution. When in doubt, test it on a small less-visible section first.


3

Seam sealant should do just fine. I use this particular one which has worked well for a number of patch jobs. If the exist tape is dirty or damaged then you will want to trip it off and put on new tape. It will interfere with getting good seal.


3

You're definitely right to be looking into repairs for your kayak and I'm afraid, although duct tape may seem a quick solution, when you take to the water you'll want something more resilient! You may find this article on how to make repairs to fibreglass boats of interest: http://www.epoxycraft.com/blog-preparing-for-a-fibreglass-boat-repair-part-i/


2

Typically these are not meant to be messed with. Even if you could get to the knot I'd imagine you would struggle to get it un-done. Basically, in my experience, cutting it is often the best/only solution. Just try and save as much cord as you can. FYI tent pole repair companies will often sell extra cord should you need it.


1

For marine covers there are some cleaning products made on purpose that you could use on the awning too. The DIY route consists in solutions of bleach+water or ammonia+water that tend to be nasty to deal with and dispose of (cant just let them on the ground), they do work. Peroxide is another solution, safer but a bit less effective. Beware that they can ...


1

From the sales material you quote it sounds like the 'wood' in question has been vacuum stabilised. This involves completely saturating the wood with a polymer resin so it is in effect more like a plastic composite than natural wood but retains the grain and appearance of wood. As long as the process has bee carried out correctly this should make the ...


1

In school I shot competitive rimfire with valuable Anschutz .22LR rifles. Our team didn't clean our rifles until the end of the season, even though we fired thousands of rounds through them during practice and competition. The problem with cleaning is that it takes barrels some number of "fouling" shots before they reach some equilibrium where peak shot-to-...


1

Have you tried tossing it in a dryer on Air Fluff with some tennis balls, for a little while? Edit: See also suggestions here.



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