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8

You should clean all guns at the end of every session of use for a few reasons. I am assuming .22 or .17 cal since you said rimfire. These are the most common rimfire calibers. to prevent residue buildup which can be dangerous if a bullet gets lodged in the barrel, and even more dangerous if you somehow don't notice and shoot another round which I suppose ...


7

According to Will Gadd, you should sharpen your crampons and ice tools after every use. If you spend just a minute or two after each trip–sometimes you won't even need a minute, just give them a look over and a couple passes with the file to take off a couple burrs–then you're never going to have to worry about dull points. Regular maintenance also ensures ...


7

I usually sharp my crampons when I am expecting icy conditions, that means glare ice. Especially when you go steep and need front point technique, you need to rely on those points - all your bodys weight. If your front spikes are too coarse, you need much more energy to bring them secure and stable into the ice. Besides that, the ice will splinter and break ...


5

Refer A Beginner's Guide to Hunting with a Crossbow You cock before you load an arrow.... You can leave your bow cocked all day (provided that you remove the arrow before walking or exiting a tree stand, of course), but you should uncock the bow at the end of the hunt. Clearly, you should not be walking around all day with an arrow in a cocked ...


5

I clean all of my firearms, including rimfires, on about the same schedule: A light cleaning/oiling. I swab the inside of the barrel with an oil-dampened (just oil) cloth AND very lightly coat all easily-accessible metal surfaces: After each use. After exposure to the elements. (I was on a backcountry hunting trip in central Idaho once where the fog, rain ...


4

If it's mold based, then my understanding is that borax or hydrogen peroxide are effective remedies. Soap is not very effective against mold. If you don't think it will damage the awning, I recommend scrubbing it with a borax-based solution.


3

You're definitely right to be looking into repairs for your kayak and I'm afraid, although duct tape may seem a quick solution, when you take to the water you'll want something more resilient! You may find this article on how to make repairs to fibreglass boats of interest: http://www.epoxycraft.com/blog-preparing-for-a-fibreglass-boat-repair-part-i/


3

Seam sealant should do just fine. I use this particular one which has worked well for a number of patch jobs. If the exist tape is dirty or damaged then you will want to trip it off and put on new tape. It will interfere with getting good seal.


2

Typically these are not meant to be messed with. Even if you could get to the knot I'd imagine you would struggle to get it un-done. Basically, in my experience, cutting it is often the best/only solution. Just try and save as much cord as you can. FYI tent pole repair companies will often sell extra cord should you need it.


1

In school I shot competitive rimfire with valuable Anschutz .22LR rifles. Our team didn't clean our rifles until the end of the season, even though we fired thousands of rounds through them during practice and competition. The problem with cleaning is that it takes barrels some number of "fouling" shots before they reach some equilibrium where peak ...


1

Have you tried tossing it in a dryer on Air Fluff with some tennis balls, for a little while? Edit: See also suggestions here.



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