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12

There are several ways to determine true north, especially when you have a map and compass: Competent maps, like most intended for backcountry hiking, will have the magnetic declination marked. This is usually in one of the corners. Take a look at any USGS topo map, for example. The compass will tell you the direction to magnetic north, and the map tells ...


11

Of course, there are many long-distance hiking trails without any available maps. As far as I'm aware, none of the European long-distance trails have dedicated end-to-end maps, unless you count Openstreetmap or a collection of several hundred topographic maps. In some places they're well-mapped, e.g. when passing through Switzerland, Germany, or France, ...


10

GPS is simply not a good way to measure trail distance. This is because the raw GPS fixes have a lot of noise on them. If you take them literally, then you get a much longer distance than you actually moved. If you low pass filter them too much, you cut off corners and get a shorter distance. The usual algorithm is to apply some low pass filtering, but ...


8

There are two main things that can go wrong with gps accuracy. The first is the quality of the signal, which can be less than for a dedicated gps unit (less space for an antenna and other design compromises). Of course the question of how you carry it comes into play here (a low pocket isn't very good and this may be worse than with a dedicated unit ...


6

The topics of navigation and cartography are two sides of the same coin, and there are entire books written about each. It is interesting to study the history of cartography because it very graphically shows the corresponding improvements in navigation over time. In order to make an accurate map, you need to know first where you are making your ...


6

The Kungsleden (lit. kings way in Swedish) is a 440 km long trail in northern Sweden/Scandinavia. From Wiki: The trail is separated in four portions which each represent approximately one week of hiking. The most practiced part is by far the northernmost, between Abisko and Kebnekaise. The season, when the huts are open usually runs between mid-...


5

We have an article about this topic, since Gaia GPS users frequently ask - why GPS recording can be inaccurate. The short answer is, as others have said, GPS isn't perfectly accurate. If you compare a GPS measurement to a measurement from a measuring wheel, there will be a discrepancy in stat calculations, regardless of GPS chip or post-processing ...


4

Ignoring the difficulties of travel (in summer you may need a boat, in winter, skis), then the current weather will make more difference then the season. Given the correct time and standard navigation tables, you can get the latitude by measuring the angle from the horizon to the limb of the sun, the limb of the moon, or to a bright star. Winter might allow ...


3

I have used the free caltopo.com for my recent trips. They use 7.5 minute quadrangles and stitch them together seemlessly. It is possible to create custom maps by creating tracks or import tracks created with Google Earth. They also have a topographical image overlay for Google Earth, which I have used extensively.


3

I have the $0.99 app, "Footpath Route Planner - Running / Cycling / Hiking Maps". ref: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/footpath-route-planner-running/id634845718?mt=8 I end up using RideWithGPS on the desktop to map all my bike, run, hike routes but if you're looking for just an iOS version, this is certainly the nicest UI and UX that I've found. Both ...


2

You can make your own easy enough. Just print onto a clear transparency (used primarily in overhead projectors). Tape that onto some clear plastic (can purchase at Home Depot and maybe art store).


2

Map scales are decided by the cartographer based on what they think is the the best scale for the map they're producing. This is naturally a judgment call sort of like the projection of the map. If you feel like the cartographer's choice is unbearable then I'd suggest you find a different map that covers the same territory. I believe you can find complete ...


2

You can't ignore the difficulties. Those difficulties are precisely what dictated when you could attempt the trip. For the most part, those limitations still exist. However for the actual calculation and finding of the North Pole, that would be night time, when you could calculate how far away from the pole you actually were, and also whether you are ...


2

We could get really complicated with this. But basically, magnetic north is a mostly fixed place on the surface of the earth. It's actually moving, but very slowly. Sometimes the map you have may have two compass circles on it. One inside the other. The inner circle identifies magnetic north, and the outer circle identified true north. In addition, the map ...


2

At night it is very easy to find true north using the stars (true south doesn't quite have an equivalent.) First identify Ursa Major, the Great Bear or Big Dipper. Then take the two stars at the end of it away from the handle, and follow the line they make for 5 times its length. The star you hit is Polaris. Head towards it and you are heading towards true ...


2

You need to do some research on the area that you are traveling on. Google maps or the NOAA maps using seaclearII.exe will allow you the ability to make a map guide, that you can annotate as you travel. mark off 100 yard and point to point track measurments. If you are going to dead recon from point to point on a river as an exercise or recreation you might ...


1

One of the primary techniques is the use of Dead Reckoning although the secrets of long distance Polynesian maritime navigation still remain a mystery despite huge evidence of their wayfinding ability. The easiest way for maritime navigators to map locations was to build on the predecessors knowledge through the use of the Periplus. It served the same ...


1

A 1/25000 map gives you roughly 5 km by 7,5. With 4cm overlap between maps, you have 1km overlap, that should be enough. What I did last time was to scan all the maps for the whole trip, join them in one big image, then cut 1-page-sized images from the map, with clear overlap from one to the next. Knowing exactly what path I would follow allowed me to ...


1

I'm looking for the exact same thing. I'm using Guthook's AT Guide for Android to figure out bite size pieces of the trail and if it let you mark sections as complete, it'd be absolutely perfect. I'll prolly stick with that and then a printed map with highlighter for that pretty and satisfying map view...


1

You can browse the 1:50,000 Topographic Map of New Zealand here: https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/767-nz-topo50-maps/ You can download it too but: a) you need to register with a valid email address and create a password b) the whole thing is about 10GB and you can only download 2GB at at time Just set a crop around the area you're interested in and you ...



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