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5

I would recommend a site like CalTopo (my favorite) or Hillmap; you can import GPX files into them, or click on points to define a path. For Caltopo, creating a path by clicking might not be immediately obvious; first choose "Add New Object", then select "Line", and once you've edited any details you can click each waypoint or hold down shift while ...


4

Pythagoras is actually exactly what you would use, approximated as finely as you need for accuracy. What I mean by approximated, is: If you are following a continuous incline, you really only need one right angled triangle to calculate your hypotenuse, but if your incline varies, a more accurate figure will be gained by taking each change of incline as a ...


4

In places where the contour lines are closer together, the slope is steeper. Where the lines are further apart, the slope is gentler. In a spot where you see several lines merge together, that is a sheer drop-off. Avoid those, obviously. Look for nesting Vs on the map. These are ridges, or possibly ravines. Water (blue) bisecting the V will tell you it is a ...


4

The easiest option is to use this website: Garmin.Openstreetmap.nl It has an option to select just the map tiles you want, so you can get a map for a fairly small area if you want. To do this, choose the option for "Enable manual tile selection", then click on the tiles to select them. Then enter your email address, and click the button for "Build my map". ...


4

Walk the line on a humid very cold still morning. If the hot spring is of any significance -- e.g. enough surface to get in, and enough flow to be hot, -- you should get a plume of steam rising off the water. This will likely require an air water temperature differential of at least 40 degrees F to be visible. I have seen 'steam' (fog) tendrils off of ...


3

Many printer drivers and other software allow you to "tile" a large document or a magnified one on multiple pages. You can usually specify the overlap between pages, which only needs to be enough for you to cut cleanly. 0.1 inch is usually good enough. Acrobat reader may even have such a option. I know I've done this a few times with my printer, a ...


3

Most applications will let you minimise your margins, which reduces waste, then all you do is cut the margin off one page, and then stick that page over the other one, which gives you a solid connection - adhesive tape front and back.


3

It helps to know what is going on underground when looking for geological patters. Hot springs are of course geothermally heated by pockets of magma in the crust that are relatively close to the surface. Understanding the underlaying strata and ground water patters are essential to accurately predicting where hydraulic phenomena will appear. At the very ...


3

For central Europe I can recommend www.wanderreitkarte.de, which is a German site but has also an English and Italian language layer. Its data is based on openstreetmap data which is (at least in Germany) much more detailed off the beaten track than google maps is. Unfortunately it does not contain Norway, where your hike has obviously been done. ...


3

Bing maps supports topo-maps (in the UK at least and not on the mobile client) via the ordanace survey


2

So if we'd walked, say 10Km as the "crow flies" and climbed 1Km how far had we actually walked (roughly)? (looks like Math Markup isn't enabled here?) km = sqrt( distance^2 + elevation^2 ) = sqrt( 10^2 + 1^2 ) You added a whole 50 meters to your hike with that 1km elevation gain. That's assuming a steady slope. If the route is up hill and down ...


2

What exactly do you want to measure? If you want to estimate shoe usage, it would be better to measure steps, not the distance. If you want to estimate fatigue, than there's a heuristic, you should assume that 100m up is the equivalent of 1km on flat terrain. So you have walked 20 km equivalents. It has taken you twice as much time as you would be ...


2

You can get a good estimate of the distance walked by timing or pacing. Naismith's Rule (a way of estimating the time to walk a distance when ascents are involved) can help with the timing aspect but is only an estimation of the time taken to walk a certain distance taking ups and down into account. From the knowledge of expected average speed and time ...


2

I had a similar question (which I have deleted) relating to the UK, here's what I found (from comments to my deleted Q and from answers here) that varies from the other answers here I primarily wanted to draw a post-walk track from memory as a longer term record of where I'd been. I carry a GPS but don't turn it on unless I'm lost (it's hard to be lost in ...


1

I don't know about online website, but you can use a handheld GPS like Etrex to keep track of your progress. And since this stores GPS in a common format, you can import this data into another program that will render it in Google Maps which you can then display on your web browser.


1

In terms of planning distances I figure 5:1 for elevation. That is, a meter up effectively adds 5 meters horizontally. This is true for up and down both. In practice the up part takes longer for any but the most fit, but coming down is still slower than flat (you are picking your foot landing more carefully.) Both going up and going down you are taking ...



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