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Anecdotally - yes. I've heard it is possible, read it is possible, and have successfully done so myself while working in Wyoming's Wind River Range (on par with Alaska for its mosquitoes). Caveats: Although you might stop itching and swelling, you won't build up an immunity to West Nile, Dengue, Malaria, etc if they occur in your area. In my ...


3

http://www.mosquito.org/faq How fast can mosquitoes fly? Depending upon the species, mosquitoes can fly at about 1 to 1.5 miles per hour. I got that source from this recent article about using a fan to keep mosquitoes away. It seems mosquitoes are slow fliers. A normal walking pace should be enough to out run them. That being said, you can ...


3

Yes, increased exposure can reduce the ellergic reaction that results in the itching and swelling. The very first time we are bitten by a mosquito, nothing happens. That triggers the immune system in a way that subsequent bytes cause a allergic response. There are roughly two levels of "immunity" to mosquitos that in most people can be brought on by high ...


2

I wanted to add some points to the discussion, as well as list another product. First, as noted, 100% DEET is overkill. Once you go over 35%, it doesn't get better. Second, DEET is not good for you. Not saying don't use it, but try to use the minimum needed. What I like to use is permethrin. This is used on gear and clothing, not skin, and stays active ...


1

In case you don't have anything to put on your bites, i found out the following. If you got snow around you, put a piece of metal (i prefer a spoon) in the snow or cold water, and wait for it to nearly freeze. And then just put the freezing cold spoon on the bite You can also heat a spoon (or just use a lighter directly) and as soon as you won't burn ...



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