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20

Fastpacking is lightweight or ultralight mountain travel with the aim of covering big distances over extended trips. Base weights would typically range between 8lbs-15lbs (3.5-7kg) or even less, so packs should be light enough to enable at least some of the trail to be covered with a running gait. There's a lot of emphasis on using your skills and experience ...


19

I was thinking about this question while rappelling over an overhang this evening with my little girl and payed attention to exactly what I do: Plant your feet on the edge of the overhang, keep your legs straight, and let the rope through your descender until your body has cleared the roof. Think of the wall as flat ground, you want your body as ...


11

This is not a direct answer but more of an extended comment about safety when rappelling on overhanging terrain. When rappelling over an overhang or an overhanging wall, make sure that you are certain that you will be able to reach the ground. Ideally you know that both ends of your rope are touching the ground. If your rope doesn't reach the ground you ...


7

I'm not aware of any special technique, as it mostly does depend on the actual situation. If you already rappelled quite a length, then the force pulling you to the rock might not be to great anymore, and if you feel confident you can certainly just take a big leap to cross the overhang. Otherwise I'd go slow. When rappelling you usually lean back and push ...


5

I'm not sure how your setup is, but I'd try a Purcell prussik or something similar. Animated example You must test its holding Power on paracord yourself, but on climbing cord it's solid enough.


4

For non FKT (Fastest Known Time) chasers fastpacking is aimed at keeping a 3-5 miles per hour pace with the goal of covering 25-40 miles per day. I found that fastpacking can be very demanding and settled on ultrapacking (my term...) that is more about slow endurance than speed, aiming for 2.5-3.5 mph over 10-12 hours with no breaks, using similar methods ...


2

This reminds me of basic training when I was in the military. We started with the basics and went backwards over a 30' rock wall then I think it was a 90-100' rock wall backwards. When you do it the first time, the most unnatural thing was going from standing on the edge and letting the rope through your hands until you were still standing at the edge but ...


2

The type of knot you are looking for a called a friction hitch, or a slide and grip knot which is a kind of knot used to attach one rope to another in a way that is easily adjusted. There are many different ways to tie a friction hitch: Klemheist Blake's Hitch Distel Hitch Rolling Hitch Prussic Bachmann Hitch Autoblock Hitch And of course the Purcell ...


2

Here is a reliable medical source of the causes, symptoms and advised medical responses for altitude sickness of varying degrees. Cleveland Clinic - Altitude Sickness information Altitude Sickness Explanation Altitude sickness can affect anyone who goes to high altitudes without giving the body time to adjust to the changes in air pressure and oxygen ...


1

I have the truly terrible technique of rappelling down to the point of the overhang, stopping, turning sideways so the rope is only half my hips width away from the cliff, then continuing. It makes me look like a rank amateur.



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