Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

I personally had a similar sort of a question when I first went through similar kind of stats about these mountains. Getting introduced with these stats is different than totally understanding the mountain and the pandora box it opens. For getting acquainted with the reasons for so many failed attempts, one needs to read tactical data and expedition reports. ...


10

I'll be sticking to the "Descend and the Knee pain" part of the discussion here. Yeah, there is no doubt that a descend definitely make a knee-pain worst. (I am strictly sticking to the point that its not caused solely by descending the mountain). The intensity can wary person to person and that is depending upon habits one has developed over the time. ...


9

Anecdotally, the only three factors which may cause you problems are: supplies running out losing fitness boredom And these are really only an issue if you are stuck for extended periods of time. Your solutions are: exercises you can do in your tent, or just outside - stretches, press-ups, sit-ups, basic cardio - will help you maintain a level of ...


8

Several things kill people on mountains, many of these are within the individuals control (ensuring they have the right kit, etc.) I'm going to ignore these because all things being equal these should be relatively static (i.e. the mountain itself doesn't make a person more or less well prepared) So here are some factors that affect how dangerous or not a ...


7

A crevasse that wide cannot just be jumped across (unless you're among the top long jumpers of the world), therefore you have only two possibilities: avoid it or build a bridge over it. Typically such bridges are built using aluminum ladders (cf. image below) that are placed across the crevasse and fixed on both sides. In the ideal case one also builds some ...


5

I would say it is likely you can have issues with your knees when you get older as a mountaineer - in the same way someone who regularly runs on the roads can get damaged knees, in this case it is recommended to run on grass (as it's obviously more cushioned) or on uneven ground such as in a forest, which is usually a mix of leaf litter and harder ground - ...


4

First thing you need to ask yourself is why is their so much rubbish? Getting things up and down to Everest base camp is exhausting! The Sherpa's (who do the vast majority of the lifting and carrying and are not typically paid well) have no incentive to carry down things that the (majority) western clients don't ask about. No client has ever asked where ...


4

You asked about dosing. My recommendation is to get a professional to figure out the dosing. If you cannot get a professional, then do not carry this as you are potentially introducing as much risk as you are mitigating. When carrying a medication such as this for a possible emergency, there are several things I would recommend. Get a doctor to prescribe ...


4

I've been a martial artist for over 30 years in a style which puts a lot of strain on your knees, as well as regular cyclist, occasional skier, hiker and ice-skater. I damaged a knee cartilage and tendons over 20 years ago and have to be careful and have particularly noticed problems hiking. One thing which has helped a lot is long-term consumption of ...


4

I don't think you have to treat that topic significantly different than on lower altitudes (but I have to admit, I have never been higher than 4300 m) as long as you stick to trekking. As you already introduce your question, warming up is especially important for sports where maximum strength (e.g. climbing) and/or explosive muscle movement (e.g. ...


4

The insoles typically are the first thing that gets worn out. Insoles will eventually flatten from the weight of your body. this will then put downward pressure on your arches. Insoles get flattened from use and no longer hold your heel in the correct place. I've had tough and irritating times when my insoles got so flat that, in wet conditions, they would ...


3

Firstly, the technique you describe is actually called "Moving together" at least by British climbers. The technique is used to move rapidly on relatively easy ground while also providing a degree of protection from falls. It is also used to rope up while crossing glaciers. This website has a good set of photos showing how to attach the rope to your harness ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible