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8

This is a bad plan for several reasons. YakTrax are not well suited for this situation. YakTrax are more specialized for people who want to go running on city streets in places with cold winters. For mountaineering, they're basically useless. They don't give enough extra traction. Microspikes or crampons would be more appropriate. Roping up is a ...


7

There's a discussion of this in Freedom of the Hills. The question refers to snow, but usually this is done on ice (or very hard snow). One reason would be if not everybody in the group has crampons. For example, mountain guides in East Africa usually can't afford crampons. Historically, the technique was developed before crampons were invented. Even if ...


7

In a sense, yes. While mountains don't literally "make their own weather," they do sometimes provide additional catalysts to create localized disturbances which you might otherwise characterize as "weather" (thunderstorms, clouds, rain, etc). In a broader global sense, weather events occur when masses of air with differing characteristics suddenly collide. ...


6

One of the big reasons that we seem to be 'caught' by the weather when we're on the mountain is that the mountain forces otherwise harmless air to ascend and condense. As the warm and moist air is forced to ascend the mountain, the air quickly cools and reaches its dew point, water droplets form and a vicious cycle is set in motion. This is especially true ...


6

The most obvious thing is an emergency blanket. It will add a lot of extra insulation per gram. It'a good to have one in you bag on any trip. However, a mere blanket is definitely not enough for all seasons, elevations and weather conditions. When planning at home, you should ask yourself a question: "What will happen to me if I have to be on the route ...


5

I wouldn't recommend gaining 3700+ meters in 2 days. It's not about fitness. It's just about how well your body adapts to altitude. I agree that 3700 meters is not too high to get severely sick due to AMS, but then, it's not recommended to gain more than 1000 meters of vertical distance per day. Also, I know friends who have suffered from altitude sickness ...


5

I always take a fist-sized SOL emergency bivy bag and a couple of strong black garbage bags. That way you can stuff food and even your body in the bags when conditions are cold and wet. I have also converted a garbage bag into a spare insulating clothing layer by tearing holes for arms and legs. Essential for climbers are a whistle for signalling and a ...


4

I know the author of the original question has already make their purchase, but for anyone else out there, I would recommend getting a set of mountain-grade leather boots, like the La Sportiva Nepal. They are much kinder to your feet - plastic boots break your feet in, not the other way around!


4

Whoever told you C1 are aimed at 'more advanced users' than C2 is plain wrong. Crampon grades are really about where and how you plan to use them, rather than how good you are. Here's a typically thorough and useful article by Andy Kirkpatrick, here: http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/getting_the_right_crampon Also, the BMC have some good ...


4

It's good for a question on SE to be focused. However, there is a broader context here, which is that you want your activities to be (a) safe and (b) comfortable and enjoyable, so that you'll want to continue doing winter mountaineering rather than letting your crampons gather dust in a closet. In this context, the exact choice of crampons is a relatively ...


4

Cordelettes are an American obsession. In the UK and Europe most people climb multipitch on double ropes. In this case, and if one is swapping leads, then an anchor with up to four pieces with the rope is trivially easy. Clove hitch to first piece, little loop of slack, clove hitch to second piece, tie rope back to locker krab on harness. Repeat with second ...


4

Roping up would be a bad idea. A good rule of thumb is that you should only rope up if you can place protection between climbers (i.e. attach the rope to something). Glaciers are a different story, but that's not where you're going. Many accidents have occurred when one rope mate falls and takes all the others with them. As far as using YaxTrax , that is ...


4

I can only partially answer this question, and my information is not particularly up-to-date, but I've contacted a friend who has been there recently and added his answers to my own. In April 2004 I flew Kathmandu-Lukla, and returned via bus from Jiri to Kathmandu. I remember the flight costing about a hundred dollars. My friend flew in September 2013, and ...


4

It depends on the nature of the deficiency. The most common form, red-green colorblindness, isn't a problem: I'm not aware of any situation where color coding is used to convey safety-critical information. On the other hand, if you've got rod monochromacy, climbing mountains is probably a bad idea.


3

The German Wikipedia article on thermals is also quite nice (better than the English). In higher latitudes the sun shines closer to orthogonal on the sun side of a mountain face. Compared to a flat landscape more heat is transfered to the air immediately above the surface, and it starts flowing up. Not necessarily directly vertical, but if the soil/rock is ...


3

A cordolette gives you the most versatility and is definitely the way to go in most situations, especially if you are relatively new to climbing. A disclaimer before I elaborate any further: Reading a book on anchor-building is not enough to be able to construct a save belay anchor. Read the book and then have an experienced climber teach you in the ...


3

Looks like you'll need Newmatic crampons. The Charmoz GTX has a heel bail but no toe bail, which means you will need a strap over the toe. Many crampons today come with a choice of configuration between a step-in or toe-strap, and most step-ins can be refitted with a toe-strap after the fact as well. The actual type and model of crampon recommended varies ...


3

Identifying peaks using a topo map may be difficult, because you need to reconstruct the 3D landscape in your head and decide which mountains are hidden behind others. So you can fly to the top of your mountain in Google Earth and adjust the tilt to see the panoramic view. This way you get a view, which is very similar to what you'll see in person. Than (or ...


2

I think anaheim brought up a lot of good points, but I would choose a super light biwi bag that is able to keep you dry whether the humidity comes from the inside (sweat) or the outside (rain). If I take an insulation mat with me depends on existing possibilities to use it. If there are no pedestals you can lay or sit on, I would leave it at home.


2

The most pressing points are good ground insulation(mat to lie down on) wind protection and then dry clothes. We lose 80% of body heat through the ground. Evaporation of sweat or humid clothes cool at an extremely fast rate too. The amount of heat transfer depends on the evaporation rate, however for each kilogram of water vaporized 2,257 kJ of energy are ...


2

I used to sleep some times in the Belgium Ardennes which have a very mild climate. For size, weight and especially cost reasons I used agricultural black plastic (don't know the official English term). Advantages: light easy to pack very cheap easily layerable waterproof when not needed anymore (e.g. after last night or only night) you can throw it away ...


2

Maybe you will find the PeakFinder applications for iOS helpful. There is another app that works with augmented reality. Check peaks-app.ch. Let us now if one of the apps helped. I recently used the SwissPeaks application and found it helpful. But without internet connection you're lost.


2

From looking at the pictures I would say that for the "default" conditions at summer glacier/alpine tours they should be perfectly fine. In dry but slightly coldish conditions they will give you good grip and rope handling, as long as you don't have to dig through snow with them. The reason why you have got cold fingers while cycling might be on the one ...


2

I don't know whether e.g. mountain guides for expeditions are accepted if they have color vision deficiency. But as a participant I don't think this is a no-go criteria. There were guys with asthma and other serious medical limitations going on 8000+ and Mark Inglis made it on the Everest with two artificial legs. I don't know what you suppose of a ...


2

British mountaineer Andy Kirkpatrick has quite a bit of useful information regarding how to look after your feet at altitude and in cold conditions on his website at http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/how_to_avoid_frostbitten_feet. The only recommendation on footwear size he gives with respect to high altitude, is for Neoprene socks. He ...


2

As other posters said, roping together is not a good idea, at least if you are not an experienced mountaineer. Now on how you can do your trip in safety. When walking on ice and frozen dirt, don't rely on self-arrest. You can self arrest on the steep (>5-10 degrees) ice only by hitting it hard with your ice-axe and only during the first second while you ...


2

Cutting the Ice steps is technique which is used since years, and rather was invented way before something like crampons came up in mountaineering. I met a team at Saser Kangri, who spent a lot of time in cutting steps in Ice. And, I could only ask them why to do it and invest so much of amount of energy and critical time when you have crampons? I ...


1

Here in California, our mountains influence our weather in a particular way. We have a Mediterranean climate and big mountain ranges inland. Storms build up out on the Pacific, and they blow in toward the land. Often they hold their moisture until they get to the mountains, at which point they dump it. For this reason, the seaward sides of our mountains tend ...


1

I did Teide last year aged 60; I'm fit, but not a climber as such - I occasionally do a few of the Scottish Munros and run 5 - 10k twice a week only. 20 years ago I did Mont Blanc in the Alps, which I found desperately hard, and didn't acclimatise at all well despite 3 days altitude preparation. Getting up and down Teide was easy in comparison. I left ...


1

Use a biodegradable (e.g. cornstarch-based) bag to pick up waste and then pack it in a airtight container. For obvious reasons the container should only be used for that purpose and disinfected when you return home ready to be reused next time. Also, look out for schemes such as Keep Cairngorm Snow White which provides biodegradable bags, a pot to carry the ...



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