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25

I personally had a similar sort of a question when I first went through similar kind of stats about these mountains. Getting introduced with these stats is different than totally understanding the mountain and the pandora box it opens. For getting acquainted with the reasons for so many failed attempts, one needs to read tactical data and expedition reports. ...


15

Apart from the practical advantages mentioned in practicality of beards, there's also some aspects that are special to remote and/or high altitude trekking: Melting snow to obtain water costs a lot of fuel (and time) which makes water quite a valuable good. You don't want to spend 10% or more of your expensively molten water just to pollute it with shaving ...


14

First of all: Walking a glacier contains some serious risks and roping up is not enough to cover that risks, but also knowledge of crevasse rescue is needed. Therefore I strongly recommend a glacier course where all those things are taught. Now for some basic things to consider when walking a glacier as a roped party: When walking a glacier, one normally ...


13

There are many types of specialized harnesses, including harnesses for sport, trad, and mountaineering. Personally I use the same harness for trad and mountaineering, and it works fine. For trad climbing, you want four gear loops. Since people don't carry such heavy racks for sport and mountaineering, some harnesses specialized for those activities may not ...


11

Collapse them down, sandwich them with the points facing each inwards, and wrap the straps around them. You can then use a "real" crampon bag to hold them, or improvise. Some ideas for packaging them include: Cut the top off a 2 liter soda bottle (use two bottles for full containment). Make or buy a heavy (e.g. 500D) cordura nylon bag. Cut off an old ...


11

For a guided glacier tour: No reason - go ahead and use it. I would not worry about resharpening, as from your description there are no steep ice sections on the route. If there are and you like using your own hands, start filing. The quick option is to keep the geometry and just sharpen everything. The longer one is to reshape the tip so it looks more like ...


10

The first thing you need to ask yourself is why is there so much rubbish? Getting things up and down to Everest base camp is exhausting! The Sherpas (who do the vast majority of the lifting and carrying, and are typically not paid well) have no incentive to carry down things that the majority of their western clients don't ask about. Clients typically don't ...


10

Several things kill people on mountains, many of these are within the individuals control (ensuring they have the right kit, etc.) I'm going to ignore these because all things being equal these should be relatively static (i.e. the mountain itself doesn't make a person more or less well prepared) So here are some factors that affect how dangerous or not a ...


10

Anecdotally, the only three factors which may cause you problems are: supplies running out losing fitness boredom And these are really only an issue if you are stuck for extended periods of time. Your solutions are: exercises you can do in your tent, or just outside - stretches, press-ups, sit-ups, basic cardio - will help you maintain a level of ...


9

If the glacier isn't snowless (aper) you can probe for spaces under the surface which should be noticed by less resistance in the snow/Firn. Still it is preferable to avoid going in regions where one would expect crevasses. This isn't easy like it is tough to know how the weather is going to evolve in the mountains. But still we could try to use some theory ...


9

Sometimes shadows or shapes in the snow give away the location of covered crevasses. Sometimes you can detect a crevasse with a shallow covering of snow by poking with an ice axe or a probe of some sort. The only sure way to detect if there is a crevasse is when you can see it, or when you fall into it when you cannot see it.


9

The answer of @BenediktBauer covers pretty much everything you have to know as a beginner on glaciers. What you also have to know is the proper knot (and that was the second part of your question). You can use the figure eight, like is recommended in sport climbing too (so most people will already know this knot). You of course have to watch out, because of ...


9

I had always assumed that after you adapted to the thin air, the risk to your body was how thick your blood got with the production of extra red blood cells to compensate for the lack of oxygen. an increase of red blood cells will only happen after a long period of time. This is why athletes often train at high altitude. this is a very gradual ...


9

A crevasse that wide cannot just be jumped across (unless you're among the top long jumpers of the world), therefore you have only two possibilities: avoid it or build a bridge over it. Typically such bridges are built using aluminum ladders (cf. image below) that are placed across the crevasse and fixed on both sides. In the ideal case one also builds some ...


9

To answer your first question,"If the situation asks for it, should a mountaineer be donating blood at higher altitude?" I'm assuming you're referring to a life and death situation on the mountain where someone desperately needs an emergency transfusion to survive an accident, and whether or not it is safe to offer your blood. My answer would be yes, you ...


8

For winter walking a traditional straight-shafted mountaineering axe seems most appropriate. This would include products like the very common BD Raven or Raven Pro, and also those with a slight bend such as the Petzl Summit, Grivel Air Tech Evo, and BD Venom. As there are existing questions regarding length (How do I know what size ice axe I should get?), ...


8

I'll try and be brief but specific towards answering your question: What exactly happens to your body at high altitude? Disclaimer: A lot of data is from Wiki Pages and definitions from Human Anatomy and Physiology Books. Breathlessness and Hyperventilation: Does it start with one panting for breathe? Yes it does! We all know that Atmospheric pressure ...


8

To add to Ben Crowell's answer, some additional differences between mountaineering and rock-climbing harnesses include comfort while hiking, and weight. Compare the two harnesses below; the first is for alpinism/mountaineering, it's simple, light, and very minimal in size and bulk. A harness like this would be extremely comfortable to hike in, and wouldn't ...


8

I would use a dyneema rope as a lightweight hauling rope, rap line, or rescue rope, but I would never use any kind of static rope to catch a fall, this would include a fall into a crevasse, or a slip on a slope. With static ropes there is nearly zero energy absorption, I image this is even more true with dyneema. In the event of a fall during glacier ...


8

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


8

Essentially para cord is stronger, but its less resilient. Climbing ropes do not need to be strong - you die above about 10G (1000kg) force from internal injuries caused by your harness, a braking strain above this is pointless, even if the rope does not break in a fall that generates very high G forces, you die. Anchors have a force, which if exceeded ...


8

Climbing ropes are meant to hold falls, and to absorb the shock of the fall itself through stretching (they can stretch up to 30% of their length during a severe fall so to reduce the impact force on the climber). There's no need for a climbing rope to hold more than it does, because any more force during a fall and the body of the falling climber would be ...


7

I usually carry 10 single-length slings and 2 doubles, which means I have 24 carabiners just for the draws. That's a lot of biners, which is of course why most people will use all wiregates for this. That's not to say that it's impossible to do otherwise. I imagine that people climbing in the 1970s would have used nylon slings and non-wiregate oval biners, ...


7

I'll give this a shot, but I'm from the US, and although I've done a little bit of mountaineering in the Alps, I've never done Mont Blanc. Others may be able to give better answers. First, you need to buy an ice ax, crampons, and crampon-compatible boots. This is going to be expensive, and it is possible to rent gear in Chamonix, but IMO it's just not ...


7

For my answer I make the following two assumptions: You either have someone who can show you the techniques involved, you have access to some courses to teach it or you are a very serious self-taught person. In any case I will suggest tours to gain experience on your own after you learned the techniques (at least theoretically). I am based in Switzerland ...


6

Would have to agree. In the west we have been accused of being overly clean. after a few days you will likely reach some form of equilibrium with the mess. And while I don't recommend going more than a fortnight, its unlikely to be too much of a concern. Also it gives that first shower and shave after the trip an extra special "return to normal" feeling. ...


6

How would you do this safely (is this even possible to do safely)? This technique is based on one member of the party being more competent than the others and the grades being very low (probably nothing more than a Grade III scramble) For example I lead a group of friends up Tryfan. This is a grade I scramble. I took a rope. I was confident soloing any ...


6

A list of changes to the Munro list and database of Muroes and tops can be found here. The list is maintained by the Scottish Mountaineering club (SMC) and is published in the SMC journal. As far as I am aware an update is only published when there is a change to the list. This is normally because of new survey data putting a mountain above or below 3000’ ...


6

Although I had originally thought Wikipedia had a good list, nivag pointed me in the direction of walkhighlands, and the Munro Society pages have more info. 1884 - 236 1891 - 282 or 283 1921 - 276 1974 - 279 1981 - 1984 - 1990 - 1997 - 284 2009 - 283 2012 - 282


6

You asked about dosing. My recommendation is to get a professional to figure out the dosing. If you cannot get a professional, then do not carry this as you are potentially introducing as much risk as you are mitigating. When carrying a medication such as this for a possible emergency, there are several things I would recommend. Get a doctor to prescribe ...



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