Hot answers tagged

26

Hot soup mostly, it does depend on the individual diets of the climbers, not everybody eats the same thing, but most carry hot soup with them. Despite the massive amounts of energy needed to summit Everest, the truth is most climbers don't eat much on summit day, and that's simply because they don't have an appetite due to the high elevation. Many climbers ...


24

Isolation and prominence are the two key criteria to classify a peak as an independent mountain. To understand the meaning I like the visualization from the German Wiki where "Dominanz" means isolation and "Schartenhöhe" means prominence: Isolation is the distance to the next point with the same height (radius) of a higher mountain. So the nearest ...


15

This is a very complicated topic, and you can take an entire course where you learn and practice the techniques. Reading an answer on SE is not going to be enough. You need to practice. The following is just an outline. There is an entire chapter in Freedom of the Hills on glacier travel and crevasse rescue. The first step is always going to be to construct ...


14

imsodin's explanation (it's a heavy object you bury in the ground, like a dead body) seems very plausible. Just to add some history to it, here's the earliest use of the term listed in the Oxford English Dictionary: a1852 W. T. Spurdens Forby's Vocab. E. Anglia (1858) III. 12 Deadman, a piece of timber buried in the earth, to secure posts, or other ...


12

For a guided glacier tour: No reason - go ahead and use it. I would not worry about resharpening, as from your description there are no steep ice sections on the route. If there are and you like using your own hands, start filing. The quick option is to keep the geometry and just sharpen everything. The longer one is to reshape the tip so it looks more like ...


12

In 1996, they seemed to enjoy chocolate bars and candies. From some of the accounts of the infamous 1996 season related by the 2015 movie, apart for the classic soup, tea and fluids, we can consider "junk food" on summit day: Matt Dickinson (the other side of Everest) eats Muesli and pistachio nuts. Lou Kasischke (After the wind) was very fond of ...


12

You wouldn't want to use one to climb. My favourite quote I found on the Internet: Here's my advice on climbing with grappling hooks: don't climb with grappling hooks. Real climbers never use them, and for good reason. You have no idea what they hook onto, so you are trusting your life with something completely unknown. Those things are just for the ...


11

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


11

It has to go down to all the High-Altitude diets, and not just specific to Mt. Everest. Anywhere above 23,000 feet / 7,000 meters most of the mountaineers lose their appetite to a considerable level. So, at that altitude losing weight is a common observation. Thats where the fats come in picture. Body starts consuming these bodily fats and worst case muscles ...


11

If I was a guide and my choice would be Cordillera Blanca(Peru) or something similar. Its highest peak is technically an easy climb, very easy access to the range, good support infrastructure (transport etc) and major town very close by and very cost effective. Its a comfortable days bus trip from an international airport (Lima). It has stable, predictable ...


11

In climbing, there isn't a good use. However, in canyoneering a variant of the grappling hook is occasionally used to escape from potholes. It is called an octopus. You make one by attaching several aid climbing hooks like the BD talon to a potshot (a little cloth bag usually filled with sand). See this book for a picture. I have personally used them and I ...


11

Grappling hooks are sometimes used in the arborist (tree climbing) world. Rather than being thrown upwards, they are attached to a line in order to retrieve the other end of the line. Here is a picture of the relevant maneuver: https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturejournal/3391768573/in/album-72157616026109442/lightbox/ The hooks on the end are often curved ...


11

The DMM device you linked to is as far as I know the only product that has this name officially, but a dead man anchor is a general term for what is in mountaineering also called a t-slot anchor. In that case you simply dig a trench at right angle to the direction of pull, bury an object and attach a rope that holds the weight. I presume that as the DMM ...


10

Lemon juice and tinned fruit From Tenzing's autobiography Man of Everest We started pitching the highest camp that has ever been made. And it took us almost until it was dark. First we chopped away at the ice to try and make our sleeping-place a little more level. Then we struggled with frozen ropes and canvas, and tied the ropes around the ...


9

Essentially para cord is stronger, but its less resilient. Climbing ropes do not need to be strong - you die above about 10G (1000kg) force from internal injuries caused by your harness, a braking strain above this is pointless, even if the rope does not break in a fall that generates very high G forces, you die. Anchors have a force, which if exceeded ...


9

TLDR As long as you can walk normally (using the whole foot not just the toe area) always hold your axe at its head with the blade pointing backwards. More information This depends on the situation you are in. The text from Grivel seems to be a oversimplification. There is not just one technique for ascending and one for descending. There are two basic ...


9

This can be calculated using a property called cryoscopic constant Kf which links the concentration of a solved substance to the freezing point depression Td: Td = m * Kf where m is the molality which is the amount of mols of solved substance per kg of solvent (here water). For water Kf is 1.86K*kg/mol and the molar mass of sugar (sucrose) is 342g/mol. So ...


9

about excess rope, rope length and how to split rope please see: http://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7025/2653 As you see on the picture, the two ends of the rope is devided evenly between the first and the last rope team member. If you don't know this, I guess you don't know how to rescue someone in case of crevasse fall. You should really learn it by ...


8

Climbing ropes are meant to hold falls, and to absorb the shock of the fall itself through stretching (they can stretch up to 30% of their length during a severe fall so to reduce the impact force on the climber). There's no need for a climbing rope to hold more than it does, because any more force during a fall and the body of the falling climber would be ...


8

I would use a dyneema rope as a lightweight hauling rope, rap line, or rescue rope, but I would never use any kind of static rope to catch a fall, this would include a fall into a crevasse, or a slip on a slope. With static ropes there is nearly zero energy absorption, I image this is even more true with dyneema. In the event of a fall during glacier ...


8

I usually carry 10 single-length slings and 2 doubles, which means I have 24 carabiners just for the draws. That's a lot of biners, which is of course why most people will use all wiregates for this. That's not to say that it's impossible to do otherwise. I imagine that people climbing in the 1970s would have used nylon slings and non-wiregate oval biners, ...


8

Well, I'll share a list of peaks that are open and people do in India. Uttarakhand state: Panvali Dwaar (6663 m) - Song(RH) - Khati - Dwalio - Phukia - Base Camp - C - I,C - II and summit (Long: 79o57', Lat: 30o17') Nanda Khat (6545m) - Bharari(RH) - Loharkhet - Khati - Dwali(Vill) - Base Camp,C - I,C - II,C - III summit attempt (Long: 79o58', Lat: ...


7

These are emergency kit - specifically to help those suffering health problems due to altitude. As I understand it they are used within the climber's tent or bivouac, which provides the shelter required, and they provide an environment that matches a lower altitude, through pressurising the bag, allowing altitude sickness to be alleviated. So, looking at ...


7

I'll give this a shot, but I'm from the US, and although I've done a little bit of mountaineering in the Alps, I've never done Mont Blanc. Others may be able to give better answers. First, you need to buy an ice ax, crampons, and crampon-compatible boots. This is going to be expensive, and it is possible to rent gear in Chamonix, but IMO it's just not ...


7

The question has the tag "mountaineering," but most of the time when I hear people say that you need boots with ankle support, they're actually talking about trail-walking. The cases of hiking and mountaineering are qualitatively different. For mountaineering, one big reason people usually don't use lightweight running shoes is that often there is talus, ...


7

For my answer I make the following two assumptions: You either have someone who can show you the techniques involved, you have access to some courses to teach it or you are a very serious self-taught person. In any case I will suggest tours to gain experience on your own after you learned the techniques (at least theoretically). I am based in Switzerland ...


7

Prominence Is it's height above the surrounding ground (so the ground level is x height above sea level, the mounting is y height above sea level, it's Prominence = y -x) Isolation Is the distance between it and the nearest point at the same height. This is all based on the "footprint" on a map of a peak. This can be straight forward, or it can be very ...


7

I'm pretty sure grappling hooks were originally used in naval combat to allow for boarding other ships, but some googling found that some combat engineers use them to clear trip wires. Other than that I think they're mostly just useful for pulling on things you don't mind stabbing.


7

As already stated several times: If you know what you need to do on a glacier, you know what material to take. The other way round does not work: Just having the necessary gear will not insure proper crevasse rescue. So your first step is to take a course or find someone experienced to show you. This is the only recommended way to do it, but that is of ...


6

From a safety perspective, there's no reason why you couldn't use that axe. But if it was mine, I'd probably have it hung up on the wall as an heirloom, or in a display case with photos of my Dad carrying it. Stuff like that carries huge sentimental value. The only other reason I can think of why you wouldn't want to carry it, is because it's going to be a ...



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