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3

I would use a simple emergency bivy bag, a butt-pad (short sleeping pad) (termarest, exped), some extra socks, buff and then you can sleep in all your clothes on the pad in this bag. this should work for emergency, it's not the best comfort but it works in 3 season conditions. For more comfort you can use a light silk liner in your bivy bag. all this ...


4

Below is the bare minimum list of gear I would require anyone on my team to carry during and rescue operation. It does not include any of the numerous pieces of rope equipment that members of the rope team would cary in addition to the basic equipment ( only specific team members that have completed extensive training are qualified to be involved in any of ...


6

To be honest, the most important thing a Rescue Team needs to have is plenty of manpower (and womanpower!) with training and experience (speaking as a member of a UK Cave Rescue Team).


3

Depends on what you are going for. If you are heading this up, expect it to be a full-time endeavor for at least a year, and then part time for the lifetime of the hut. Like Nivag said, there are lots of different types of huts, so you have to decide on what you want before anything else. This will depend a lot on how much work you want to put into it, the ...


2

I think nivag covers most of this topic. I just wanted to add some of my experiences. Mountain huts/bothy's cover a very wide range of facilities. Here are two I've actually stayed in to demonstrate this, This one: in north wales consists of four walls, a roof and fire pit, that's it. It's big enough for about 2 people to lie flat. One other hut I stayed ...


9

My experience of mountain huts huts is mainly from UK and Europe. Standards in other parts of the world may vary. Mountain huts come in a wide range of different varieties. At the basic end you have unmanned huts or bothies. These can range from very basic with just a roof and wooden bunks to put your sleeping kit on to reasonably nice with beds, stove, ...


2

if you are still interested in doing the walk up from the sea-level, don't hesitate. It is a fabulous walk and easy. Just take the traditional 'Camino de Chasna' described here http://www.canariascnnews.com/index.php/especiales/travel/item/453-el-camino-de-chasna-la-hist%C3%B3rica-ruta-de-humboldt. It takes you from Puerto de la Cruz to the high plain of Las ...


4

Welcome to outdoors.SE! Most of us have probably flown in airplanes on altitudes greater than that in pressurized passenger airplanes and didn't feel any fatigue at all. I think you gave a partial answer to your own question here. The plane is pressurized. The cabin pressure in a passenger jet is only equivalent to about 2400 m of altitude. ...


3

First of all I have to admit that the following is mostly not based on knowledge but more or less on educated guessing, so take it with a grain of salt. Alpine tours Let's first consider hiring a guide in the Alps (maximum height below 5000m). Here the answer, if you will be asked for a tour book should be in nearly all cases "No". Here we can just divide ...


3

No one uses them as absolute evidence, as you could always fake them, but they can really help a tour guide get a feel for your level of experience and to understand which situations you felt comfortable with and which caused you problems. They also help you remember how a particular tour went, as afterwards you may not remember in detail.


5

Is it possible to compare stats from this to what is required to be able to do this hike? VO2 max is the best indicator of fitness. Running will increase your VO2 max. VO2 max is the amount of Oxygen your blood can hold per Kg per minute. This is an important factor in all endurance exercise, especially exercise at altitude. The higher your VO2 max ...


5

I don't think it is difficult to give an exact correlation between running time and hiking endurance. I think this is impossible. I will give you an example from myself: I am not a good runner because my lungs aren't the best. Nonetheless I can hike quite a lot and had no problems at 12.500 ft. Also 6000 ft a single day up/down were possible. Still I am ...


2

I think it is difficult to give an exact correlation between running time and hiking endurance, but distance running as a fitness regimen is excellent training. It sounds like you have a pretty good idea of what you are in for so I would advise that if you run a couple days during the week and hike when you can, you should do fine. If you can get an extra ...



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