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3

Firstly, the technique you describe is actually called "Moving together" at least by British climbers. The technique is used to move rapidly on relatively easy ground while also providing a degree of protection from falls. It is also used to rope up while crossing glaciers. This website has a good set of photos showing how to attach the rope to your harness ...


4

The insoles typically are the first thing that gets worn out. Insoles will eventually flatten from the weight of your body. this will then put downward pressure on your arches. Insoles get flattened from use and no longer hold your heel in the correct place. I've had tough and irritating times when my insoles got so flat that, in wet conditions, they would ...


1

Imsodin's answer is good and covers a lot of good points. One thing that is relevant here is Alpine boots come in 3 grades (to match the grades of crampons). You need to pick the right boot grade for the job you want it to do. Some trade off comfort (when walking) for ability when climbing. B1 B1 one boots are softer and allow the most comfort when ...


7

I am not entirely sure, but I think you are referring to boots like the La Sportiva Nepal. In this case, while these shoes are as you mentioned designed primarerly for technical mountaineering, you should not expect these sort of problems. I did my military service mostly in these boots and we did a lot of marching on flat concrete. While this is a shameful ...


1

I'd like to make an addition to the answer of @RoryAlsop. Namely the case where only ONE end of the rope is used. Next to descending on both rope-ends at the same time, it's also possible to do it only on one end. This is for example done if you have very technical rappels where you need to use extra gear or lock yourself into the rope (in that case ...


5

Iztaccihuatl would use about the same skills as Aconcagua, but is lower altitude and can be done in a day, rather than the 2 weeks usually required for Aconcagua. I acclimatized by spending several days hiking on La Malinche. If you're interested in Aconcagua and don't have a lot of high-altitude/snow experience, you might want to do Izta as a warmup. Point ...


3

The answers given already address almost all the issues well, but I'd like to add one final point which hasn't been given enough focus; ease of descent in case something goes wrong. If the OP's sister arrives, makes it up, and comes down before the AMS symptoms begin, that's great. But if something goes wrong and she's stuck at 4000+ meters, she is in some ...


4

The other answers already gave lots of information about altitude adaption, so I will focus on one certain point: AMS (acute mountain sickness) evolves when staying at high altitudes. It is a pathologic disease with potential severe consequences. This should not be mixed up with the immediate influences of high altitude on the body like decrease of physical ...


1

First I want to make clear, that I do not have professional medical training. Everything I am going to write down, I acquired by reading articles published by various high-altitude medicine societies. As the question is pretty broad, this answer will certainly not cover all involved aspects, but I will do my best to give some information. While Aspirin is ...



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