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6

Climbing ropes are meant to hold falls, and to absorb the shock of the fall itself through stretching (they can stretch up to 30% of their length during a severe fall so to reduce the impact force on the climber). There's no need for a climbing rope to hold more than it does, because any more force during a fall and the body of the falling climber would be ...


6

Essentially para cord is stronger, but its less resilient. Climbing ropes do not need to be strong - you die above about 10G (1000kg) force from internal injuries caused by your harness, a braking strain above this is pointless, even if the rope does not break in a fall that generates very high G forces, you die. Anchors have a force, which if exceeded ...


1

A climbing rope, as in sport-climbing, is also known as a dynamic rope - it stretches when you fall. If you use polypropylene strips and fall 5 metres, even if they are strong enough not to break, the same force acts on your body as if you fell 5 metres onto solid ground. If this weren't a problem, climbers would all be using steel cable which is stronger ...


4

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


2

In an alpine environment there are many ways more likely that pro could fail than the gate opening - it not like sport or gym climbing where the anchor can be trusted, therefore, its wise to presume no individual anchor will hold, so if a gate did open and release the rope, the rest of the system will keep you safe. Carrying extra screw gates 'just in case' ...


2

First of all, there's no such thing being too safe, do whatever you feel makes you more secure as long as you can do it safely. As long as you place all of your pro properly, then you're unlikely to need to use lockers as intermediate protection between belays, but, all single gate, non-locking carabiners are susceptible to failing if back clipped, or ...


5

I usually carry 10 single-length slings and 2 doubles, which means I have 24 carabiners just for the draws. That's a lot of biners, which is of course why most people will use all wiregates for this. That's not to say that it's impossible to do otherwise. I imagine that people climbing in the 1970s would have used nylon slings and non-wiregate oval biners, ...


-1

While experience from winter hiking and climbing (its more high altitude trekking) Kilimanjaro will be of use in the approach and for having some idea of how you react to high altitude it is still not at all sufficient for climbing this peaks. According to internet sources there are glaciers, seracs, zones with rockfall and a steep of ~45deg. This is a ...



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