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I am by no means an authority on lightning in any way. With that said, however, I have had my share of getting caught climbing in a thunderstorm, and have since tried to do some reading on the subject. The biggest hurdle to surmount here is that most lightning safety advice revolves around seeking shelter, which is often not a viable option midway up a ...


2

It's risk management. The best way to handle a storm is to get down before it starts. Check the weather and be down by noon or whenever the weather normally gets genned up. If you're in a thunderstorm and you're very high, it is probably more dangerous to rush a technical descent than to wait out the storm or continue climbing (up or down) normally. Don't ...


2

Just girth hitch a double length sling around your belay loop and clip a biner to the haul loop of your pack. Hang it between your legs while you chimney, shimmy or otherwise do whatchu gotta do. When you're out of the business, pull it up and put it back on your back. No extra gear, minimal time and fuss, little chance of it getting stuck because you can ...


2

Here's a detailed article on hauling called Hauling 101. Summary: Use a pulley Back up your pulley Use a safety line or tie yourself in independently Attach a 40 foot piece of static line (7 mm is a good diameter) permanently to the haul bag, to be used as a leash. This will help with lowering a lot.


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Definiely do not attempt to keep them separate on the route. Uncoil and stack them separately at the start, but thereafter handle them as one. Make sure that leader and second both tie the same rope on the same side so that they are not crossed over. I've never used a rope basket, but it doesn't seem like a bad idea if you don't mind the weight. Otherwise ...


1

From this site: The Rope Basket This system works well on stances where you are standing comfortably on a ledge, but you don't have enough space to flake the rope. It is also much easier if you are swinging leads. Your personal anchor system or tie-in is connected to your anchor, making a straight line to the rock. As your second climbs upward, you will ...



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