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32

The old advice is to "Take nothing but pictures, and leave nothing but footprints". Almost any amount of memento-taking is going to lead to some kind of impact in anything but the most isolated of areas. The details of what is and isn't legal are going to vary with the exact area you're in -in the US, Wilderness Areas, a national forests, Bureau of Land ...


20

Generally speaking in the US, you can collect as much as you want from the gift shops. Otherwise, everything else is strictly forbidden.


8

I have phoned with the trail reservation office for Jasper National Park, and this is what they told me. The route has been decommisioned. This means that it is now considered wildland. Hiking and camping are permitted but require significantly more skills (and some more equipment) than hiking on a well-maintained "semi-primitive" trail. A backcountry ...


8

The answer is no, you may only camp in designated areas. Camping is only allowed in designated areas at Jasper park. If you contact the park directly by e-mail the answer is the following: In Jasper National Park, when hikers are hiking on trails they must camp in the designated backcountry campsites only. From the official Parks Canada Backcountry ...


7

Generally in a national part, national monument, or official wilderness area in the US, don't take anything. These areas are managed with preservation being a high or the highest goal. We simply can't have every human on earth take even a small rock. All parts of the environment are connected. No matter how harmless or inconsequential you think some item ...


6

I think your going to struggle. Let me explain why: Scotland has a very different climate to the US. Scotland is a northern region warmed by the Gulf Stream. At the same latitude in the Americas the temperature is much much colder, think polar bears and ice flows. Those green hills are the product of lot's and lot's of rain, shortish daylight hours, thin ...


6

I have a lot of experience with the federal lands, and the rules are pretty much the same between agencies, whether the Bureau of Land Management or the National Park Service or the US Forest Service. The rule is: don't remove anything. There are some serious consequences, even a felony in some cases. You can't take rocks or even pine cones. Or flowers. ...


6

One of my favorite things to collect from National Parks is a stamp for my park passport. There are cancellation stamps in many national parks and sets of full-color stamps you can buy at the gift shop. And please take the other answers to heart. Millions of us enjoy the parks system every year.


4

You're looking for balds. They are quite common in the southern Appalachians. The Roan Highlands along the border of Tennessee and North Carolina are particularly beautiful.


4

As of today, several states have committed funding to open federal lands (mostly national parks) temporarily in their states. Utah has opened all of its national parks and some monuments operated by the NPS. Also, New York has paid to operate the Statue of Liberty park, Arizona has funded Grand Canyon National Park, and South Dakota is opening Mt. ...


4

Essentially, any places which has Federal staff will be shutdown and unaccessible including those which has a booth or paid access. Non-regulated public lands are not affected by the government shutdown. National parks are closed, including Yosemite. National Forests are still 'open' and so are state and county parks. Services are closed and people with ...


4

I live in Banff National Park and go backcountry camping on a regular basis. Peak season for Banff, Kootenay, Jasper, Glacier, Yoho, and Revelstoke (and really, pretty much any Canadian National Park) are July and August. That said, it's also usually the best time to camp, as the weather is mild, the trails are at their best, and there is less chance of ...


4

Legally the answer is "nothing" in the National Parks of Canada. I think the US is similar. Ethically the best touchstone is the Kantian ethic: What would be the result of everyone doing this? As part of that, examine the renewal time, and the numbers of the thing in question and the number of visitors. E.g. Taking the pine cone unless the pine is ...


3

In northern California, after a rainy winter, much of the coast ranges are green and grassy, especially as you get further from the Pacific. But timing is very important. In the same region, Pt. Reyes Nat. Seashore looks similar and stays greener, although it's not a very big area.


3

What you are specifically asking for is quite rare. That is because any place wet enough to have the kind of grass you want will have trees. There are vast grassy areas in the center of North America, but they are grassy because they are too dry for trees. They don't look so lush and green except perhaps a few weeks of the year. If they were so lush all ...


2

You can find grassy mountains in Colorado in the Guanella Pass, but you may find that the air is a bit thinner up there than it is in Scotland: Guanella Pass Another place you'll find mountains very similar to the the Scottish mountains is in Newfoundland Canada: Grand Codroy Valley


2

In Rock Hound State Park near Deming, Luna County, South-Western New Mexico, USA, you are allowed to collect rocks. This is highly unusual. I read it in various sources. The state park website seems very limited, but from the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources: It was established in 1966 as the first park in the United States that ...


2

It's always okay to take away trash! I'm not just being tongue in cheek here. Many US National Parks (and other protected areas) have more latitude for beach-combing; manmade items like sea-glass may be considered trash / non-natural additions and be fair game to remove. Again, you'll want to note the specific regulations for the Park you're in; and of ...


1

Provincial park statistics: Qu├ębec Ontario British Columbia Nova Scotia Alberta Saskatchewan


1

You may collect rocks or even use a metal detector in national forests, which have different rules than national parks. It would have been helpful if people had answered with actual legal facts rather than what they think or believe should be right, but then again, you did ask about national parks, not national forests.



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