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8

I have phoned with the trail reservation office for Jasper National Park, and this is what they told me. The route has been decommisioned. This means that it is now considered wildland. Hiking and camping are permitted but require significantly more skills (and some more equipment) than hiking on a well-maintained "semi-primitive" trail. A backcountry ...


8

In my experience, most of the trailheads in the Boulder, RMNP area are accessible to little cars almost the whole time they are open. I'm not saying all are, but most. That said, you could easily go three ways with the choice of vehicle: AWD, little clearance -- Something like a Subaru will get you to almost all the trailheads that are open almost all the ...


7

There are many trails and therefore many trailheads with a variety of road types leading to them. Most of the roads in Rocky Mountain National Park can be traveled by ordinary passenger cars, at least when it's not snowy. The roads in the nearby national forests vary widely. The main forest roads can be traveled by ordinary passenger car, but a more ...


6

I think your going to struggle. Let me explain why: Scotland has a very different climate to the US. Scotland is a northern region warmed by the Gulf Stream. At the same latitude in the Americas the temperature is much much colder, think polar bears and ice flows. Those green hills are the product of lot's and lot's of rain, shortish daylight hours, thin ...


4

I live in Banff National Park and go backcountry camping on a regular basis. Peak season for Banff, Kootenay, Jasper, Glacier, Yoho, and Revelstoke (and really, pretty much any Canadian National Park) are July and August. That said, it's also usually the best time to camp, as the weather is mild, the trails are at their best, and there is less chance of ...


4

You're looking for balds. They are quite common in the southern Appalachians. The Roan Highlands along the border of Tennessee and North Carolina are particularly beautiful.


3

What you are specifically asking for is quite rare. That is because any place wet enough to have the kind of grass you want will have trees. There are vast grassy areas in the center of North America, but they are grassy because they are too dry for trees. They don't look so lush and green except perhaps a few weeks of the year. If they were so lush all ...


3

In northern California, after a rainy winter, much of the coast ranges are green and grassy, especially as you get further from the Pacific. But timing is very important. In the same region, Pt. Reyes Nat. Seashore looks similar and stays greener, although it's not a very big area.


2

You can find grassy mountains in Colorado in the Guanella Pass, but you may find that the air is a bit thinner up there than it is in Scotland: Guanella Pass Another place you'll find mountains very similar to the the Scottish mountains is in Newfoundland Canada: Grand Codroy Valley


2

In Rock Hound State Park near Deming, Luna County, South-Western New Mexico, USA, you are allowed to collect rocks. This is highly unusual. I read it in various sources. The state park website seems very limited, but from the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources: It was established in 1966 as the first park in the United States that ...


1

If you're hiking in and around Boulder, you don't need anything special for a car. If you live near a bus route, there are routes that can take you to the edge of the city and within 15 minutes easy walk of the trailheads at Boulder Chautauqua , which are all great day hikes on their own. Off the top of my head and experience (I live in Boulder), You won't ...


1

Provincial park statistics: Québec Ontario British Columbia Nova Scotia Alberta Saskatchewan



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