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You need to know if you are in Northern Hemisphere or in Southern Hemisphere or nearby the Equator. If you are in Northern Hemisphere: First locate the Polaris. Its the last star in The Ursa Minor. I've had trouble in location it sometimes. If you are in such a situation, try locating The Ursa Major. The Ursa Major is located just to the north of The ...


9

The simplest way (assuming you are in the Northern hemisphere) is to first find the Great Bear / Ursa Major / the Big Dipper / The Plough, and use the two end stars as a sight line. The star in Ursa Minor that they point to is Polaris, which is currently our Pole Star. This does change, but not noticeably in our lifetimes. (from ...


7

Adding this mainly because it's a different kind of approach. The other ones are usually more practical, but this is an alternative that does not require remembering any constellations. If you have a rough idea and a camera, you can take a long exposure (30s minimum, more is better) and check which star in photo is the only one that does not move / stays a ...


5

Here's the theory: at noon, if you're in the northern hemisphere, the sun is due south of you. At 6am it's due east of you and at 6pm, due west. (Day length may tweak this a little if you're far enough north, but this is not a precise technique, it just needs to beat looking for which side of the tree is mossy etc. That said, you should un-daylight-savings ...


1

There is another way that was taught to me in the Boy Scouts. You need a watch with traditional hour and minute hands, make sure it is showing the accurate time Take a small stick, like a toothpick, and stand it up vertically in the center of the watch. Make the shadow of the stick fall on the current HOUR hand When the shadow is on hour hand, then the ...



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