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18

You need to know if you are in Northern Hemisphere or in Southern Hemisphere or nearby the Equator. If you are in Northern Hemisphere: First locate the Polaris. Its the last star in The Ursa Minor. I've had trouble in locating it sometimes. Many people do. So, if you are in such a situation, try locating The Ursa Major. The Ursa Major is located just to ...


13

I'd give them whatever my device or map provided me, and let them convert to whatever their devices or maps use. Anyone used to receiving lat/lon coordinates regularly should be able to convert from various formats to whatever they use internally. You're the one in trouble with limited resources. You're out there with a broken leg, lost, in the cold or ...


12

The simplest way (assuming you are in the Northern hemisphere) is to first find the Great Bear / Ursa Major / the Big Dipper / The Plough, and use the two end stars as a sight line. The star in Ursa Minor that they point to is Polaris, which is currently our Pole Star. This does change, but not noticeably in our lifetimes. (from ...


10

Yep! If you store your compass near objects that have strong magnets in them (such as your car speakers) it can demagnetize over extended periods of time. There are a few other issues your compass can run into that makes it less reliable as well. Air getting into the compass housing (in excess) Bubbles can form within the compass housing when doing big ...


10

Adding this mainly because it's a different kind of approach. The other ones are usually more practical, but this is an alternative that does not require remembering any constellations. If you have a rough idea and a camera, you can take a long exposure (30s minimum, more is better) and check which star in photo is the only one that does not move / stays a ...


7

I would recommend UTM coordinates; it avoids the formatting uncertainty of lat/long and is better suited for ground operations. (Easy to translate to paper maps, define search areas, and calculate distances.) If you use the WGS84 datum, the numerical portions are also identical with the military grid reference system (MGRS) and the national grid (USNG). ...


7

Source: John Baldwin: Slope Angles from Map Contours View this page for a refresher on how to do the maths to calculate slope on a topographic map.


5

It depends a lot on the terrain. I wear a pedometer throughout the week (health program for work), and I use a GPS when hiking. From experience - on level terrain - I know that I get between 2100 and 2200 steps per mile. I walk between work and the coffee shop (a round trip of about 1.25 miles) each day, and this is fairly consistent. If you calibrate ...


5

Here's the theory: at noon, if you're in the northern hemisphere, the sun is due south of you. At 6am it's due east of you and at 6pm, due west. (Day length may tweak this a little if you're far enough north, but this is not a precise technique, it just needs to beat looking for which side of the tree is mossy etc. That said, you should un-daylight-savings ...


4

On mobile devices, the Gaia GPS app allows creating a waypoint using whichever format is currently selected (which includes UTM). From your computer, you can enter UTM coordinates into CalTopo; this is convenient if you are printing out paper maps. (It also has some ability to annotate maps and save them to KMZ/KML files for use with Google Earth or your ...


4

There are many devices that will let you enter in UTM and LatLong coordinates interchangeably. be sure to bring a waterproof map with you too though. http://www.rei.com/product/869473/garmin-gpsmap-64-gps http://www.magellangps.com/Store/eXploristSeries/eXplorist-510


2

There is another way that was taught to me in the Boy Scouts. You need a watch with traditional hour and minute hands, make sure it is showing the accurate time Take a small stick, like a toothpick, and stand it up vertically in the center of the watch. Make the shadow of the stick fall on the current HOUR hand When the shadow is on hour hand, then the ...


2

Always have a water proof map of the area you're traveling in ( one with coordinates on each side if you can help it ), and a compass you can use to triangulate your position with. You'll be better prepared in an emergency and more confident outdoors in general if you practice triangulating your position until it comes naturally: ...


1

Pedometers seem to be calibrated for use on flat ground. Rough or difficult terrain can cause you to take more steps and it is this mechanism which pedometers use to determine their output. If you have a known pace length and can compensate for it using some measure for it to be diminished when walking a route that isnt flat then id say it could be mildly ...



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