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13

It looks like a Burl. They are natural non-harmful (think of them like scar tissue maybe, resulting from injury or infection) deformities in the grain of trees. Both hardwood & softwood trees can develop burls. (FWIW, I'd guess based on the bark & needles laying in the folds of the bark in the first picture that this tree is some sort of conifer.)


8

Private camping is both allowed and nice on Masonboro Island which is North of Carolina Beach, NC and south of Wrightsville Beach, NC. You are close to civilization but the island is only reachable by boat which cuts down on the population - especially on weekdays and during off season. I don't know if you consider this Mid-Atlantic since it would be quite a ...


6

You may like the look, but those trees are in the process of being killed by a nasty invasive, Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). It is one of the more common invasives in MA. There have been many things writting about this invasive. It's been on any list of invasive plants in MA that I've seen. Do a search and you'll see. DCR (MA Department ...


4

My suggestion would be to create a path in Google Earth and then view the elevation profile of the path. Here is an example of what that would look like, One caveat, Google Earth underestimates the steepness because instead of calculating slope as rise/run it uses rise/hypotenuse.


4

I was pleased to see the photos of the burls; it's been some time since I had thought of all of the splendid uses Native Americans and others had found for burls, so I hope no-one minds my digression. Burls are caused by wounds to trees, as has been mentioned. But far from making the tree unattractive, burls had been valued! They had been sought out by ...


4

Great Blue Herons don't seem to be territorial. Nesting sites usually have a few to a dozen nests at a time, sometimes three in the same tree. This is so common they are referred to as heron "rookeries". Except at the nest, it does appear that these birds work alone. Sometimes you can see two nearby, but not usually next to each other. Most of the time ...


4

This is my answer to your question, I am new here but I really enjoy this type of thing. In 2011, we had a very bad tornado come through our property. After that I have heard 4-5 new bird calls, which I have never before around here (Tennessee), and 2 at night. If you think back to when you first heard this bird, had there been any bad storms where you live? ...


3

Have you looked into Assateague? It's just south of Ocean City, Maryland.


3

There are quite a number of options, although the 4000 foot requirement pretty much limits it to the White Mountains of NH, the northern Green Mountains of VT, and a few peaks in ME. It's not clear if you want to or need to do a out and back, or if you can spot a car and do a traverse. Here are just a few options that come to mind without looking things up ...


1

One possible route to see waterfalls in White Mountain National Forest: Hike in from the end of Zealand Road to Zealand Falls, then take the Ethan Pond Trail down to Thoreau Falls. Hike out the Ethan Pond Trail and you can get picked up by the AMC shuttle. http://www.outdoors.org/lodging/lodging-shuttle.cfm The drive back would take you through Crawford ...



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