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4

In average to less than average physical shape, I'd say that is pushing it a bit. There is a serious incline followed by a steep decline, which are going to slow you down. It's going to make for a very long day. If everything goes well 10 to 11 hours, if you don't stop for breaks or lunch. If you are in less than average health then you will probably ...


4

Omnimap seem to have all 1:50k maps with a delivery time of around two weeks. However, Omnimap are quite expensive (US$ 16.95 per sheet). By comparison, MapWorld New Zealand charges NZ$ 7.90 (US$ 6.50) per map. Land Information New Zealand have a (probably incomplete) list of international resellers. This list includes Omnimap. Probably some of the domestic ...


4

Generally, places where it is forbidden there is good signage, or it is a place where it is not surprising to be forbidden. Generally, it seemed that random stretches of highway would be posted, but just a mile or two down the road would be a spectacular place to pull over and hang out. Additionally, many parks have areas in which camping is prohibited or ...


3

Can you do some local training hikes on similar terrain before heading out there? That will give you a good idea of what your capabilities are. Even if you don't have similar terrain, you could creatively use what you have. In other words, I have a local park with 250-foot hill climbs. If I know my target hike will have a couple 1000-foot climbs, I could ...


3

I'm a kiwi too (a director of Hiking New Zealand.com) We do remote guided small group trips around NZ . Some of us are starting to play around with digital map solutions. A Good one I found is BackCountryNavigator PRO, cost a few bucks but is excellent. can download maps for when you are out of Internet range and your GPS works on it. Don't use Google maps ...


3

I am from New Zealand and I tend to agree with the topomap service. Another great resource is the Department of Conservation Website http://www.doc.govt.nz Happy Hiking


3

I am a big fan of the low ankle water resistant Salomon fell-running shoes. The Gore-Tex allows moisture and sweat to escape rapidly, and when worn with wicking socks they actually work well to keep your feet dry and sweat-free. I do most of my hiking in Scotland, which is on a par with New Zealand for precipitation - I would definitely recommend water ...


2

I avoid water-resistant shoes for hiking since they trap moisture (your sweat) in as well as out. Kinda depends on hiking style, too - if you're ultralighting then you'd probably want trail-running shoes that breath and dry quickly as you walk. See Ray J.'s advice. They're light enough that people often carry a second pair. Another factor is weather - a ...


2

Think about whether it really matters if your feet stay dry. Will this be in warm enough weather when trenchfoot and frostbite are not problems? If so, the simplest answer may be to let the feet get wet. Wet or damp feet by themselves is not really a problem. I do most of my hiking in New England where it can rain any time on short notice, and soggy ...


1

When hiking for multiple days you will likely encounter scenarios that you will get wet feet regardless of the footwear you are using. My experience with Goretex footwear is the same as most fellow hikers I know: Goretex footwear can delay your feet getting wet but it cannot prevent it altogether. The important question is: What is your strategy once your ...


1

NZ Topo Map - www.topomap.co.nz is a great resource. You can highlight the area of map you're interested in and print it out in high quality to take with you. If you have a Windows Phone then you can download the NZ Topo Map app and take sections offline with you. Or if you have an Android phone, New Zealand Topo Maps Pro by Atlogis is a great app for ...


1

Quick tips: Go to http://www.i-needtoknow.com/milford/maps/index.html They have several links for hikers, including maps. One you might check out is the Department of Conservation's online maps at: http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/ Also, Google says there's another site called www.kiwifootpaths.com that may be useful...



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