Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

I've used both kinds of packs. External frame packs are generally cheaper, can carry more gear, and allow much better ventilation to your back. In addition to the main compartment and side pockets, most external frame packs also have an area above and below the main compartment where gear can be lashed. Internal frame packs tend to have larger interior ...


8

There really isn't much reason to use an external frame backpack, especially if you're looking at modern backpacks. In almost every case, the internal frame is going to be the better option. Internal frame backpacks have a lot of advantages over external frames, they have a smaller profile, and when properly packed keep weight closer to your center of ...


7

To add to some of the answers already posted: External: The biggest advantage is how forgiving an external frame pack is. Since the load is hanging on a frame, you can get away with more casual disregard for how you pack the pack, and don't have to worry about the edge of that pot digging in to your shoulder-blades. It can also take a much heavier load more ...


6

The garbage bags are soft and flexible, so they'll fit around stuff a lot easier than a rucksack. As well as being stiffer a rucksack will be divided into different compartments. The volume will include the side pockets and the lid space. Something like the sleeping bag will take up a large space and then other stuff will have to fit around it. Things may ...


5

You can get a rough estimate from using an online calorie estimation website. Make sure to use one that accepts weight as a variable, and add your pack weight to your body weight. I am a large guy, and would burn over 4000 calories a day hiking for 6 hours with a pack. Most calculations aren't going to take specifics like change in elevation, or temperature. ...


4

I think the regulations are so strict because the park service wants to keep a level of discipline about how hikers manage their food, so that none is accidentally left in a pack, and the oils and crumbs from food don't contaminate a pack. This avoids scenarios where food was left in a pack unintentionally. Bears don't hunt humans except in rare cases ...


4

Bear populations, bear problems, and aggressive bears are distributed extremely unevenly in California wilderness areas. There are dense populations of problem animals in a few small areas such as Yosemite Valley and Little Yosemite. These are areas with a lot of humans packed into a small space. You're going to the White Mountains, which gets very few human ...


4

According to Yosemite Park's website, bears have lost fear towards humans and will try to get food from whatever is the easiest way. This usually means that it's easier to break a car's window of wreck a campsite than going hunting. They have a keen sense of smell and will follow not just food, but products with various scents that we wouldn't think of as ...


4

One possible advantage not yet mentioned for external frame pack is that most are adjustable to fit a wide range of people. This is useful if you know that the pack is going to be used by several people of different sizes, or if the person is likely to be growing rapidly. For example my son who was 14 and 4'11" when the pack was purchased then 16 and 6'1" ...


3

There is no simple algorithm to calculate calory needs. It depends on many conditions, such as the intensity of the trek, the temperature and humidity, your metabolism, what you are wearing etc. My typical calory usage (70kg weight) in mountains measured in Crna Gora in August, route between 20 and 30 GOTs (1 GOT is 1 km distance or 100 m elevation) was ...


3

Trying to stuff your gear into a plastic bag will only give you a lower bound on the pack size. As with many parameters, the backpack size in litres is more to compare different models, not to be taken as an absolute value. Also, different manufacturers tend to use different litres :) A 60–65 litre backpack with an adjustable top is a reasonable first ...


1

While I agree with the above comments, one thing worth noting is that, like all "luggage", there is a certain element of "stuffability" possible in a backpack, which would not be possible in a bin liner, at least not easily. You can really jam all the softer things into a backpack (like clothes, sleeping bag and liner, etc), and then cinch it tight ...


1

As a Boy Scout, I prefer the external frame backpack. The internal is more comfortable, but on long hikes, the external is not only practical for more gear, but vents your back so it's not dripping with sweat. I am not as knowledgeable as some on this page, but my strong preference is the external.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible