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18

Here in Slovenia, the use of wild garlic is quite widespread. Although the whole plant, including bulbs, is edible, leaves are most commonly used. I tried only leaves so far, so I can share my experience with only them. Gathering Young, light-green leaves are a bit more aromatic, but smaller; older are darker and larger. I pick a mix of both and look for ...


14

Nettles should be blanched to destroy the formic acid before eating (Handle with gloves of course). Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil & prepare a bowl of ice water on the side. Once the water is boiling, plunge the nettles in the water for no more than a minute or so (the nettles should be bright green & not over cooked). Quickly drain ...


12

I have only had them as a tea with raspberry leaves. Refreshing enough, but nothing I'd actively forage to accomplish. However since the USDA report (direct PDF download) says that stinging nettles are 2.7% protein, and high in a number of vitamins and minerals, I think I'll try using them in a few dishes. Initial collection and preparation for cooking ...


10

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


8

The leaves of the Striped Maple ("Moose Maple") are a no-contest winner, at least in the forests of the northeastern US. The leaves are large, and softer than some forms of toilet paper. As for availability: Anecdotally, I tend to see this plant in most deciduous forests of New Hampshire. It tends to grow bush-like near the ground, at least while it's ...


7

Poisonous plants are typically more dangerous when you burn them, at least that's true with plants that have oily toxins (poison ivy/oak). Toxins in plants aren't necessarily vaporized when burned. Smoke is a particulate, not a vapour. If you are burning something toxic, the toxins can potentially be carried by particles of smoke and be inhaled which is far ...


7

This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...


7

Dock leaves are good: They're big, durable, plentiful, and (most importantly) non-stinging. A little rough, maybe, but what do you expect from a leaf... ? Remember, try to leave no trace.


6

Very carefully!! Seriously need to be blanched/boiled to render the Formic acid inert. Formic has a much higher effect on organics than its relative acidity would suggest. From here use like cabbage or such.


6

Plantago works excellent againt nettle because of its anti-histamin properties and, in my experience, also against musquito bites. It grows usually in the neighbourhoud of nettle and might be the only plants that survices on a pathway: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago --> uses You need to crush the leaves and apply it on the 'wound'. (it's like ...


6

I'll start with a local favorite: great mullein or common mullein (Verbascum thapsus) Introduced to the North America. I've found it from New York to North Carolina. Apparently originated in Europe and Asia, I think. The leaves are large, moderately durable, thick, but soft and fuzzy. Their usefulness is somewhat limited by the fact that they tend to be ...


6

At least for some species, Rhododendron wood is not especially toxic when burned. I've seen (and used) many species of Rhododendron in the Chinese Himalaya as firewood, in both outdoor and drafty indoor conditions. This included seasoned and unseasoned wood, and large enough quantities of smoke that my Rite-in-The-Rain notebooks still smell like bacon. ...


5

Over the counter antihistamine products - especially tablets (due to light weight and effectiveness), but also topical creams such as stop itch and antihistamines are the most effective solution. These should be carried in your first aid kit if you have a history of allergy problems. Even for those that normally don't have problems, the size and weight of ...


5

The only thing I can recommend from experience is mud: Cover the itching area with plenty of it and the itching will go away. After the mud dried out and has fallen off, sometimes the bites start to itch again, just reapply. But in most cases I never had to do that again. Generally cold helps by dulling the itching. The opposite, heat, will temporarily ...


5

Poison oak's "poison" is an oil-based substance; therefore any oil-removing soap will do the trick. Dish soap is a low-cost and easily available substance for cleaning poison oak from skin. This study found that: Dish soap was significantly better than no treatment. Dish soap was not significantly different from two other products (Tecnu, which is much ...


5

Thimbleberry leaves are my favourite (Rubus spectabilis), They're all over the place in the Kootenays in British Columbia (Southern Canadian Rockies). They're soft and they're about the size of your hand or bigger. The berries are very tasty too, so you you can have a peachy-fuzz-tart-raspberry snack while you do your business.


3

This is a good place to start: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/mar/30/nettle-recipes-hugh-fearnley-whittingstall Nettle Soup Adapted from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall Around 150g nettle tops 30-35g knob of butter 1 onion, peeled chopped 1 large or 2 smallish leeks, trimmed, washed and finely sliced 2 celery sticks, chopped ...


3

In Russia we make a soup with nettles. It's very very tasty! I have no receipts from myself, but I have some links on Russian receipt forum, maybe it will be useful.


3

My mother makes gnocchi with nettles. You can make them both with or without potatoes. Another nice recipe is meat/pork joint wrapped in nettle and bread. This one may be quite unpractical to prepare outdoor though as you need to bake it.


3

As noted, the key is removing it quickly. If you like to carry around dishsoap, that will work great. However if you do not regularly carry that around, abrasives are a good alternative. I've effectively used the sand at the bottom of a small waterfall to remove the oils and of the entire hiking group, all of whom realized too late what we'd walked ...


3

Wikipedia is basically right – you can safely eat it (according to the German Wikipedia article the whole plant, however, the leaves are the most used part) and here in Germany they sometimes even sell the leaves in the supermarket. The typical use I know of is the one that is given in the cited Wikipedia text you gave, i.e. adding the leaves to a salad or ...


2

Yes it is and tasty too. There are some good recipes at the riverford.co.uk recipe pages. I've cooked most of the recipes on that page, I particularly like the Wet & Wild Garlic Risotto and Spring green & Parmesan Tart. I've never tried eating the flowers though I've also read they were edible. I also didn't know that some Yarg was wrapped in wild ...


2

Wild garlic is perfectly edible. My usual ways of cooking it are either to eat it raw (after washing) as a salad leaf, or to saute it like spinach (and it will reduce by a similar amount). It can either be cooked on its own, or mixed with spinach. The only caveat I have is that some people find that eating a lot (2 x similar portion of spinach) may have a ...


2

Wild garlic is very definitely edible and quite delicious! I eat all parts of it (leaves, stems and flowers) but usually only when it is young (before the flowers are fully out). I think it is delicious wilted in a frying pan with some butter or olive oil (like spinach). I've also used it to make pesto (in place of basil). Don't be put off by the ...


2

If you're feeling extra adventurous, you can eat it raw! If you fold up the nettle leaf, such that it "breaks" the little pricklers (they're like little needles) on leaf, you should be able to eat it without issue. The trick is to fold/roll the leaf up all over and tightly, so it forms a small compact ball. Your stomach acid is much stronger than the formic ...


2

Like a lot of other people have said, cooking neutralises the sting, but blending them to a paste, in an oil or a pesto works too. The reason for this is that the sting is not just the acid component, but the delivery mechanism: the little hairs on the leaves are hollow, and act as little hypodermic needles. If you blend the leaves, you destroy the little ...


2

We've made Indian-style saag paneer with nettle and it was great! Just substituted the spinach/mustard-greens with the nettle.


2

I remember buying in pharmacies a liquid prepared on the spot, from mint powder and saline solution (unfortunately this mix is sort of local-specific to our Romanian pharmacies, so I cannot provide a link). This was applied on mosquito bites and allergy rash - it stopped the itching for an hour or two. Based on this experience: try some sort of minty cream ...


2

I have no knowledge of the plant, but I did find some interesting information, which I hope will help you. Western Poison Oak, also called Pacific Poison Oak, is common in your region. Poison oak, also known as Western poison oak (Toxicodendron diversilobum), is native to western North America with a distribution extending from British Columbia to the ...


1

This has been answered at http://skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/3031/does-rubbing-a-dock-leaf-on-a-sting-from-a-stinging-nettle-help-to-reduce-pain For posterity I will recreate the answer This is from a forum post so it could use a bit more of a hard reference, but it contains some useful and verifiable info: It is said that nettle stings ...



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