Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Wild garlic is perfectly edible. My usual ways of cooking it are either to eat it raw (after washing) as a salad leaf, or to saute it like spinach (and it will reduce by a similar amount). It can either be cooked on its own, or mixed with spinach. The only caveat I have is that some people find that eating a lot (2 x similar portion of spinach) may have a ...


1

Wild garlic is very definitely edible and quite delicious! I eat all parts of it (leaves, stems and flowers) but usually only when it is young (before the flowers are fully out). I think it is delicious wilted in a frying pan with some butter or olive oil (like spinach). I've also used it to make pesto (in place of basil). Don't be put off by the ...


15

Here in Slovenia, the use of wild garlic is quite widespread. Although the whole plant, including bulbs, is edible, leaves are most commonly used. I tried only leaves so far, so I can share my experience with only them. Gathering Young, light-green leaves are a bit more aromatic, but smaller; older are darker and larger. I pick a mix of both and look for ...


1

I've just been sent this article in the Telegraph about it It says: At this time of year (May) the flowers (a nice edible addition to a plate) are also a giveaway: delicate, thin, six white-petalled things forming into rough globes that look like exploding fireworks. The true test of wild garlic however is the scent. Usually you will smell it ...


2

Wikipedia is basically right – you can safely eat it (according to the German Wikipedia article the whole plant, however, the leaves are the most used part) and here in Germany they sometimes even sell the leaves in the supermarket. The typical use I know of is the one that is given in the cited Wikipedia text you gave, i.e. adding the leaves to a salad or ...


5

This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...



Top 50 recent answers are included