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17

You could use Naismith's rule which goes as follows: Allow 1 hour for every 3 miles (5 km) forward, plus 1 hour for every 2000 feet (600 metres) of ascent. A lot of hikers in the UK use this as a guide of course bear in mind terrain and altitude! and of course this is not appropriate at higher altitudes. Some sites recommend corrections to the above: ...


9

I feel only qualified to answer the first portion of your question: When you are in a rural area, just ask if someone lets you set up camp on their property. Farmers often don't mind. Whenever I had the chance to do it this way I did. I sleep a lot sounder not thinking about police officers waking me up at 6AM and you are interacting with the local ...


9

I can not give a lot of information about hitchhiking but have spend a lot of time wildcamping in Europe. Sure most land is privatly owned, and most countries have regulations against it, but in most cases you will be fine and undisturbed if you take some things into account: Try to hide your tent, only set it up right before you want to go sleep. Find a ...


8

It depends a lot on what exactly you mean by "around there". While there are no real mountains in the immediate area around Prague, you can find a number of great places to hike there. If you a willing to go a bit further, you can find some nice mountains, too. Also, I am not sure if by two day hike you mean a backpacking trip with sleeping outdoors, or if ...


8

Ask specific questions here, or browse the other questions and answers! For your first time, try and make sure you have fun. The following may help: Check the weather forecast, avoid cold, wet, windy or whatever weather will make you miserable. Practice pitching your tent before you go, perhaps in your garden or local park. Pitching an unfamiliar tent can ...


8

Time of year is very important Bucks don't keep their antlers year round. They grow towards the fall and drop in earlyish spring. This time of year, if you did not lift the tail and check, it may have been a buck. Outside of mating season, you probably have zero concern. No antlers, no worry. During mating season bucks can be VERY territorial. ...


7

Here's one data point, also based on the Grand Canyon. I'm a 40 year old male, of average fitness and slightly overweight (5'10", 215 lbs.), and ascending the Grand Canyon (4320', ~1300 m) took me almost exactly one day. By contrast, the descent took me 3 hours. (The rule of thumb at the Grand Canyon is that every hour down takes two hours up.) Later ...


7

There's no general rule of thumb that I know of... I lied, there is Naismith's formula as correctly cited in another answer. I just tend to stay away from it because more often than not I find it better to make a judgement on the individual situation. There's so much variation the "average" would almost always be wrong in any specific case! It depends on ...


7

To me, hiking is totally different from the rest of the activities on the list. A hike is just walking. The other possibilities require a lot more technical skill, gear, trust, and experience. In those cases, the most important thing to get a feel for is what the other person's experiences have been. For example, if you're looking for a partner for ...


6

Generally the far from the civilization you go, the safer your things are. Thiefs are operating there where people live or where there are a lot of people. Distant rocks, caves etc. are not their target. I have not heard of something being stolen from someone's luggage in mountains, for example. If some point is at least a few km far from the place where ...


6

Hide your pack or move it a bit off the trail. Make sure you do not overdo it and end up not being able to find it back yourself. :-) Although you are in the wood, if you are in a popular area, it is possible that other local visit the same area. I've never heard of people bringing alarms for their bags and don't recommend it. I doubt it will be of any help ...


6

For every item, I weigh up the regularity of use, vs the urgency of use. For example, my kettle and mug and lunch are always right at the top. My medkit, raincoat, light jersey, headlamp and pocket knife are in the side pockets or top pocket. Anything I will only use at camp is at the bottom (so generally, my camp clothing, sleeping stuff, toiletries, etc) ...


6

I have always viewed packing of backpack in terms of: Ease of access. Distribution of weight to prevent unwanted strain. Distribution of weight is a very important aspect that you have to consider while trekking for a longer duration. Ideally, the heavier things should be closer to your body and the lighter ones away from you. The logic being, the center ...


5

You can use IFTTT (If This, Then That). You can use it to create your own rules to check the weather for you and then email or even text you with a link and what kind of condition changes. For example, mine is set to email me whenever there is more than X change in temperature, or if it is going to specifically rain/snow or have something out of the blue ...


5

The website of the Heilbronner Hütte has a pretty nifty leaflet concerning the tour you are planning. It is in German but I guess you'll be able to read the graph. Be aware that it states: Diese großartige und abwechslungsreiche aber sehr lange Tour wird nur ausdauernden Berggehern empfohlen. which roughly translates to "This amazing and varied, yet ...


5

First, sorry to hear the diagnosis, but you are not alone. I've shopped out many a trip for gluten-free clients, and, fortunately, it is surprisingly easy to replace just about every back-country meal** with a gluten free alternative. Quinoa. Corn. Rice. Potato. Soy... there are lots of substitutes. Most large grocery stores in the US are getting better ...


4

Specifically for biking, they do make spray cans to keep dangerous animals away. Most of my experience with these products have been dealing with loose dogs. I would think it could be used for an animal the size of a buck, but obviously more research than my word should be taken there. Dog repellent Larger animal (bear) repellent I haven't seen any spray ...


4

You always learn how to do things better by doing them. But take baby steps: Start by spending a night in your back yard. See if you can do dinner, sleep, breakfast without going back in the house. Take note of what things you use and what things you don't. There are campgrounds you can drive to. So drive to one & spend the night. If things don't go ...


4

There is really only one way to determine this, and that is experience. Do a few hikes in different terrain, different settings (dayhike vs overnight), different weather and different group sizes, keep track of your time and thus build up a "library" of situations and times. Once you have a few of these reference hikes, you can then apply these to new ...


4

There are many wave height buoys along the Atlantic sea board and would allow for much better prediction than weather system prediction. There are some good resource for surf forecasting on the east coast such as http://www.surfguru.com/ (no affiliation) which is focused on Florida but does provide information up through SC.


4

This isn't pretty, and seems to be somewhat limited in locations (I couldn't get it to work for my area) but this looks to have potential. Though there is no "subscribe" feature. National Weather Service Weather Activity Planner (Example)


4

There's no such site that I know of, but there's a couple of alternatives that may suit your needs: Google calendar has an add on you can enable which shows the weather as an icon by the next few days. I find this quite useful (obviously it depends if you use Google calendar!) There's a few websites which will do a general email newsletter. While you want ...


4

Getting trail conditions is region-specific. For example, in New England the Appalachian Mountain Club provides a good deal of trail info. I'm pretty sure there is a web site about trail conditions, but for the White Mountains of New Hampshire you can get trail conditions info directly at the Pinkham Notch visitor center run by the AMC, the National Forest ...


4

This will depend a lot on the region you are hiking. Hiking in the Adirondacks, for example, trip reports from forums are often useful. There are some general trip report sites, but if the area you are hiking sees a good amount of use, it is likely you'll be able to find a site with specific trip reports for it. Try searching Google for something similar ...


4

I follow a paleotic diet (which is gluten-free) for fairly similar reasons. I will give you some of my recommendations; I have tried them all myself except for the hard boiled eggs: Beef jerky/pemiccan: it is very nutritious. It's my number 1 recommendation for food on the trail (regardless of whether you have celiac disease or not). You can make it ...


4

I've had celiac for 8 years now. I am self described outdoor enthusiast and celiac is nothing that should hold you back from having fun. Out on the trail I eat quinoa, brown and black rice (black rice is super healthy), dried fruits, nuts. I'll normally bring one or two cans of soup or baked beans, sometimes canned chili, corn tortillas, jerky, lentils, ...


4

There are three main, popular trekking regions in Nepal - the Anapurna circuit, the trek to the Everest Base Camp (and side trips) and the area surrounding Gosaikund, which includes the Langtang valley and Helambu. All three of these treks are very popular and quite safe; I saw people of all ages, including families and children. There's a good page on Nepal ...


4

I did this trek in early April (of 2004), flying to Lukla and walking to Kala Patar and the base camp. However, I didn't sleep at Gorakshep (the highest point at which it was possible to sleep in a lodge) but at Lobuche (4900 m). I purchased a -10 degrees Celsius (14F) sleeping bag in Kathmandu, which was fine for me. At Lobuche my water bottle froze during ...


4

There are several equivalents just as there is for the AT. I would consider Halfmile maps combined with PocketPCT. Halfmile's PCT maps 'Erik the Black' books PCT Data Book Pocket PCT U.S. Forest Service PCT Yogi's Wilderness Press books / databook ('official') The PCTA also provides a listing and sells books. Guthook has a review on his blog entry. I ...



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