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14

There are few things which may go wrong: Injury. Carry some kind of the shelter. It may take few hours for mountain rescue to get to your group. Tired. Make sure you have alternative shorter and simpler route in your head. Dehydrated. Carry a bit of extra water or a purification tablets to gather water from streams. Scared. Your rope can serve a good ...


11

A trek group should have a Leader who walks in front who leads the trail/route/climb, sometimes cleaning the route or navigating the route. I believe that will be you. Then the second most important person is the Back Lead, who is the last head you have, who makes sure that the pace of the group is maintained and adapted as per the slowest member. You'll ...


7

As Jim alluded to, you need to be very explicit about gear. I've taken groups of 2-6 very inexperienced people on assorted trips, from strenuous dayhikes to backpacking trips. Here's things I usually make sure to include: Be very strict about no cotton clothing, and explain why. People may show up with cotton sweatshirts when they really need a fleece ...


7

To me, hiking is totally different from the rest of the activities on the list. A hike is just walking. The other possibilities require a lot more technical skill, gear, trust, and experience. In those cases, the most important thing to get a feel for is what the other person's experiences have been. For example, if you're looking for a partner for ...


7

I have always viewed packing of backpack in terms of: Ease of access. Distribution of weight to prevent unwanted strain. Distribution of weight is a very important aspect that you have to consider while trekking for a longer duration. Ideally, the heavier things should be closer to your body and the lighter ones away from you. The logic being, the center ...


7

For every item, I weigh up the regularity of use, vs the urgency of use. For example, my kettle and mug and lunch are always right at the top. My medkit, raincoat, light jersey, headlamp and pocket knife are in the side pockets or top pocket. Anything I will only use at camp is at the bottom (so generally, my camp clothing, sleeping stuff, toiletries, etc) ...


6

There are any number of ways to do this, but perhaps the simplest is to use something similar to this belt mounting clip and have one of your rucksack straps fed through the belt loops: I would suggest mounting it either on the back of your pack, and allowing the camera to hang lens down, or on the top if you have a pack wide enough to avoid it hitting ...


5

When I pack my backpack in the morning, I sort everything into two categories: Things I will (almost) certainly not need before I set up camp again (sleeping bag, tent, kitchen, most food, etc.) Things I might or certainly will need before I set up camp again. Usually, the two categories don't change. The only item that changes is the items I need for ...


4

I've had celiac for 8 years now. I am self described outdoor enthusiast and celiac is nothing that should hold you back from having fun. Out on the trail I eat quinoa, brown and black rice (black rice is super healthy), dried fruits, nuts. I'll normally bring one or two cans of soup or baked beans, sometimes canned chili, corn tortillas, jerky, lentils, ...


4

While there's always more uncertainty in climbing with someone you don't directly know, don't discount finding partners online altogether. I've had great experiences (primarily rock climbing) with partners I ended up meeting online, and otherwise I wouldn't have climbed that day. Some things you can do to make sure you stay safe: Ask them for their ...


4

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? ...


4

Here are a few items that I find easy to pack, and are usually needed by at least a few people in a group: ziplock bags for waterproofing valuables unscented baby wipes for a quick personal cleaning ibuprofen or acetaminophen for minor aches and pain 3M "transpore" medical tape adheres well to skin in wet conditions hard candies always provide a morale ...


3

For Everyone: micro/mini LED flashlight. I don't care if it's on a keychain, whatever. BIC or similar lighter that works, at least half full. For Your 1st Aid Kit mylar "space blanket" 23 years ago I got caught on a Yosemite switchback trail down-climb; end-of-day, all exhausted. Between the trees and western mountains the local "darkness" was about ...


3

First of all I have to admit that the following is mostly not based on knowledge but more or less on educated guessing, so take it with a grain of salt. Alpine tours Let's first consider hiring a guide in the Alps (maximum height below 5000m). Here the answer, if you will be asked for a tour book should be in nearly all cases "No". Here we can just divide ...


3

No one uses them as absolute evidence, as you could always fake them, but they can really help a tour guide get a feel for your level of experience and to understand which situations you felt comfortable with and which caused you problems. They also help you remember how a particular tour went, as afterwards you may not remember in detail.


3

Look a the Peak Design Capture Camera Clip. It is designed to attach to the strap of a backpack or a belt. The clip screws on around your backpack strap, and a quick-release plate screws onto the tripod socket on your camera. Then that slides into the clip, and locks in place. So it should be easy to take the camera on or off while walking.


2

Naismith's rule is a good starting point, but it doesn't really cover unusual trail conditions. My rule of thumb is to convert distance, elevation, and trail condition to "equivalent miles": Each mile is a mile. Each 500 feet of elevation gain is a mile. Distance traveled on snow or loose rock counts double. Distance traveled above 7000 feet elevation ...


2

Personally I would not want to mount a camera on a backpack. Sooner or later you're going to slip or bump into something and the camera is going to get hurt. Mounted on the backpack doesn't sound like it will be easily available. If you're not walking around ready to take a picture as the right situation arises, then put the camera in the pack. You say ...


2

Stuff is first put into plastic bags according to type. I use different coloured carrier bags so I can tell what is in each bag easily. There may be bags for small things within a larger bag. The pack is fully waterproof and only has an opening at the top. First goes in clothes. Underwear and socks. (For a soft landing when I drop the bag on the ground.) ...


2

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...


1

At the very least, you'll want some type of plastic bottle. You can cut the end off of your plastic bottle and layer in ground ( smashed ) charcoal from your camp fire along with cotton, sand, grass, most anything you can get your hands on to filter out the different sized particles. Charcoal being the most likely to weed out micro organisms. ...


1

It's next to impossible to answer your question in a classic "if this/then this" kind of format. There are so many variables and factors that would contribute to choosing what a priority is in any situation like this one. Many will try to "armchair" a situation like this, but really, it's better to have a "toolbox" full of useful skills and techniques that ...


1

Two things come to mind above all else Keep your mind & wits about you Water With these two you can survive a ton of scenarios. Stay alert, don't let panic set-in, maintain a positive mindset and stay hydrated as much as you can. If you can do those above all else then good things will happen.


1

I've found a few different ways to do this. Each with it's own pros and cons. BlackRapid shoulder strap Toploader chest pouch CottonCarrier Vest CottonCarrier Strapshot Personally I go between the CottonCarrier vest which offers the fastest access and the Toploader chest pouch if I'm worried about the weather. Your camera just clips into the ...


1

I have used the listed below website for as long as they have been around. They provide very detailed and regularly updated maps from the national survey association. I recommend getting a lamination machine and printing off these maps that are along the trail just before leaving for your trip. The weight is no more than carrying the Guthook book. ...


1

I have several gluten-intolerant people in my life, and though I haven't taken them camping, here's how I would feed them. Breakfast: for a short trip, bring some gluten-free muffins or bagels. For a longer trip, learn how to make a dough (premix the rice flour, xanthan gum etc at home) you can rise and then fry into English muffins. Not kidding, we did ...


1

Last year I was taught an approximation by a mountaineer guide. It is an average and worked quite well for me. Of course you need adaption for alpine tours (3000m+), physical condition, weather, extremely rough paths and so on. The rule is: 4km per hour on a flat path 400m altitude per hour take the so calculated longer time and add the half of the ...



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