Hot answers tagged

26

Don't get wet! No I'm not being facetious, I hike through the rain forests of BC all the time, I've spent days in a row in solid rain while backpacking and setting up camp. Getting wet up here can mean death overnight even in the middle of summer, doesn't matter how hot it gets during the day, temperatures can drop to near zero overnight, if you're wet when ...


17

What precautions should you take when going on a backpacking trip around the length of one week? Build a rough route card, where you plan to be and when. Give it to someone you trust who will keep track of you. That way if you get into serious trouble and can't get help yourself there will be someone to raise the alarm. Better than lying in a ditch with ...


13

It depends on your destination. In general I would think of: Preparation organise one or more detailed map(s) of the area to go to check the weather forecast organise your way to your destination and back home (in case you do not start walking at your door). This could include: check public transport and buy tickets check fuel of your car; rent a car; ...


10

TL;DR: Bring a set of clothes that are comfy-when-wet and expect to spend a lot of time in them. Keep a set of dry clothes for in-the-tent-only use. Don't ever let your wet clothes come into contact with your dry clothes, cause now you have a whole lot of damp clothes. I've done a lot of 3-week canoe trips and 3+ day winter hikes at -30 C (-22 F) ...


9

My two concerns for trekking in wet weather are safety and comfort. The safety issue here is primarily hypothermia, which can be a real risk even in the upper 40s or lower 50s (F), if you're wet enough and out for a long period. Definitely something to be aware of. But even if you're warm enough to be safe, being soaking wet for a week just plain sucks- you'...


9

A rolled up sleeping pad is generally pretty lightweight, meaning the "you could misbalance your pack and strain your back" concern is probably one you can ignore. People try not put them inside because they may not fit, or they may get squashed. If the pads are waterproof, which is common, you really don't need to worry about the pad getting wet from ...


9

I use a pac safe metal mesh for my plane travel as my pack is a camping pack not a travel pack with lockable pockets. http://www.blessthisstuff.com/stuff/wear/bags-luggage/bag-protector-by-pacsafe/ With a simple padlock and the length of cable you should be able to link it to a tree and put the key in your pocket or around your neck.


9

I think having it vertically using side compression straps or bungees on the rear of the bag effects movement the least (ie not getting caught on stuff). As Kate Gregory mentions the pads are really light and don't affect the balance of the bag too much so I wouldn't worry about that. foam pads like the one you have are also really tough! Unlike an ...


8

As well as checking the weather forecast you should research the general weather conditions for the area you will be visiting, often conditions in hilly or mountainous areas can change quickly and without warning so you should be prepared for the worst possible conditions you might encounter. This also includes checking sunset times for the time of year. ...


7

Some good answers here, but so far no-one has mentioned perhaps the single most important safety-factor: Understand the reality of the hazards you are facing, and be sure you have the skills to cope with them Depending on the area and the season, the risk factors you should be considering might include: Weather: How challenging can it get? Do you ...


7

I switched to using a self inflating mattress years ago, mostly because of the problem of the bulk of foam mats, and having them outside the pack while working though dense bush. Inside as shown is really not useful. The mat does not conform to the contours of the pack pack, leaving very little space for your gear. If you have space inside your pack, role ...


6

Iceland has some of the remotest landscapes in Europe and its not difficult to find solitude and choose a hiking route where there are neither vehicles nor people if you so wish. With a population of only 300'000 in a country the same size as Ireland, it is 80% uninhabited and very easy to enter a completely remote and untouched hiking destination. As an ...


6

Here is some useful advice from "How to keep your backpack safe", an article on StartBackpacking.com. It's aimed at backpacking travellers rather than hikers, but some of the advice is still relevant. Here are some easy tips for not becoming one of the unlucky people who lose bags: Don’t Be Too Patriotic Consider your home country’s political ...


6

This depends greatly on the situation at hand and there are enormous amounts of factors that will effect your decision to build in a specific location. For example, if you are in an extremely remote location and are more likely to be stranded for a long period of time, it may be more beneficial for you to seek shelter as a means of survival rather than ...


5

Backpacking in rain is pretty normal in Oregon—especially along the coast and in the western Cascades. No matter the time of year, it is usually not more than a week until the next rain shower (except this summer which is unusually dry). I don't take any special or particular precautions. The Ten Essentials have been learned from thousands upon ...


5

The phone number is right: + 34 956 70 97 33 (Grazalema's park visitors centre, El Bosque) You can send an email to this address: cv_elbosque@agenciamedioambienteyagua.es In this mail, you must provide: Passport number. Number of persons. Date of the visit. Trail to follow (read below, the restricted area you want to visit). Restricted areas are: ...


4

If you are in a wooded area you can always hang your pack in a tree like you would to avoid bears eating your food at night. There are two advantages to this approach. The pack won't be messed with by animals (bears, mice, racoons, etc.) who want to eat your tasty food. It will be a minor deterrent to two-legged predators if your rope is thin and an ...


4

Shelter is by far the most important initial consideration. Since you are stranded there anyway, you will have the opportunity to move your camp. Since you specify a tropical island, you want shelter from the sun more than anything else. You won't freeze to death in the tropics if you aren't on a mountain top. So in order of importance based on time before ...


3

Everyone has given a lot of good advice about clothing and shoes. I'd like to add to what ShemSeger said about the tent. If you are expecting rain, or if it is raining, you want to be extra careful about how you set up your tent. Normally, you would just be looking for a nice, flat place without stones, but if you're expecting rain, that nice flat place can ...


3

I'll second the earlier nomination of the "ten essentials" list (@Nate Eldredge). There are two versions of this list, with the classic version of the list tracing its roots back to the 1930's. These lists are presented convenently on REI's web site (http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/ten-essentials.html), but I will reproduce them below for posterity. ...


3

As far as precautions go, look at everything and ask the question "what happens if it breaks?" It's much better to have several pounds of gear that you don't use, because the one time you do need it, you really do need it! The most pointless piece of equipment is the spare that's sat on the shelf at home. :) I'm used to solo walking, so I pack heavy and ...


3

I just came in from a 3 mile hike and I am the kind of person you're talking about. It took me 1 hour on a flat surface, well maintained trail through the woods. So 3 mph is a good general rule of thumb for your average joe on level ground, no heavy backpack, no speed competition, but no stopping to smell the roses and take pictures, breaks. etc. I'm not ...


3

As general rule a physical assessment is necessary as it can be the result of compensation for other problems (flat feet or hyperlordosis for example, just to name a couple). The treatment involves stretching the Iliotibial Band itself (eventual thickening cant be reduced that way but the ITB is attached to muscles so stretching that has a direct effect on ...


2

I hike a lot in the Rocky Mountains. 2.5 mph up is a good number. Less coming down. Deduct about half an hour for a 4 mile 1 way hike coming down.


2

First-in = Last-out. In order: Sleeping bag Those three more or less together, the heavier pieces closer to the back Sleeping pad (if fits in the backpack) Camp clothes Tent Camp stuff, mostly: Food (Except for day food) Kitchen Book Depending on the weather Extra day clothes if any Rain shell if any Stuff that need to be accessible in top/side ...


2

Assuming that you have the right kind of a backpack according to your requirements. First, you need to separate things that you need frequently and things you'll need less often. The way I camp/trek and plan things, I am okay to pack everything all over again in the morning. Generally, it is best suited to pack lighter items in the bottom of the pack and ...


2

Depends on how much you put on. It may be helpful to first identify why you are a mosquito magnet. Mosquitos are attracted to primarily two things that you can control: odour and heat. Unfortunately, about 85% of what makes people mosquito magnets is suspected to be genetics, so there's not much you can do about that, except to try and mask the scent of ...


2

Yes, there are a few facts to hold in mind. Roving is much fun but you really have to take care about a few points. Don't shoot where other people enjoy their free-time Never shoot towards trails, lanes, paths, tracks and so on Never shoot without a proper backstop Always use field tips Always bring your on roving target Never shoot without a spacious ...


2

I struggle with my IT bands, first time it hit me I was deep in the backcountry on the top of a saddle ridge, and it was a 14km agonizing hike down to the nearest cabin. You can't really stretch your IT band, it's not a muscle, it's connective tissue. It's connected to your tensor fasciae latae, but stretching that muscle doesn't help much either, the ...


1

Start at the edge and work your way out. The ice will usually be thinnest where the water flows INTO to pond or lake, and will be thickest close to the tail. That's because the ice is being pushed that way. Take samples as you work your way out onto the ice to continue to measure the thickness.



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