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21

Don't get wet! No I'm not being facetious, I hike through the rain forests of BC all the time, I've spent days in a row in solid rain while backpacking and setting up camp. Getting wet up here can mean death overnight even in the middle of summer, doesn't matter how hot it gets during the day, temperatures can drop to near zero overnight, if you're wet when ...


16

Invite them both on a day hike. That's a end onto itself, so no need to pretend anything else. You can watch the interaction between #2 and #3, and talk about experiences to find out what #3's qualifications are. If after that you still think #3 is a good fit with you and #2, then suggest to #2 to invite #3 along on your backpacking trip. If he agrees, ...


15

There are few things which may go wrong: Injury. Carry some kind of the shelter. It may take few hours for mountain rescue to get to your group. Tired. Make sure you have alternative shorter and simpler route in your head. Dehydrated. Carry a bit of extra water or a purification tablets to gather water from streams. Scared. Your rope can serve a good ...


14

What precautions should you take when going on a backpacking trip around the length of one week? Build a rough route card, where you plan to be and when. Give it to someone you trust who will keep track of you. That way if you get into serious trouble and can't get help yourself there will be someone to raise the alarm. Better than lying in a ditch ...


11

A trek group should have a Leader who walks in front who leads the trail/route/climb, sometimes cleaning the route or navigating the route. I believe that will be you. Then the second most important person is the Back Lead, who is the last head you have, who makes sure that the pace of the group is maintained and adapted as per the slowest member. You'll ...


9

My two concerns for trekking in wet weather are safety and comfort. The safety issue here is primarily hypothermia, which can be a real risk even in the upper 40s or lower 50s (F), if you're wet enough and out for a long period. Definitely something to be aware of. But even if you're warm enough to be safe, being soaking wet for a week just plain sucks- ...


9

How much water you need depends on how big you are, how fit you are, where you are and what you're doing. For example, on Mount Everest, the average person needs to drink 4-5L of water each day just so that their body can function properly. You lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. If you're a big guy that's out of shape, ...


8

This seems a bit low to me, but there are lots of other factors to consider. The main ones are temperature and exertion/walking speed. Different people also definitely need different amounts of water. One of my friends was nicknamed desert-man as he drank approximately 4x as much as everyone else. If you are in the UK or a similarly cool climate, then 100ml ...


8

TL;DR: Bring a set of clothes that are comfy-when-wet and expect to spend a lot of time in them. Keep a set of dry clothes for in-the-tent-only use. Don't ever let your wet clothes come into contact with your dry clothes, cause now you have a whole lot of damp clothes. I've done a lot of 3-week canoe trips and 3+ day winter hikes at -30 C (-22 F) ...


7

As Jim alluded to, you need to be very explicit about gear. I've taken groups of 2-6 very inexperienced people on assorted trips, from strenuous dayhikes to backpacking trips. Here's things I usually make sure to include: Be very strict about no cotton clothing, and explain why. People may show up with cotton sweatshirts when they really need a fleece ...


6

Having suffered similar on a marathon I had to run in freezing rain once (ending up with not just large areas with the skin chafed off entirely, but also deep cuts into my thigh muscles from the stitching!) I can heartily recommend combining very supportive underwear with non-slip, stretch leggings. This way the only rubbing will be between the underwear ...


6

All these are well and good, but "No training plan survives contact with real life". Doing something vaguely aerobic that you enjoy doing for several hours at a stretch one or two times a week is far better than the "optimal" aerobic exercise that you never do. The best training for long days in the mountains is long days in the mountains. If you can't ...


5

Instead of running or walking, I recommend you go to the gym and do the Stairmaster. This will provide an aerobic workout while building the muscles you need for hiking and scrambling. This is what I do to get in shape for backpacking trips. Edit 3/5/2015: Providing an answer to anatols questions in the comments: I use the Stairmaster 4-5 times a week, 30 ...


5

I would add that I did Jiri to EBC in Feb 1992 (the coldest time of year?) and found it to be cold (4 season sleeping bag) but manageable. I am just re-reading my diary from the time - and the noticeable thing is that the cold is mentioned quite a lot - but my 'whining about the cold' is ALWAYS related to wind. So make sure you have windproof gear handy to ...


5

From an outdoor recreation point of view, is it relevant who manages a national monument? Yes! There are several resons why it's important who manages the land. For a start they control how the land is managed. Should it be farmed, should it be left to nature, should x area be allowed to flood or should we repair the dykes, etc., etc. This has a ...


5

IMHO, up to a certain level in mountaineering, friends that you make in mountains or at a base camp are likely to be good/close friends for life. So, If I were the guy with the lesser experience in mountaineering and being set up in a meeting for an approval sort of a thing from a veteran, that might go wrong, because the veteran guy on the other end can ...


5

If you wanted to avoid the 4WD areas* my suggestion would be to make your start point for a multi-day hike at one of the furthest reaches of a 4WD trail. And if that trail is one of the lesser used ones, you should be well away from petrol-based signs of civilisation rapidly. That said, with the ongoing popularity of volcano watching in Iceland, you'll ...


5

I found this interesting article on the topic of cold weather and hydration. http://www.unh.edu/news/news_releases/2005/january/sk_050128cold.html In cold weather you lose significant moisture just by breathing the dry air. Even in 100% humidity ( very rare in winter) the cold air can suck moisture from your lungs since it warms up in the lungs and can ...


5

No, 100 ml per hour is way too little in many circumstances. That would mean only 1 l over a 10 hour hike. Anyone that's been on a 10 hour hike, even not in particularly hot or dry weather, can tell you that's not nearly enough. For hiking in hot desert conditions, 1 l per hour (10 times your suggestion) is more like it. I have done significant hiking in ...


5

Backpacking in rain is pretty normal in Oregon—especially along the coast and in the western Cascades. No matter the time of year, it is usually not more than a week until the next rain shower (except this summer which is unusually dry). I don't take any special or particular precautions. The Ten Essentials have been learned from thousands upon ...


4

No, it doesn't matter much. The regulations for what can be done in a national monument or park (the only difference between the two is that one is established by presidential edict, the other by act of congress) are pretty strict, so there won't be huge differences in what you are allowed to do in one national monument compared to another. That said, each ...


4

Here are a few items that I find easy to pack, and are usually needed by at least a few people in a group: ziplock bags for waterproofing valuables unscented baby wipes for a quick personal cleaning ibuprofen or acetaminophen for minor aches and pain 3M "transpore" medical tape adheres well to skin in wet conditions hard candies always provide a morale ...


4

In short: Build up your base endurance! This will give you the ability to perform at moderate intensity over several hours and to recover quickly after the tour. This means, try to get many low-intensity but long training sessions. For your cardiovascular system it doesn't matter in the first place whether you do this by bike, running or hiking, just keep ...


3

What kind of trip are you planning for? It makes a big difference if you are going for a multi-pitch climb on an alpine route, a long distance trekking trip maybe even in high altitude or a sporty one day hike. For a simpler hiking trip I would say if you are used to each other already from work, just go for your trip and enjoy it. Requirements are small ...


3

A personal anecdote. Two fairly unfit blokes go to the Alps and spend a week on long but easy training climbs. Then they are joined by two athlete friends who are in hard marathon training. The two fairly unfit blokes who have trained in the Alps proceed to walk the runners into the ground for the next few days till their friends build up their Alpine ...


3

I suffered from chaffing for years and tried a whole range of options. What I found that worked best is the Under Armour Original Boxer Jocks, the 9" version. They cover most of the thigh and holds well enough to keep everything separated to avoid the chaffing. I get them from USA when they go on sale, but Wiggle, SportShoes and others stock them. If a ...


3

For Everyone: micro/mini LED flashlight. I don't care if it's on a keychain, whatever. BIC or similar lighter that works, at least half full. For Your 1st Aid Kit mylar "space blanket" 23 years ago I got caught on a Yosemite switchback trail down-climb; end-of-day, all exhausted. Between the trees and western mountains the local "darkness" was about ...


3

As far as precautions go, look at everything and ask the question "what happens if it breaks?" It's much better to have several pounds of gear that you don't use, because the one time you do need it, you really do need it! The most pointless piece of equipment is the spare that's sat on the shelf at home. :) I'm used to solo walking, so I pack heavy and ...


3

Everyone has given a lot of good advice about clothing and shoes. I'd like to add to what ShemSeger said about the tent. If you are expecting rain, or if it is raining, you want to be extra careful about how you set up your tent. Normally, you would just be looking for a nice, flat place without stones, but if you're expecting rain, that nice flat place can ...


2

I just came in from a 3 mile hike and I am the kind of person you're talking about. It took me 1 hour on a flat surface, well maintained trail through the woods. So 3 mph is a good general rule of thumb for your average joe on level ground, no heavy backpack, no speed competition, but no stopping to smell the roses and take pictures, breaks. etc. I'm not ...



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