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15

There are few things which may go wrong: Injury. Carry some kind of the shelter. It may take few hours for mountain rescue to get to your group. Tired. Make sure you have alternative shorter and simpler route in your head. Dehydrated. Carry a bit of extra water or a purification tablets to gather water from streams. Scared. Your rope can serve a good ...


14

Invite them both on a day hike. That's a end onto itself, so no need to pretend anything else. You can watch the interaction between #2 and #3, and talk about experiences to find out what #3's qualifications are. If after that you still think #3 is a good fit with you and #2, then suggest to #2 to invite #3 along on your backpacking trip. If he agrees, ...


11

A trek group should have a Leader who walks in front who leads the trail/route/climb, sometimes cleaning the route or navigating the route. I believe that will be you. Then the second most important person is the Back Lead, who is the last head you have, who makes sure that the pace of the group is maintained and adapted as per the slowest member. You'll ...


7

As Jim alluded to, you need to be very explicit about gear. I've taken groups of 2-6 very inexperienced people on assorted trips, from strenuous dayhikes to backpacking trips. Here's things I usually make sure to include: Be very strict about no cotton clothing, and explain why. People may show up with cotton sweatshirts when they really need a fleece ...


6

There are any number of ways to do this, but perhaps the simplest is to use something similar to this belt mounting clip and have one of your rucksack straps fed through the belt loops: I would suggest mounting it either on the back of your pack, and allowing the camera to hang lens down, or on the top if you have a pack wide enough to avoid it hitting ...


6

How much water you need depends on how big you are, how fit you are, where you are and what you're doing. For example, on Mount Everest, the average person needs to drink 4-5L of water each day just so that their body can function properly. You lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. If you're a big guy that's out of shape, ...


6

This seems a bit low to me, but there are lots of other factors to consider. The main ones are temperature and exertion/walking speed. Different people also definitely need different amounts of water. One of my friends was nicknamed desert-man as he drank approximately 4x as much as everyone else. If you are in the UK or a similarly cool climate, then 100ml ...


5

From an outdoor recreation point of view, is it relevant who manages a national monument? Yes! There are several resons why it's important who manages the land. For a start they control how the land is managed. Should it be farmed, should it be left to nature, should x area be allowed to flood or should we repair the dykes, etc., etc. This has a ...


4

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? ...


4

I've had celiac for 8 years now. I am self described outdoor enthusiast and celiac is nothing that should hold you back from having fun. Out on the trail I eat quinoa, brown and black rice (black rice is super healthy), dried fruits, nuts. I'll normally bring one or two cans of soup or baked beans, sometimes canned chili, corn tortillas, jerky, lentils, ...


4

IMHO, up to a certain level in mountaineering, friends that you make in mountains or at a base camp are likely to be good/close friends for life. So, If I were a the guy with the less experience in mountaineering and being set up in a meeting for an approval sort of a thing from a veteran, that might go wrong, because the veteran guy on the end can have a ...


4

If you wanted to avoid the 4WD areas* my suggestion would be to make your start point for a multi-day hike at one of the furthest reaches of a 4WD trail. And if that trail is one of the lesser used ones, you should be well away from petrol-based signs of civilisation rapidly. That said, with the ongoing popularity of volcano watching in Iceland, you'll ...


4

No, it doesn't matter much. The regulations for what can be done in a national monument or park (the only difference between the two is that one is established by presidential edict, the other by act of congress) are pretty strict, so there won't be huge differences in what you are allowed to do in one national monument compared to another. That said, each ...


4

Here are a few items that I find easy to pack, and are usually needed by at least a few people in a group: ziplock bags for waterproofing valuables unscented baby wipes for a quick personal cleaning ibuprofen or acetaminophen for minor aches and pain 3M "transpore" medical tape adheres well to skin in wet conditions hard candies always provide a morale ...


3

I found this interesting article on the topic of cold weather and hydration. http://www.unh.edu/news/news_releases/2005/january/sk_050128cold.html In cold weather you lose significant moisture just by breathing the dry air. Even in 100% humidity ( very rare in winter) the cold air can suck moisture from your lungs since it warms up in the lungs and can ...


3

No, 100 ml per hour is way too little in many circumstances. That would mean only 1 l over a 10 hour hike. Anyone that's been on a 10 hour hike, even not in particularly hot or dry weather, can tell you that's not nearly enough. For hiking in hot desert conditions, 1 l per hour (10 times your suggestion) is more like it. I have done significant hiking in ...


3

For Everyone: micro/mini LED flashlight. I don't care if it's on a keychain, whatever. BIC or similar lighter that works, at least half full. For Your 1st Aid Kit mylar "space blanket" 23 years ago I got caught on a Yosemite switchback trail down-climb; end-of-day, all exhausted. Between the trees and western mountains the local "darkness" was about ...


3

First of all I have to admit that the following is mostly not based on knowledge but more or less on educated guessing, so take it with a grain of salt. Alpine tours Let's first consider hiring a guide in the Alps (maximum height below 5000m). Here the answer, if you will be asked for a tour book should be in nearly all cases "No". Here we can just divide ...


3

No one uses them as absolute evidence, as you could always fake them, but they can really help a tour guide get a feel for your level of experience and to understand which situations you felt comfortable with and which caused you problems. They also help you remember how a particular tour went, as afterwards you may not remember in detail.


3

Look a the Peak Design Capture Camera Clip. It is designed to attach to the strap of a backpack or a belt. The clip screws on around your backpack strap, and a quick-release plate screws onto the tripod socket on your camera. Then that slides into the clip, and locks in place. So it should be easy to take the camera on or off while walking.


2

Personally I would not want to mount a camera on a backpack. Sooner or later you're going to slip or bump into something and the camera is going to get hurt. Mounted on the backpack doesn't sound like it will be easily available. If you're not walking around ready to take a picture as the right situation arises, then put the camera in the pack. You say ...


2

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...


2

Naismith's rule is a good starting point, but it doesn't really cover unusual trail conditions. My rule of thumb is to convert distance, elevation, and trail condition to "equivalent miles": Each mile is a mile. Each 500 feet of elevation gain is a mile. Distance traveled on snow or loose rock counts double. Distance traveled above 7000 feet elevation ...


2

What kind of trip are you planning for? It makes a big difference if you are going for a multi-pitch climb on an alpine route, a long distance trekking trip maybe even in high altitude or a sporty one day hike. For a simpler hiking trip I would say if you are used to each other already from work, just go for your trip and enjoy it. Requirements are small ...


2

Don't waste time vetting- just do it... Putting things in perspective - you are not arranging a marriage, a round the world sailing trip on an 8 meter sail boat, or a climbing trip into remote Patagonia. You said its 3-4 days - not that long, certainly short enough they can work out how to tolerate each other if the worst happens. I have done many trips of ...


2

Instead of running or walking, I recommend you go to the gym and do the Stairmaster. This will provide an aerobic workout while building the muscles you need for hiking and scrambling. This is what I do to get in shape for backpacking trips. Edit 3/5/2015: Providing an answer to anatols questions in the comments: I use the Stairmaster 4-5 times a week, 30 ...


2

Typically for training for this kind of thing you want to work on two aspects of your fitness, strength (to carry the weight you need for the periods you need without pain/injury) and cardio vascular performance (you want to have the lungs and heart to process as much energy as you can as fast as you can and recover quickly when resting to allow you to ...


2

In short: Build up your base endurance! This will give you the ability to perform at moderate intensity over several hours and to recover quickly after the tour. This means, try to get many low-intensity but long training sessions. For your cardiovascular system it doesn't matter in the first place whether you do this by bike, running or hiking, just keep ...


2

All these are well and good, but "No training plan survives contact with real life". Doing something vaguely aerobic that you enjoy doing for several hours at a stretch one or two times a week is far better than the "optimal" aerobic exercise that you never do. For long days in the mountains, mostly what you need is a good endurance base. So how much ...


1

I think your best bet would be to look at their other National Parks, Vatnajökull is the biggest (It covers 13% of Iceland), but apparently Snæfellsjökull National Park is Iceland's main attraction: Like Rory said in his answer, you're likely going to have to 4x4 to the end of the road to find a good vehicle-free area to hike in. That's what Bear ...



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