Hot answers tagged

31

For the purposes of defense, the only situation that comes to mind would be hiking through an area known for criminal activity ( think marijuana farm ). And even then, is a small handgun really going to help you ward off criminals with assault rifles ( it would probably just get you killed faster )? If you're thinking of situation involving large predators, ...


24

Yes it is possible to sunburn through clothing. Clothing does block some of the Ultraviloet radiation but not 100%. A lot of outdoor recreation clothing is now marketed with treatments that gives additional UV protection.


23

If you need to ask, the answer is almost certainly never. There are places (Northern Quebec, Labrador, Ontario and Manitoba near Hudson's Bay) where due to polar bear activity you should be accompanied by a guide/guard who will have a serious rifle and dedicate significant time to watching for bears while you do your scientific research or marvel at the ...


17

No, there is nothing on the AT that justifies carrying a firearm. The extra weight and space is much more of a detriment than the extremely unlikely and frankly inconceivable case where a firearm would be a help. Since the AT crosses many jurisdictions, there may also be legal issues that could vary every few miles. The whole concept just doesn't make ...


15

All sunscreens are physical barriers, designed to absorb or reflect UV radiation. They rub off over time, and they will rub off faster when exposed to water/moisture, most commonly from sweating or swimming. Friction (e.g. from towel-drying) also removes sunscreen. Some chemical sunscreens do break down when exposed to sunlight and require the addition of ...


12

If you absolutely must have a fire, reset your thinking from "fire pit" to "fire mound" Creating a fire mound is a great way to enjoy a back-country fire with little to no impact to the ground / vegetation. Carry a small sheet of plastic, burlap, or a section of an old fire shelter, or anything of the like (it shouldn't get hot enough to burn if your ...


12

Around sunrise and sunset, the sun is much less intense. You would get around 5 times less intensity in the first or last hour of sunlight than in the middle of the day. Here is a graph of this effect (It's from a paper, though the paper itself is behind a paywall), and another one which also shows the effect of latitude. Therefore, while you can’t say ...


11

Polarized sunglasses, as with other type of sunglasses may not block enough UV to be considered safe. From WikiPedia: for adequate protection, experts recommend sunglasses that reflect or filter out 99-100% of UVA and UVB light, with wavelengths up to 400 nm. Sunglasses which meet this requirement are often labeled as "UV400. In other words, ...


11

As it is stated in this Wikipedia article, the sun protection factor (SPF) roughly describes how the time that your skin is able to protect itself from sunburn is elongated. To take the Wikipedia example: if a person develops a sunburn in 10 minutes when not wearing a sunblock, the same person will prevent sunburn for 150 minutes if he/she wears a ...


10

The wikipedia article on sun protective clothing is very informative. A summary of the relevant parts: Apart from clothing specifically marketed as protecting against the sun most clothing will not block all sun to fully protect you against sunburn depending on circumstances. Some general rules of thumb: Darker clothes provide more protection than ...


10

As found here: "With every 1000 m in altitude, UV levels increase by approximately 10 per cent." Percentages are tricky to work with, so here is a worked-out example. Suppose you start out at sea level (0m), and you climb all the way up to Mt. Everest's summit (8848m). Suppose also that at sealevel, you normally need to apply sun block factor 15. Then, ...


10

Polarization and UV protection on sunglasses are two different things. While UV refers to light of a wavelength of approximately 10nm to 400nm, light of any wavelength can be polarized. Sunglasses with a polarization filter block light, that is horizontally polarized (e.g. light reflected on water). This has no specific effect on UV-light. So polarized ...


10

I'd like to add to the existing answer that while sunscreen effectiveness does decrease as it is absorbed into the body, wears off, or is washed off, high SPF sunscreens will still block most sun after the two hours. The FDA recommendations for reapplication every two hours are basically to provide maximum protection, because the level of protection does ...


9

If you are being attacked by a large predator a "small handgun" will accomplish nothing. If you hit something sensitive you will probably make it angrier - it won't make any difference to you if it dies from it's injuries the day after tomorrow, but at least it had a good final meal. Smith & Wesson used to make a short-barrel .50 revolver aimed at the ...


9

I will only focus on signs to assess the quality of a placed ice screw. There are many factors that influence the outcome like the location, temperature, ... but they deserve an answer of their own. The most important thing is, that the screw is placed all the way in solid ice. On the surface you can judge this easily. The deeper parts are assessed by what ...


7

I used to do a lot of backpacking with my wife in the backcountry in the Rocky Mountains. The places we hiked were remote - often hours would pass without seeing anybody else. I gave thought to getting a handgun, as protection from bad folks and/or wildlife. My father and I are fisherman, not hunters, so my knowledge of wild animals was minimal, and I had ...


7

Those types of glasses do not provide adequate protection from sunlight, especially in areas with lots of reflective surfaces (desert, snow) and at high elevations where there's more UV radiation due to the thinner atmosphere above you. What you want are either wrap-around glasses which don't let light in the sides, or particular glasses called "glacier ...


6

Heat illnesses are about heat, not light, and while the two are not unrelated, the hue of your clothing would be a very minor factor— red would not provide better or worse protection than green or blue or any other part of the visible spectrum. The shade may have some impact: since darker clothing absorbs more energy than lighter clothing, it warms up and ...


6

These are generally known as glacier glasses. They are rated as Category 4 on the CE scale and you aren't supposed to drive while wearing them. Sunglasses in Category 4 only transmit 4-8% of available visible light. Hidalogos sunglass guide has a very complete list of the different factors in choosing sunglasses. Category 4 come in a wider range of ...


5

Your mileage may vary, so know thyself. Start conservative, it is easier to back-off on protection than it is to treat sunburns. SPF 50 is not too high and you may want an even higher SPF when starting. Sunscreen that contains titanium dioxide or zinc oxide is great because they protect against both UVA and UVB. Since they are also inorganic compounds ...


5

You don't need a trad rack of your own in order to follow. If you're climbing with experienced trad leaders who have their own racks, then you also don't need to bring your own rack. If you're going to lead, you just borrow their gear. In your situation, there is really no advantage to buying a lot of trad gear before you try following on trad climbs at all. ...


4

Go to your nearest builder's supermarket, or even check a normal one, and look for worker's gloves. Or mechanic's gloves. Such as are used by people building houses or repairing cars. Those are very resistant and cheap. I've bought my ones for about 2-3$ (price in Poland, but I've found similar gloves in Germany too, only it was a small craftsman's shop). ...


4

Well, insulating the floor from a campfire, which usually has 900-1200 degrees Celsius and burns for several hours, is quite difficult. The soil itself does a decent job, but of course that's the part that you don't want to burn... Restoring life to a scorched patch of soil will take a while, but relatively speaking a couple of scorched patches won't make ...


3

The basic idea of polarizing glasses is not to block all light, it's to block light that undergoes a glancing reflection, such as sunlight coming to your eye off of water or snow from near the horizon. The initially unpolarized light becomes highly polarized by this type of reflection, so by eliminating it, you make it easier to see and be comfortable ...


3

You could look at sailing gloves such as these. There are loads of different varieties with open or closed finger versions depending on your preference. As mentioned by others many sailors also use rubber gardening or builders gloves. These are much cheaper but wear out a lot faster. I'm not sure how much of an issue this would be for kayaking.


3

A skin is a skin, so there's no difference if you take off your T-Shirt or your pants first time in the season. The less the body part is used to the sun, the more protection it needs. Well, the only difference is the skin on the penis, which is usually naturally a bit darker, so it already has more sun protection (which doesn't mean you can't get sunburns ...


3

Good Ice Sounds obvious, but that's the answer, you need to learn how to identify good solid ice for all your screw placements. The best ice is the thickest ice you can find, so you can place your longest screws; clear and blue will be the most solid, while the worst ice is cloudy or brown, full of bubbles (aerated) and 'crunches' when you poke it, or has ...


2

I can't help but think that this question may trolling, but here goes anyway. There is a difference between skin and skin if one includes the glans as it is mucous membrane: anything marked "for external use only" might cause unexpected irritation. Don's humorous remark about capsaicin is a good example that I'm sure more than a few men are accidentally ...


2

A white colour for head protection (and all other clothes) will keep you the coolest, black will keep you the hottest. All other colours are somewhere in between. This is because white fabric reflects the most light (all wavelengths of visible light), while black absorbs all (red reflects only the red channel). As for the efficiency - I have sometimes ...


2

There's two schools of thought here that I know of - the first is to avoid lighting a fire where there's ground you could easily damage, and the second is avoiding the heat getting to the ground. Combine both if you can. As far as the first goes, I won't say a great deal about that because beyond the obvious (being open minded about where you camp and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible