Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

For the purposes of defense, the only situation that comes to mind would be hiking through an area known for criminal activity ( think marijuana farm ). And even then, is a small handgun really going to help you ward off criminals with assault rifles ( it would probably just get you killed faster )? If you're thinking of situation involving large predators, ...


15

No, there is nothing on the AT that justifies carrying a firearm. The extra weight and space is much more of a detriment than the extremely unlikely and frankly inconceivable case where a firearm would be a help. Since the AT crosses many jurisdictions, there may also be legal issues that could vary every few miles. The whole concept just doesn't make ...


13

If you need to ask, the answer is almost certainly never. There are places (Northern Quebec, Labrador, Ontario and Manitoba near Hudson's Bay) where due to polar bear activity you should be accompanied by a guide/guard who will have a serious rifle and dedicate significant time to watching for bears while you do your scientific research or marvel at the ...


13

All sunscreens are physical barriers, designed to absorb or reflect UV radiation. They rub off over time, and they will rub off faster when exposed to water/moisture, most commonly from sweating or swimming. Friction (e.g. from towel-drying) also removes sunscreen. Some chemical sunscreens do break down when exposed to sunlight and require the addition of ...


10

As it is stated in this Wikipedia article, the sun protection factor (SPF) roughly describes how the time that your skin is able to protect itself from sunburn is elongated. To take the Wikipedia example: if a person develops a sunburn in 10 minutes when not wearing a sunblock, the same person will prevent sunburn for 150 minutes if he/she wears a ...


8

Polarized sunglasses, as with other type of sunglasses may not block enough UV to be considered safe. From WikiPedia: for adequate protection, experts recommend sunglasses that reflect or filter out 99-100% of UVA and UVB light, with wavelengths up to 400 nm. Sunglasses which meet this requirement are often labeled as "UV400. In other words, ...


8

I'd like to add to the existing answer that while sunscreen effectiveness does decrease as it is absorbed into the body, wears off, or is washed off, high SPF sunscreens will still block most sun after the two hours. The FDA recommendations for reapplication every two hours are basically to provide maximum protection, because the level of protection does ...


7

If you are being attacked by a large predator a "small handgun" will accomplish nothing. If you hit something sensitive you will probably make it angrier - it won't make any difference to you if it dies from it's injuries the day after tomorrow, but at least it had a good final meal. Smith & Wesson used to make a short-barrel .50 revolver aimed at the ...


6

Polarization and UV protection on sunglasses are two different things. While UV refers to light of a wavelength of approximately 10nm to 400nm, light of any wavelength can be polarized. So polarized sunglasses do not generally protect against UV, they also need a dedicated UV filter. Light emitted by the sun oscillates in all directions perpendicular to the ...


3

I used to do a lot of backpacking with my wife in the backcountry in the Rocky Mountains. The places we hiked were remote - often hours would pass without seeing anybody else. I gave thought to getting a handgun, as protection from bad folks and/or wildlife. My father and I are fisherman, not hunters, so my knowledge of wild animals was minimal, and I had ...


3

Go to your nearest builder's supermarket, or even check a normal one, and look for worker's gloves. Or mechanic's gloves. Such as are used by people building houses or repairing cars. Those are very resistant and cheap. I've bought my ones for about 2-3$ (price in Poland, but I've found similar gloves in Germany too, only it was a small craftsman's shop). ...


2

You could look at sailing gloves such as these. There are loads of different varieties with open or closed finger versions depending on your preference. As mentioned by others many sailors also use rubber gardening or builders gloves. These are much cheaper but wear out a lot faster. I'm not sure how much of an issue this would be for kayaking.


1

I use these regularly for Kajaking, since i nearly ripped off my flesh while getting out of my yak at a stonewall. They're not waterproof, but they're very durable in my opinion and they dry very quick, and as an extra they are windproof. And also the seams don't rip at your fingernails while paddling as many others did which i tried. The palms are made out ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible