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13

Staying dry in a rain jacket requires you to sweat less moisture than the cloths you are wearing can breath out. The most effective way to let moisture out is ventilation, unfortunately, that means holes big enough to let water in -e.g. cotton. With a rain coat, apart from wearing it open, Pit zips (zips under the arms) are a very effective way to get a ...


9

I would imagine it's a breath-ability issue. "Breathable" waterproof fabrics, in my experience, are basically "pretty waterproof and allow some/most moisture out in most conditions." Especially in high humidity or in absolutely soaking weather, the math isn't right for the membrane to allow moisture out. But even in dry conditions if you put a GoreTex ...


6

Unfortunately there isn't much you can do if your rain jacket is not breathable. My recommendation is to replace your rain jacket with a poncho, which may be very cheap - while a highly breathable rain jacket cost hundreds of dollars. A poncho is much more ventilated than any jacket and will allow the moisture to leave your body by leaving it way drier; ...


6

A long time ago (when I was teenager) I had one of the early GoreTex jackets. I had this Jacket for years and years and used it constantly. Over time the fabric wore out and it started to leak. This actually got to the point where you could see though it in places (imagine a thin cotton t-shirt, that kind of thiness). So to answer your question: When ...


3

The answer will depend on the quality of the jacket and therefore somehow also the price. In the high-end range you often find jackets without zipper covers and still they are 100% waterproof (well to be honest this is a lie because at some point water will get through the zippers, still there are standardised tests so they can be called waterproof and not ...


2

After years of experience doing short and long treks in various climates this is the first time I hear of a trekking umbrella. And honestly, I'm not convinced. Yes, rain protection will be good, breathability is excellent and they are easy to set up and take down when the weather changes (even without taking of the backpack). The single big problem I see ...


2

So trekking umbrellas are apparently a thing. And no one can really argue the claim that they are the most "breathable" form of raingear. There are a couple varieties, some are designed ultra compact to be lightweight and packable, and others are designed to be rigged to your backpack for handsfree trekking. U.L. Trekking Umbrella Swing-Hands Free: The ...


2

Even breathable fabrics like Gore Tex will make you sweat when it's too warm - there needs to be a certain temperature difference for the fabric to work. So, you'll need to increase ventilation. The aforementioned pit zips are a good idea. A waterproof hat/cap instead of the jacket's hood also helps. Or just use an umbrella ...


1

Good zipper may keep out more water, but a rain flap will do the trick. A rain flap has a vulnerable direction. Driving rain from side with the open edge of the flap will seep further. Rain gear that will keep you dry bicycling is tough. You are either going to get wet or you are going to sweat, unless you have a flat route done at constant effort. I ...



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