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9

The creases that develop can theoretically compromise rain proofing treatment, especially if those creases cycle (bend and straighten repeatedly) however you can always retreat your gear to get more life out of them. Everything in camping is a compromise between what you can carry and what you need. If you need the stuff you've chosen, and in order to bring ...


7

Does it wear out more quickly if rain gear is stored in a stuff sack Pretty much everything wears out more quickly in a stuff sack. They put additional pressures onto the fibres, etc. So yes it will. How much quicker is open to debate and will vary considerably depending on how compressed, for how long and what fibres, treating you have on the item.


7

I've never had too much trouble with a double cuff - a velcro or (better) elastic inner cuff and a loose outer. In the worst conditions, an elasticated inner cuff under a goretex glove with long elasticated wrist seals was good for anything short of immersion. In the worst case a watersports dry cag would solve this. They have latex or neoprene wrist seals....


4

While working outside in the rain and when wearing a rain jacket, I have two simple solutions for keeping as dry as possible when the weather is miserable. I do not wear wrist bands because I like to have some ventilation. You cannot stop water from creeping inside, so I use latex gloves inside my regular gloves, this way my hands are reasonably dry. The ...


4

Stitch and seam seal. As Liam noted, softshells aren't really waterproof. There are plenty of products you could use to glue the patch and it would be more waterproof than the rest of your jacket. Unfortunately it would also be stiffer. When you apply a stiff material to a flexible one it will wear at the edges and make new holes. When you stitch, use a ...


4

After years of experience doing short and long treks in various climates this is the first time I hear of a trekking umbrella. And honestly, I'm not convinced. Yes, rain protection will be good, breathability is excellent and they are easy to set up and take down when the weather changes (even without taking of the backpack). The single big problem I see is:...


4

So trekking umbrellas are apparently a thing. And no one can really argue the claim that they are the most "breathable" form of raingear. There are a couple varieties, some are designed ultra compact to be lightweight and packable, and others are designed to be rigged to your backpack for handsfree trekking. U.L. Trekking Umbrella Swing-Hands Free: The ...


2

The simple answer to your question is 'no'. A more complicated answer would have to involve issues such as how many layers does the rain shell have, what are the fabrics involved, and is it being stored soaked for long periods of time. A number of current high end WP fabrics are on the fragile side, so putting the WP layer in between two other layers (be ...


2

When jackets get dirty and tired, they no longer 'bead' rainwater and will 'wet out' easier - This is when the outer layer becomes saturated with water. They should still be waterproof, because the inner membrane isn't affected by this. It's 100% waterproof, regardless. However, they won't feel waterproof, because the breathability relies on the water-...


2

You indicate your rain jacket is made with eVENT fabric. If that is the case there are NO nature-gatherable substance that could be applied to your shell that would NOT result in losing breathability and probably permanently destroying water resistance characteristics of the eVENT garment. eVENT membrane is highly sensitive to dirt, oils and other ...


1

In the situation you describe, mismatched gear is not going to provide what you want. If the rain is blowing sideways and/or hard enough to get past your tarp then it will most likely also blow in the gaps inevitably left by the mismatched gear. Unfortunately the answer is the news most people least want: You have the wrong tent for what you are looking ...


1

As a Scot I did a lot of wet climbing, so am pretty familiar with the issue you've asked about! I was careful to buy jackets with a good cuff, and I'd use absorbent sweat-bands on my wrists just inside the cuff to mop up any leakage. I'd also roll or ruck up the arms of my inner layers so they were above the sweat bands and stayed pretty dry. In ...


1

Primative waterproofing is accomplished by impregnating s material with an oil or wax or blend of each. Rubber also works well and since you are in Columbia, you can probably make your own from a rubber tree.



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