Hot answers tagged

24

You should run There's a good video from MinutePhysics that explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MqYE2UuN24 The short(er) version is that the amount of water you "run into" depends only on the distance, which is equal whether you run or walk. But the water falling on top of your head depends on how long you stay in the rain, and you can ...


20

You should walk. I have seen (and had) many 'accidents' from running in the rain - who hasn't? Although in theory running will keep you drier, there are more important things that staying dry. Running for the sake of staying drier is often done with little thought to the surroundings and potential consequences. You become goal focused - telling you ...


17

There are quite a few backpacks made of waterproof materials, especially among cottage manufacturers. ZPacks, Hyperlight Mountain Gear, Zimmerbuilt, Gossamer Gear, and many others manufacture packs out of Hybrid Cuben Fiber, Dimension Polyant X-Pac fabrics, or other waterproof materials. Even more mainstream manufacturers use a good deal of waterproof ...


16

Theoretically, run. Practically, slowly jog or briskly walk so that you don't slip and fall. The TV series MythBusters initially tested this with artificial rain and found that walking was better due to less surface area in the rain. However, after revisiting in actual rain, they found that running was better. Also, Lifehacker summed it up nicely: the ...


14

I was caught by a hailstorm the weekend before last. I was high above the tree line, the nearest trees were perhaps 20 km away, and several hours hiking from shelter. The hailstones were not huge, but large enough to hurt. Hail north of Rássevárri, above Guovdelisjávri, Narvik, Norway. There's only one place to hide: under my backpack. A backpack ...


11

Sleeping with the socks on your torso is the most effective method I have found, and it does not require anything you wouldn't already have. For this, you just: Take socks off Put them inside your shirt, under all layers of clothing. They must be touching your skin. Sleep Wake up in the morning with dry socks. This works with a lot of things: socks, ...


11

Disclaimer - I should mention that my answer only applies in the context of the original question. I'm discussing my experience rappeling in a rock climbing context, using a dynamic single or half rope, a "stich-plate" or tubular belay device, and an autoblock backup (not a prussik). I can't speak to rappeling in caving (where the gear would be different) ...


10

One very helpful thing is to brush him while you're towel drying. The brushing will help separate the hair to keep it from matting and will allow more air drying to occur. Also, if you use chamois leather to dry him off initially it will keep you from soaking a towel right away. The chamois will absorb a lot of water, but is easily wrung out to absorb ...


9

Roll top dry bags are fairly common. They are usually combined with either a pack cover or a pack liner. The pack liner is commonly an over-sized roll top dry bag placed inside your backpack. A cheaper option is to use a trash compactor bag as a pack liner. They are usually cheap and easy to find in the USA. Usually, the trash bag is put inside your bag ...


9

I don’t think that will work for heavy rain. The waterproofing coating will make the water slide away from the garment (this is the so-called lotus effect), but that’s just one part of keeping the water out. The harder part is not letting the water through under pressure, like when you press the garment against something, under your backpack straps, under ...


9

I would imagine it's a breath-ability issue. "Breathable" waterproof fabrics, in my experience, are basically "pretty waterproof and allow some/most moisture out in most conditions." Especially in high humidity or in absolutely soaking weather, the math isn't right for the membrane to allow moisture out. But even in dry conditions if you put a GoreTex ...


9

Other things to consider than just what to bring are what the rest of the weather will be beyond just raining. Will it be cold or still quite warm, what is the wind doing (especially if you're going up any big hills), etc. Depending on how severe the rain is flash flooding may be a risk, especially when it has been very dry before. Similarly if some paths ...


8

Pneumonia is not what you have to be worried about in this situation. It is a serious pathologic condition of the lungs commonly (but not exclusively) cause by viral or bacterial infection. Unless you were previously infected it is not likely to catch anything away from civilization. There is a widespread notion of a relation between being cold and catching ...


7

In simple terms. Yes. But it is easily avoided. When not in use dry off the bow and keep it in a waterproof case. Like anything, prolonged moisture is damaging. Using it in the rain is no problem, I'm talking about days or weeks without being dryed. Same goes with the string. They are usually coated in beeswax but moisture will eventually take effect. ...


7

I'm not familiar with your specific tent, but you typically don't block ventilation in a double walled tent. The outer rain fly will collect condensation from your own breathing and the tent needs to breath to reduce it. You also need to seal the seams on a tent if the factory doesn't do it for you, and sometimes even when they do. You can find lots of ...


7

A rain jacket is a good windbreaker as well. The main downside, as you pointed out, is that it will not breathe as well as other fabrics. This shouldn't be an issue as long as you aren't doing a lot of high-output activities (ex: climbing, hiking uphill with a heavy pack for hours). Regular hiking and the likes should be fine.


7

It also depends on your type of clothes. Wearing "non breathable" clothes will get you more sweaty than the rain will get you wet sometimes. Also if you wear a coat but no rainproof trousers, than running will probably get your trousers more wet, because of surface area increase. I think the best tactic can be seen by observing people in rain: Those ...


6

There is one thing about tents in general (well, at least I don't know any exception) - they are absolutely not waterproof!. The outer part simply soaks with water and leads it down to the ground. But if you touch it - you have a rain inside. It's just like touching the surface of the umbrella from the below. So there is one thing you must take very ...


6

I think the answer is as simple as: If you own a mid-layer wear it to the store when you purchase the shell. If you own a shell wear it to the store when you purchase your mid-layer. If you don't own either purchase them together to ensure best fit. There are several different layering systems find what works for you and try everything on in store. If ...


6

Disclaimer: I have never rappelled in the rain. Basic requirement As with any rappel problem a basic requirement is to have enough friction in the system, and preferably a way to go hands-free. As always this should be tested and not simply assumed. I don't think that anyone can tell you exactly what will produce the proper amount of friction without ...


6

A long time ago (when I was teenager) I had one of the early GoreTex jackets. I had this Jacket for years and years and used it constantly. Over time the fabric wore out and it started to leak. This actually got to the point where you could see though it in places (imagine a thin cotton t-shirt, that kind of thiness). So to answer your question: When ...


6

First of all you might need to look into getting a new impregnation for your second hand tent. This can be done either yourself using sprays or wash-in-products (and in your case a probably huge washing maschine) or by giving the tent for re-impregnation to professionals, i.e. your local outdoor/tent supplier (this can be expensive though). In any case it ...


6

It depends on the amount of rain and on the surface you are running/walking on. Now, there is unquestionably a threshold where the amount of rain makes the time exposure factor so significant that running wins without any doubt. However for lighter rain there might be another factor that turns the result. I remember reading a news paper article about ...


6

If you are backpacking or trying to travel light, bring a separate tent for the dog. There are lots of small tents built with this in mind. Even a small tarp will do the trick, if you aren't worried about bugs. A patch of grass under the tarp will make him perfectly happy. (You'll need to use a tie-out if you go with a tarp, of course.) For car camping, we ...


5

The complexity of backpacks, as well as the typical use case scenario has a lot to do with why the backpacks themselves aren't waterproofed. For example, the typical day in the life of a bicycle pannier involves relatively little exposure to water. You take it out in the rain for an hour or two, and then usually you take it inside with you wherever you go. ...


5

I am presuming this is not a hypothetical survival situation and it can be planned for. I used to regularly walked in wet boots for days, often in near (although rarely below) 0 degree temperatures, although pass hopping we could spend most of a day above the snow line with wet boots. A typical week to 10 day trip where I live you will cross a river ...


5

Having spent a lot of time running and walking in the rain I can say from experience that it's very much an individual specific choice. Personally I like to keep my body temperature up as I find it difficult to do so whilst walking; so I have to run. I'm reasonably fit so can run for an hour if need be, but others might not be, and for them it could be ...


4

It's hard to tell without all the details. As a rule of thumb I'd apply whatever was applied to the coat originally. If it didn't have a coating at all then the waterproof spray is likely the best option. The spray is likely going to produce the best result. Wax can discolour and make a jacket stiff. These day's wax is only used on "wax jacket" type coats. ...


3

Non-cheep correct-size raincoat. Mine is a decent quality (maybe 40 euro), but is too small for me and my trousers get soaked. Also, it should cover the backpack, as backpack-only rain-protection doesn't work in heavy rain - water finds it's way. Gaiters and boots, obviously. One more pair of socks than you think you will need. There are cheep wool socks ...


3

Generally a tarp is a bad idea as a long term solution as it shortens the life of the tent. As they are not shaped to fit around the tent (like a rain fly), they tend to sag in the middle and touch the outer. this quickly wears of the water repellent, and rubs the water into the fabric. Before long, the tent is leaking very badly without a tarp. Most people ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible