Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

I was caught by a hailstorm the weekend before last. I was high above the tree line, the nearest trees were perhaps 20 km away, and several hours hiking from shelter. The hailstones were not huge, but large enough to hurt. Hail north of Rássevárri, above Guovdelisjávri, Narvik, Norway. There's only one place to hide: under my backpack. A backpack ...


11

Disclaimer - I should mention that my answer only applies in the context of the original question. I'm discussing my experience rappeling in a rock climbing context, using a dynamic single or half rope, a "stich-plate" or tubular belay device, and an autoblock backup (not a prussik). I can't speak to rappeling in caving (where the gear would be different) ...


10

Sleeping with the socks on your torso is the most effective method I have found, and it does not require anything you wouldn't already have. For this, you just: Take socks off Put them inside your shirt, under all layers of clothing. They must be touching your skin. Sleep Wake up in the morning with dry socks. This works with a lot of things: socks, ...


9

I don’t think that will work for heavy rain. The waterproofing coating will make the water slide away from the garment (this is the so-called lotus effect), but that’s just one part of keeping the water out. The harder part is not letting the water through under pressure, like when you press the garment against something, under your backpack straps, under ...


9

Roll top dry bags are fairly common. They are usually combined with either a pack cover or a pack liner. The pack liner is commonly an over-sized roll top dry bag placed inside your backpack. A cheaper option is to use a trash compactor bag as a pack liner. They are usually cheap and easy to find in the USA. Usually, the trash bag is put inside your bag ...


7

Other things to consider than just what to bring are what the rest of the weather will be beyond just raining. Will it be cold or still quite warm, what is the wind doing (especially if you're going up any big hills), etc. Depending on how severe the rain is flash flooding may be a risk, especially when it has been very dry before. Similarly if some paths ...


6

I'm not familiar with your specific tent, but you typically don't block ventilation in a double walled tent. The outer rain fly will collect condensation from your own breathing and the tent needs to breath to reduce it. You also need to seal the seams on a tent if the factory doesn't do it for you, and sometimes even when they do. You can find lots of ...


5

I think the answer is as simple as: If you own a mid-layer wear it to the store when you purchase the shell. If you own a shell wear it to the store when you purchase your mid-layer. If you don't own either purchase them together to ensure best fit. There are several different layering systems find what works for you and try everything on in store. If ...


5

There is one thing about tents in general (well, at least I don't know any exception) - they are absolutely not waterproof!. The outer part simply soaks with water and leads it down to the ground. But if you touch it - you have a rain inside. It's just like touching the surface of the umbrella from the below. So there is one thing you must take very ...


5

Disclaimer: I have never rappelled in the rain. Basic requirement As with any rappel problem a basic requirement is to have enough friction in the system, and preferably a way to go hands-free. As always this should be tested and not simply assumed. I don't think that anyone can tell you exactly what will produce the proper amount of friction without ...


5

A rain jacket is a good windbreaker as well. The main downside, as you pointed out, is that it will not breathe as well as other fabrics. This shouldn't be an issue as long as you aren't doing a lot of high-output activities (ex: climbing, hiking uphill with a heavy pack for hours). Regular hiking and the likes should be fine.


3

The only one on your list that is no fun when wet is the Golden Gate visit. The following are all do-able on foot - I used the trolley cars as part of my exploration when I went to see the following: The trolley car to fisherman's wharf is a good idea. The Coit Tower is good for a walk around Haight-Ashbury can be fun for a half day or so Lombard Street ...


3

My one experience can be summarised as "ish". It definitely helped / worked in light rain, so if that's all you're trying to achieve then it should be fine. But for heavy rain or pressing the garment against a wet surface, it was all but useless. Afraid it was a while back and I can't remember the specific brand I used, but after talking to a couple of ...


3

I'm from the UK and have (therefore) rappelled in the rain lots ;-) The actual mechanics aren't that different. Being sprayed in the face with the wet grit that your device is squeegeeing out of your rope is one of the hazards - very unpleasant but not actually dangerous. Rather more serious might be that your wet rope - unlike your dry rope - is now a ...


3

Non-cheep correct-size raincoat. Mine is a decent quality (maybe 40 euro), but is too small for me and my trousers get soaked. Also, it should cover the backpack, as backpack-only rain-protection doesn't work in heavy rain - water finds it's way. Gaiters and boots, obviously. One more pair of socks than you think you will need. There are cheep wool socks ...


1

I would not advise putting wet socks anywhere near anything that's preventing you from getting cold if it would generate a risk of hypothermia through decreased insulation or increased heat conductivity. Using your body heat to dry socks is dangerous in cold conditions as you're taking heat from yourself. With this in mind, you should use an external heat ...


1

I always keep a folded parka or thick contractor garbage bag in the bottom of my pack - rain or shine. My pack is designed such that I can get into the bottom through a zipper quickly. Find any way to suspend it above you. Put two sticks in it on the sides and hold the sticks up. Or I prefer to tie/tuck one end on the top of my pack and hold it up the ...


1

Popup tents are also known as 'festival' tents, and are frequently regarded as single-use disposable items! Shroptshire Star: Volunteers clear up V Festival debris - in pictures Most Vango tents are at the cheaper end of the price scale - They aren't all bad (my first proper camping experiences in the UK were in a Vango tent), but the 'popup' end of ...


1

Sand will be an inherently trickier environment to camp in successfully I would imagine, since it retains moisture well and isn't as solid as earth. Personally I've never camped in sand, but I would imagine even a bit of sand piled on the tent walls could be the cause, that would be the first thing I'd try to eliminate. If the sand is moist (or becomes ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible