Hot answers tagged

24

You should run There's a good video from MinutePhysics that explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MqYE2UuN24 The short(er) version is that the amount of water you "run into" depends only on the distance, which is equal whether you run or walk. But the water falling on top of your head depends on how long you stay in the rain, and you can ...


20

You should walk. I have seen (and had) many 'accidents' from running in the rain - who hasn't? Although in theory running will keep you drier, there are more important things that staying dry. Running for the sake of staying drier is often done with little thought to the surroundings and potential consequences. You become goal focused - telling you ...


17

There are quite a few backpacks made of waterproof materials, especially among cottage manufacturers. ZPacks, Hyperlight Mountain Gear, Zimmerbuilt, Gossamer Gear, and many others manufacture packs out of Hybrid Cuben Fiber, Dimension Polyant X-Pac fabrics, or other waterproof materials. Even more mainstream manufacturers use a good deal of waterproof ...


16

Theoretically, run. Practically, slowly jog or briskly walk so that you don't slip and fall. The TV series MythBusters initially tested this with artificial rain and found that walking was better due to less surface area in the rain. However, after revisiting in actual rain, they found that running was better. Also, Lifehacker summed it up nicely: the ...


10

One very helpful thing is to brush him while you're towel drying. The brushing will help separate the hair to keep it from matting and will allow more air drying to occur. Also, if you use chamois leather to dry him off initially it will keep you from soaking a towel right away. The chamois will absorb a lot of water, but is easily wrung out to absorb ...


8

In simple terms. Yes. But it is easily avoided. When not in use dry off the bow and keep it in a waterproof case. Like anything, prolonged moisture is damaging. Using it in the rain is no problem, I'm talking about days or weeks without being dryed. Same goes with the string. They are usually coated in beeswax but moisture will eventually take effect. It'...


8

Pneumonia is not what you have to be worried about in this situation. It is a serious pathologic condition of the lungs commonly (but not exclusively) cause by viral or bacterial infection. Unless you were previously infected it is not likely to catch anything away from civilization. There is a widespread notion of a relation between being cold and catching ...


7

It also depends on your type of clothes. Wearing "non breathable" clothes will get you more sweaty than the rain will get you wet sometimes. Also if you wear a coat but no rainproof trousers, than running will probably get your trousers more wet, because of surface area increase. I think the best tactic can be seen by observing people in rain: Those ...


7

I've never had too much trouble with a double cuff - a velcro or (better) elastic inner cuff and a loose outer. In the worst conditions, an elasticated inner cuff under a goretex glove with long elasticated wrist seals was good for anything short of immersion. In the worst case a watersports dry cag would solve this. They have latex or neoprene wrist seals....


7

Hail is a result of the same type of instability that causes thunderstorms. Not all thunderstorms have hail, but most hail is part of a thunderstorm. Therefore, all the same warnings for thunderstorms apply. You generally assume these kinds of storms can cause hail, even if many don't. The usual warnings of thunderstorms are distant rumble, obvious ...


6

If you are backpacking or trying to travel light, bring a separate tent for the dog. There are lots of small tents built with this in mind. Even a small tarp will do the trick, if you aren't worried about bugs. A patch of grass under the tarp will make him perfectly happy. (You'll need to use a tie-out if you go with a tarp, of course.) For car camping, we ...


6

First of all you might need to look into getting a new impregnation for your second hand tent. This can be done either yourself using sprays or wash-in-products (and in your case a probably huge washing maschine) or by giving the tent for re-impregnation to professionals, i.e. your local outdoor/tent supplier (this can be expensive though). In any case it ...


6

It depends on the amount of rain and on the surface you are running/walking on. Now, there is unquestionably a threshold where the amount of rain makes the time exposure factor so significant that running wins without any doubt. However for lighter rain there might be another factor that turns the result. I remember reading a news paper article about ...


5

Having spent a lot of time running and walking in the rain I can say from experience that it's very much an individual specific choice. Personally I like to keep my body temperature up as I find it difficult to do so whilst walking; so I have to run. I'm reasonably fit so can run for an hour if need be, but others might not be, and for them it could be ...


5

The complexity of backpacks, as well as the typical use case scenario has a lot to do with why the backpacks themselves aren't waterproofed. For example, the typical day in the life of a bicycle pannier involves relatively little exposure to water. You take it out in the rain for an hour or two, and then usually you take it inside with you wherever you go. ...


5

I am presuming this is not a hypothetical survival situation and it can be planned for. I used to regularly walked in wet boots for days, often in near (although rarely below) 0 degree temperatures, although pass hopping we could spend most of a day above the snow line with wet boots. A typical week to 10 day trip where I live you will cross a river ...


4

Having rappelled in waterfalls while canyoneering I can honestly say it's not as scary as it sounds. The rope can get more slippery, but the key is keeping a firm grip. I canyoneer without sticky canyoneering shoes (because they're expensive and I'm cheap) and I slip and fall all the time while getting over the edge of a waterfall or while rappelling down a ...


4

While working outside in the rain and when wearing a rain jacket, I have two simple solutions for keeping as dry as possible when the weather is miserable. I do not wear wrist bands because I like to have some ventilation. You cannot stop water from creeping inside, so I use latex gloves inside my regular gloves, this way my hands are reasonably dry. The ...


4

In order to distinguish hail from a thunderstorm you should know how the temperature is decreasing with altitude. Generally if it decreases really fast you have formation of hail. (Edit: you mentioned dew point, this is where condensation of warm hair happens, freezing level is not the same thing and it will be located somewhere higher than the dew point. ...


4

It's hard to tell without all the details. As a rule of thumb I'd apply whatever was applied to the coat originally. If it didn't have a coating at all then the waterproof spray is likely the best option. The spray is likely going to produce the best result. Wax can discolour and make a jacket stiff. These day's wax is only used on "wax jacket" type coats. ...


3

If you assume that both methods are about as effective, Then another parameter comes into place: If it rains very little it might be worth running, before it starts to rain more. If it rains alot, then you might want to maximize the possibility of if clearing up, i.e. walk slowly. (Or just wait in cover)


3

Generally a tarp is a bad idea as a long term solution as it shortens the life of the tent. As they are not shaped to fit around the tent (like a rain fly), they tend to sag in the middle and touch the outer. this quickly wears of the water repellent, and rubs the water into the fabric. Before long, the tent is leaking very badly without a tarp. Most people ...


2

48 hours is very definitively too long for your feet to be wet, even regardless of temperature. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immersion_foot_syndromes From the CDC article "Injury occurs because wet feet lose heat 25-times faster than dry feet. Therefore, to prevent heat loss, the body constricts blood vessels to shut down circulation in the feet. Skin ...


1

As a Scot I did a lot of wet climbing, so am pretty familiar with the issue you've asked about! I was careful to buy jackets with a good cuff, and I'd use absorbent sweat-bands on my wrists just inside the cuff to mop up any leakage. I'd also roll or ruck up the arms of my inner layers so they were above the sweat bands and stayed pretty dry. In ...


1

If the board is new then the main thing to worry about is the bearings. Riding through puddles increases your chance of picking up grit and other abrasives that can ruin bearings, and although many modern bearings are rust resistant, not all are. Older boards, especially those with some damage can also allow water to soak in between the layers. This will ...


1

From the sales material you quote it sounds like the 'wood' in question has been vacuum stabilised. This involves completely saturating the wood with a polymer resin so it is in effect more like a plastic composite than natural wood but retains the grain and appearance of wood. As long as the process has bee carried out correctly this should make the ...


1

Like a lot of decision made by a manufacturer it's a case of profit! At some level they've made a commercial decision. Waterproof fabrics are expensive, so if you make a bag using them then you have pass this onto the customer or take a hit on your profits. I would imagine that they've researched this and decided the demand for this doesn't match the outlay ...



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