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7

I know I am answering a slightly different, more general question, but I think it is quite crucial to learn how to unjam a rappel device without relying on anybody else's help before embarking on any kind of outdoor-rappelling adventures. I have gotten my ATC stuck more times than I'd like to admit. ATCs don't just like to eat poorly assembled autoblock ...


5

Rappelling is dangerous enough and doing this from very high heights is something to be taken extremely serious (unlike the video link you’ve given). All of the stuff that Kai K. has recommended I would assume you already knows without being told. In my mind, the piece about commando rappelling (very serious climbers do not do this) seems dangerous. I have ...


5

Freedom of the Hills has a chapter on rappelling that includes a detailed discussion of this topic. Tie it "uphill" from the belay device or "downhill"? Downhill. If the Prusik is downhill from the ATC, then the Prusik only ever has to supply enough force to brake you on the brake strand. This is much, much less than your body weight, which is what ...


3

I think you understand this, but just for the record: The recommendation is to learn how to use an autoblock correctly, and to make sure that the loops of the autoblock won't get caught in the belay device. This is done by a) extending the belay device, possibly with an anchor chain, and b) getting a custom made autoblock loop that is only long enough to ...


3

I'm from the UK and have (therefore) rappelled in the rain lots ;-) The actual mechanics aren't that different. Being sprayed in the face with the wet grit that your device is squeegeeing out of your rope is one of the hazards - very unpleasant but not actually dangerous. Rather more serious might be that your wet rope - unlike your dry rope - is now a ...


3

Please make sure you know what you are doing before you attempt this feat. Just because you have successfully rappeled there before, does not automatically mean you were/are qualified to do so. Very overhanging cliffs can't be rappelled in the traditional sense. "Bouncing," like another answer here suggests, does not work on steep overhangs. You have to ...


1

you must have identified and installed proper belay points which can be reached when overhanging be sure that your rope is long enough to reach that points always make knots at the end of your ropes don't use "commando" style use a friction knot as backup take equipment with you to ascend the rope if you don't reach the belay points talk with someone who ...


1

This answer is purely complementary and does not attempt to answer the question directly. Another option for securing a rappel is the fireman's belay. This works on single pitch climbs when someone is at the base of the cliff, or on multi-pitch routs when someone is already at the next, lower anchor. The belayer takes a hold of both strands of the rope, ...



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