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12

Pulling down ropes after abseiling in caving is common here in the UK, where a cave has an upper and a lower entrance with one or more pitches in between. We use Static rope and caving descenders are usually designed to only use a single strand of rope. We double the rope and tie a knot with a small loop near the middle of the rope. Then feed one end of the ...


11

I've had to deal with this question a lot teaching anchor building. When people have asked in the past I normally suggest they use the anchor you are most comfortable setting up, as they will both definitely work. That said, if we want to dive deeper into the rabbit hole, it's important to identify some distinct differences between them. Equalette: ...


10

It isn't that unusual to use 8mm rope in caving on vertical (at least in Europe) especially in deeper caves with more rope to carry down and of course, back out again. In the US cavers tend to rig pitches from a single anchor and take care that there are no sharp bits of rock the rope could come in contact with and use rope which is more abrasion-resistant. ...


10

No It is not ok to use that type of descending ring for fixed anchors. SMC Descending Rings are a one-piece aluminum ring which are intended to be placed at the top of a pull down rappel in place of a carabiner in order to facilitate recovery of ropes. SMC issues the following for care, maintenance and retirement schedule needs of their descender rings: ...


9

Was it safe? Yes, you were not in any danger here (unless your tree was a Charlie Brown Christmas tree). Was it the best thing to do? No, for a couple of reasons, the most important being that it does not comply with leave not trace ethics, and can badly scar the tree. It's also no good for your rope, dragging your rope through dirt and sap can ...


8

To answer your first question, it doesn't matter very much whether you put the prussik on the same strand as your dcd or on the free strand. One reason it might be considered safer is that putting the prussik on the other strand would allow the other rope to prussik to catch you if the line you were repelling on somehow failed. As this event is extremely ...


8

Leaving a sling behind is not as wasteful as you might think - a sling that has been rappelled off (without a 'biner or ring) must be retired anyway. In the scheme of the cost of recreational activity a few slings and rings add up to a minimal cost. Within reason, waste is not a reason to avoid leaving gear behind. There's a couple of things you can do to ...


8

I believe the "commando rappel" was invented by the military (special forces) though I can find no history of this. My understanding of the idea is that it allows you to rappel fast, gives you a free hand (to hold a weapon, handgun, etc) and allows you to see where you're going. So it's basically designed for rappelling into military situations. Unless ...


7

Yes, it does get left behind. Descending ring are meant to be used to facilitate the recovery of ropes, they save your rope from getting horribly dirty, damaged, or stuck, and leave much less of an impact than rappelling off of a tree or branch. Pulling you rope off of a tree will saw into the trunk and leave permanent scars, it could even possibly lead ...


6

I'd probably use the same technique I'd use if I was tandem abseilling with anyone, i.e. extend the abseil and attach both parties to it: | | @<- belay plate / \\ / \\ <- rope to adult child--adult ^ | / | <- tail of rope / attach child to adult as well as rope for safety So you extend the belay away ...


4

I love these situations "It tried it once, and it worked, must be safe"...... I am so glad aviation and car industry don't work that way. The answer has to be No, its not safe with ropes of different dimensions. Its also not safe with ropes of the same dimension. Which is less safe - I don't know and I don't care and neither should you. There is one place ...


4

An Aussie rappel is useful for when you need to see and work going forward. It's particularly useful on steep slopes, not just down vertical or extreme slopes you are going to run down. You may need to clear brush down a steep slope, working in front of you as you go, something you obviously can't do if you aren't forward facing and able to stand safely. ...


4

Both cordelettes and equalettes are made from loops of durable material; either a very large sewn sling or a loop of accessory cord (6 meters of 7 mm accessory cord is a common length). The issue with cordelettes that led to the idea of the equalette is that a standard cordelette does not equalize loads all that well. Most of the load will be applied to ...


3

You do not say what size tree, but to me big means something like 1/2 meter or more diameter trunk. Presuming a living tree with no obvious movement of the roots the tree was infinitely stronger than your quick draw or chains or bolts holding them to the rocks. "Was it safe" is not the right question "was it safer than what I already accepted as safe enough" ...


3

Short answer: If the tree is a living and thick one, then it was OK. That being said, there are several reasons you should had done a proper anchor with multiple points (trees, in this case) and equalized, and then walked back again to the top. One simple drawback of your approach is, that the friction between the rope and the tree trunk, when you recall ...


3

SMC's site doesn't say anything very helpful but, keep in mind that 14kN is enough to lift a medium sized car. In a rappel only situation, it should last for years. That being said....using 'left gear' is a judgment you should make for yourself. Even if you can't see any defects in a piece of metal, you never know if it has an invisible crack from taking a ...


2

This applies to most sport situations, but there will by some exceptions. This assumes you have draws or other proper gear at the anchors that are not part of the fixed anchors. Just led the route: Lower Following but not last: Lower Following, cleaning all pro but anchors: Lower Last and cleaning anchors or all pro: Rappel The most common exception to ...


1

Regarding the hauling question, I suggest keeping the descender and prusik on the same strand. Here's my reasoning: It keeps the second strand free in case you need to rap down to the person to administer first aid or other assistance. It allows you to use the second strand for hauling, in case you don't have a second rope around for that purpose. It ...



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