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1

I have the truly terrible technique of rappelling down to the point of the overhang, stopping, turning sideways so the rope is only half my hips width away from the cliff, then continuing. It makes me look like a rank amateur.


2

This reminds me of basic training when I was in the military. We started with the basics and went backwards over a 30' rock wall then I think it was a 90-100' rock wall backwards. When you do it the first time, the most unnatural thing was going from standing on the edge and letting the rope through your hands until you were still standing at the edge but ...


19

I was thinking about this question while rappelling over an overhang this evening with my little girl and payed attention to exactly what I do: Plant your feet on the edge of the overhang, keep your legs straight, and let the rope through your descender until your body has cleared the roof. Think of the wall as flat ground, you want your body as ...


11

This is not a direct answer but more of an extended comment about safety when rappelling on overhanging terrain. When rappelling over an overhang or an overhanging wall, make sure that you are certain that you will be able to reach the ground. Ideally you know that both ends of your rope are touching the ground. If your rope doesn't reach the ground you ...


7

I'm not aware of any special technique, as it mostly does depend on the actual situation. If you already rappelled quite a length, then the force pulling you to the rock might not be to great anymore, and if you feel confident you can certainly just take a big leap to cross the overhang. Otherwise I'd go slow. When rappelling you usually lean back and push ...


6

First of all, don't coil your rope in the "usual" U-shape, like climbers do! (example picture) Or in ASCII art ___ ------- //// o \\\\ |||| |||| |||| |||| |||| |||| \\// \\// This form is good for carrying, but not for tossing. You mention "lap-coiled", so probably you already know that, but it's worth mentioning (for the likes of ...


8

Toss the middle first. Throwing your rope isn't always the best solution. High winds, trees, and rocky slopes can make it easy for you to get your rope hung up. Throwing your rope is only really advisable if you're on a steep vertical cliff and there's little or no risk of getting your rope hung up on anything. When you do throw your rope though, it's ...


4

Having rappelled in waterfalls while canyoneering I can honestly say it's not as scary as it sounds. The rope can get more slippery, but the key is keeping a firm grip. I canyoneer without sticky canyoneering shoes (because they're expensive and I'm cheap) and I slip and fall all the time while getting over the edge of a waterfall or while rappelling down a ...


3

I also agree that 8mm rope is pretty safe. I've done pretty close to straight vertical rappels up to 160ft on it while canyoneering (8mm rope is very common in canyoneering). I'm assuming you've gone on your trip by now, but for anyone else who might be curious, I'd like to address the idea of different descenders. The speed that you travel on the rope has ...



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