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12

When I decided to trash my tent, which was so old and was no longer of any use for active camping, I and my mentor in trekking, firstly used the same tent to teach kids of how to pitch a tent. I also used some part of the tent fabric to make a sort-of a sand bag for me, which I used to tie to my legs during my running sessions. I have also used a piece of ...


8

I have a few lengths of retired rope (I don't climb myself, but have them from others) - they come in useful! I've used them for pulling things along, tying odd bits and pieces up securely, and when I used to do event tech work we'd often use them for rigging some of the lighter, cheaper lights (at the end of the day, if the rope fails with a light lantern, ...


5

People who work with children are usually very happy to take any old ropes for non-climbing purposes (marking playing fields, tug of war, anything really). Even an old rope totally unfit for climbing is still very good for them.


5

Kisu! A common use for old tents or especially their fly-sheets is as a survival shelter(also called a kisu). They're great for trapping heat to keep people warm for when you have to stop for a while (be it because you've a problem or you just want to have lunch). If you haven't sat into one on a cold day you really have no idea how good well they work. If ...


4

I've never done it personally, but you can weave an old rope into a rug. There are several patterns on the Internet. Here's one if them: http://www.summitpost.org/so-you-want-to-make-a-rope-rug-eh/263578 With an old harness, I'd recommend either: if it's still structurally sound, and less than 5 years old, keep it as a loaner harness for any time you ...


4

The Rope is never a thing to throw away at any point of time. You can make slings out of it, and teach your kids about knots and other rope handling procedures. Or You can use the sling as an accessory cord for self anchoring (under static loads - not dynamic) as long as it is not damaged. I have so far used a not-at-all-good-for-climbing piece of rope for ...


4

I would try these options below in order, if you haven't already done so. Repair Contact the manufacturer or a retailer that sells that brand. There is a good chance they might fix them under warranty. I've had many good experiences with getting older equipment that you think might not be covered taken care of, but each brand varies on how far they'll go. ...


3

Actually they can probably be fixed. For the cap there are two options with JB Weld that I have used. The first is described here, but basically consists of coating the original cap with JB Weld kwikplastic. The second is more complicated, but a better fix in my experience. First you have to coat the bottle nipple with a polyethylene lube, so ...



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