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14

There are 3 ways I've found of finding a leak in an air mattress: Soapy Water - It may not be likely, but perhaps you have some camp soap or something similar that you can use to make a soapy mixture that will bubble near the leak. Submerged - I know you said not near a large body of water, but even if you have just a small stream you may be able to dam up ...


9

Take a bath. Fill the bath tub with water and the pad with air, and put the pad underwater (if it's too big to all go under at once, check section by section). You should see bubbles coming out of the leak.


8

Sometimes you don't have a place to submerge your pad to find leaks, or it's just too cumbersome to do so. Here is a method for leak-finding that can be done at home or in the field: (Note the location: in a crease that is repeatedly stressed, being by the valve. Also note the difference between bubbles from suds and the bubble from the leak.) Fill a ...


7

I believe that the best material is the same as you backpack is made of, though you may want something tougher if you are planning more scrambling over granite boulders. There is a plenty of Cordura varieties which will meet your requirements. Make sure to choose waterproof Cordura (with a waterproof glistening film on one side, which will be the inner side ...


6

Your likely out of luck. Aluminium is used in tent poles because it is stiff, strong and light. The trade off is that because it is less dense and more stiff it is less forgiving to being "manipulated". When steel fails it fails slowly, aluminium simply breaks. You could bend it back and see what happens, who knows it might hold. But bending it back is ...


6

My personal recommendation would be to use Super/Krazy Glue for any small "cracks" in the rubber. I have successfully used it on rubber and it is quite effective! for the slightly larger holes than cannot be filled using a liquid glue, I would recommend the following: Apply a Gore-Tex or similar patch along with some "Shoe-Goo" or similar product. **After ...


6

From looking at the Crazy Glue Website and from reading what it can be used for on the packages, I wouldn't try it on fabric, especially synthetic things like a rain jacket. There does appear to be a Crazy Glue for wood and leather. Check the website. http://www.krazyglue.com/products/product.aspx?pc=KG821 Read the directions. I have used some other ...


6

I've seen people use a soldering iron and a piece kf abs plastic to repair tears in the hull but the best answer is short and simple to use for small holes: epoxy putty. just follow instructions on the packaging, fill the hole with a small (few mm) overlap inside and out and if you want sand down when hard and paint.


5

SilNet Seam Sealer is designed to seal the seams on nylon flysheets and can also be used glue to repair the same. See http://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/all-tent-accessories/seam-sealer-glue/ for more information. Alternatively, you could get Vango to repair the flysheet for you: http://www.vango.co.uk/gb/content/28-aftersales


5

The go to shoe repair glue I've always used is Shoe Goo. I've used it mostly for when my soles started to separate from my uppers, and it's always done the job for me. As far as resoling your shoes, you're right in your suspicion that the "easy solution" doesn't last, Shoe Goo advertises that it can be used to rebuild worn soles, and it will for minor ...


5

Your best bet for sewing is to use a Speedy Stitcher. The thick gauged thread works really well in boot/shoe repairs and is easy to use. You will be punching holes through the leather which creates potential for water to invade, but the waxy thread helps eliminate this issue. I would finish up with a coat of Sno-Seal, which is a great way to help ...


4

The main issue with repairing plastic hulls is that is that most adhesives don't bond very well to the plastic. For temporary repairs duct tape is the way to go. Its quite adhesive and waterproof. If the hole is too big use the duct tape to secure something else waterproof (e.g plyboard or plastic) in place. If possible try and do both inside and out. If ...


3

Basically, if you can't patch them individually there are only 2 real options left. First, get a new tent. Every tent I have had has developed this over time unless used with a tarp underneath. Any roll on sealant that would work, would increase the weight about as much as a light weight tarp. Also, they tend to make the tent harder to roll up, and more ...


3

I think you are correct and what you see it is the polyurethane coating chemically breaking down. Warm or damp conditions will accelerate this. An example image is displayed on the Outdoor Gear Lab tent-buying page under the section discussing polyurethane coatings. Usually this means it's time to get a new tent, although there is one thing you can try. ...


3

A temporary fix I have tried while fishing is to use duct tape. just tape on both sides if the hole and it should hold until you can make some more permanent repairs. To repair damage in a more permanent fashion you can fill the smaller holes with wet-room silicone and then cover the fix with a rubber patch of some description.


3

It's quite common to melt in some plastic - but be sure to get the same as the boat is made of. Most are PE so try to get some of that -- avoid ABS. Kits are available (random web example). The general recommendation among people I know who've done this is to use a hot air gun rather than a naked flame. You can also overfill a touch and smooth down ...


3

You say that the tent is held up by a single straight pole. That pole looks pretty minimal for the job, so if you make a straight replacement you'll likely face the same issue again. If you walk with trekking poles, you may have the option of using one as a tent pole if you use a little ingenuity. Much stronger. I've been doing this for years. ...


2

Aluminum has a crystal structure and can be hardened using a process called "work hardening." Long story short, you've hardened your pole by causing dislocation movements in the crystal structure of the aluminum. If you compare your bent pole to your other poles, you'll notice that it doesn't flex as much as it used to, that is because it is now a harder ...


2

You can find some goretex patches that you can use to repair. I fixed a pair of gaiters where crampons opened a whole on the side using one of those patches. I didn't turn up very good but I think it was my job instead of the patch itself. :) Goretex website has some information. I haven't used goretex for a while so I don't know how things are. ...


2

For from upto small leak holes to upto coin-sized holes, You can possibly use a Duct tape on the both sides. One more thing to add between the Duct Tape's point of contact is a filler like Some local Epoxy Compound product, or worst case a Chewing Gum (Chewed one :D). For a crack, you might just get it fixed by a Duct Tape.


2

From the Krazy glue web site There are a few things Instant Krazy Glue® is not intended for use on such as paper, foam, rear view mirrors, polyethylene, Teflon® or other fluorocarbons. From that list I'd basically say any form of plastic isn't going to get along. Lots of outdoor gear are effectively made from various forms of plastic so I would not ...


1

I have a similar problem with two great pairs of waterproof leather boots, with seams un-stitching alongside the ball of the foot. GearAid Freesole is a tough flexible urethane repair highly recommended to re-bond the leather seams tightly instead of trying to sew them. A tube of this was 6.50 CAD at MEC.



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