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13

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


8

There's a product called "Tenacious Tape" which is used for fabric repair. You should be able to find it at your local outdoor store, or search for it online.


6

The go to shoe repair glue I've always used is Shoe Goo. I've used it mostly for when my soles started to separate from my uppers, and it's always done the job for me. As far as resoling your shoes, you're right in your suspicion that the "easy solution" doesn't last, Shoe Goo advertises that it can be used to rebuild worn soles, and it will for minor ...


6

Feed the strap through the remains of the buckle, or the fabric loop it was formerly attached to. Then tie the strap to itself using a rolling hitch. By sliding the rolling hitch up and down the strap, you will be able to alter its effective length.


5

It looks like the webbing for the sternum strap is similar size to the webbing for the shoulder strap. In this pack you could unthread the left side of the sternum strap buckle (keeping the snap buckle), then thread in webbing that was attached to the broken buckle. This is a quick, easy repair that won't require any extra parts. As a bonus you can use ...


5

Given the description of the problem, it seems you have to replace the zip entirely. You can bring it to a tailor, they should be able to do most of it. They may not have the waterproof zipper, though, but you can find it online. Measure it first. It is probably a #5 size, though you don't have to use the exact same model. Or you can do it yourself if you ...


5

SilNet Seam Sealer is designed to seal the seams on nylon flysheets and can also be used glue to repair the same. See http://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/all-tent-accessories/seam-sealer-glue/ for more information. Alternatively, you could get Vango to repair the flysheet for you: http://www.vango.co.uk/gb/content/28-aftersales


5

The only knot that's I'm aware of that's any good at securing straps like that is a water knot. though I'm not convinced it's going to work in your case. You don't have a lot of slack, it tends to slip and it's not very adjustable. A better solution to your problem I think might be to change how your backpack works. Remove the strap that works from the ...


3

According to this German blog post either duct tape, the Tenacious Tape mentioned by Greg Hewgill in his answer or – and I was a bit surprised about that – also bicycle tube patches should be OK for an on-trail repair. However, the post also argues that normally these do neither look very nice nor are they very durable. Instead, they suggest to get the hole ...


3

I would probably use sail repair tape, which you should be able to get from most chandlers. You can get a range of colours to try and match your sleeping bag. As well as rolls of tape you can also get patches which are slightly easier to use and are often slightly cheaper, but give you a lot less tape. If you are only repairing a single patch these may be ...


3

You say that the tent is held up by a single straight pole. That pole looks pretty minimal for the job, so if you make a straight replacement you'll likely face the same issue again. If you walk with trekking poles, you may have the option of using one as a tent pole if you use a little ingenuity. Much stronger. I've been doing this for years. ...


3

If you have a local outdoor shop, take it in to see what they recommend. If it needs repairing, they might be able to do it if they are licensed by TNF, or they might be able to send it in on your behalf. And don't assume it isn't under warranty. This could be a known problem, and TNF is, like most outdoor gear companies, good about standing behind its ...


3

Carry a spare Things break. If you're expecting to be far enough for long enough, it helps to be able to repair your gear. In addition to needle and thread, I have in my rucksack a half-meter of webbing with two different spare buckles on it, it takes very little space, weight and money but has saved me a lot of pain a few times already.


1

Tie it together with two (2) bits of 5mm accessory cord (right size for general camp use, bear bags, BDSM games at home, etc.) or light weight climbing nylon tubing.. Light weight tubular webbing (like you would use for climbing, esp. winter climbing, maybe 5/8") can also be sewn to anything/anyone with dental floss and the awl of a Swiss Army knife, and ...


1

I have a similar problem with two great pairs of waterproof leather boots, with seams un-stitching alongside the ball of the foot. GearAid Freesole is a tough flexible urethane repair highly recommended to re-bond the leather seams tightly instead of trying to sew them. A tube of this was 6.50 CAD at MEC.



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