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6

My personal recommendation would be to use Super/Krazy Glue for any small "cracks" in the rubber. I have successfully used it on rubber and it is quite effective! for the slightly larger holes than cannot be filled using a liquid glue, I would recommend the following: Apply a Gore-Tex or similar patch along with some "Shoe-Goo" or similar product. **After ...


6

From looking at the Crazy Glue Website and from reading what it can be used for on the packages, I wouldn't try it on fabric, especially synthetic things like a rain jacket. There does appear to be a Crazy Glue for wood and leather. Check the website. http://www.krazyglue.com/products/product.aspx?pc=KG821 Read the directions. I have used some other ...


5

Your best bet for sewing is to use a Speedy Stitcher. The thick gauged thread works really well in boot/shoe repairs and is easy to use. You will be punching holes through the leather which creates potential for water to invade, but the waxy thread helps eliminate this issue. I would finish up with a coat of Sno-Seal, which is a great way to help ...


5

I've seen people use a soldering iron and a piece kf abs plastic to repair tears in the hull but the best answer is short and simple to use for small holes: epoxy putty. just follow instructions on the packaging, fill the hole with a small (few mm) overlap inside and out and if you want sand down when hard and paint.


3

I think you are correct and what you see it is the polyurethane coating chemically breaking down. Warm or damp conditions will accelerate this. An example image is displayed on the Outdoor Gear Lab tent-buying page under the section discussing polyurethane coatings. Usually this means it's time to get a new tent, although there is one thing you can try. ...


3

A temporary fix I have tried while fishing is to use duct tape. just tape on both sides if the hole and it should hold until you can make some more permanent repairs. To repair damage in a more permanent fashion you can fill the smaller holes with wet-room silicone and then cover the fix with a rubber patch of some description.


2

You can find some goretex patches that you can use to repair. I fixed a pair of gaiters where crampons opened a whole on the side using one of those patches. I didn't turn up very good but I think it was my job instead of the patch itself. :) Goretex website has some information. I haven't used goretex for a while so I don't know how things are. ...


2

The main issue with repairing plastic hulls is that is that most adhesives don't bond very well to the plastic. For temporary repairs duct tape is the way to go. Its quite adhesive and waterproof. If the hole is too big use the duct tape to secure something else waterproof (e.g plyboard or plastic) in place. If possible try and do both inside and out. If ...


2

It's quite common to melt in some plastic - but be sure to get the same as the boat is made of. Most are PE so try to get some of that -- avoid ABS. Kits are available (random web example). The general recommendation among people I know who've done this is to use a hot air gun rather than a naked flame. You can also overfill a touch and smooth down ...


2

For from upto small leak holes to upto coin-sized holes, You can possibly use a Duct tape on the both sides. One more thing to add between the Duct Tape's point of contact is a filler like Some local Epoxy Compound product, or worst case a Chewing Gum (Chewed one :D). For a crack, you might just get it fixed by a Duct Tape.


2

From the Krazy glue web site There are a few things Instant Krazy Glue® is not intended for use on such as paper, foam, rear view mirrors, polyethylene, Teflon® or other fluorocarbons. From that list I'd basically say any form of plastic isn't going to get along. Lots of outdoor gear are effectively made from various forms of plastic so I would not ...



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